V M Spicher

University of Geneva, Genève, GE, Switzerland

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Publications (5)17.65 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To facilitate the study of the prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection and its determinants in children, we developed a noninvasive saliva test. A capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of IgG to HSV in saliva was developed, validated against a commercial serum ELISA in 110 children and 187 adults and used in a cross-sectional population-based study including 2,048 children ages 1 to 17 years, recruited in day-care centers and schools of Geneva, Switzerland. Demographic and socioeconomic determinants of HSV prevalence were studied. The sensitivity and specificity of the saliva assay were 94.1 and 95.5%, respectively, compared with the commercial serum ELISA. Participation in the cross-sectional study was 86.6%. The overall prevalence of anti-HSV IgG was 23.91%. It increased with age up to 7 years, reaching a plateau at 35% without evidence for day-care or school transmission. The main determinants of prevalence were region of national origin and parents' professional category. This new saliva-based assay proved its feasibility in the first population-based study of HSV prevalence in children that uses saliva, confirmed its validity by identifying determinants of prevalence consistent with previous reports and yielded new information, such as the lack of influence of day-care attendance, in the population studied.
    The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 04/2001; 20(3):265-72. · 3.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A polymerase chain reaction kit (AMPLICOR EV) for the detection of enteroviruses (EV-PCR) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was evaluated in clinical conditions in a prospective blinded-intention study. Forty-three children (mean age 2.7 years) hospitalized for suspected meningitis or fever of unclear etiology were enrolled. EV-PCR was performed on a daily basis. Results were available in less than 2 days in 72% of cases. EV-PCR was positive in nine (21%) children, including three infants without CSF pleocytosis. Knowing their EV-PCR result would have allowed a saving of 18 hospital days and 12 days of antibiotic therapy. The EV-PCR in the CSF can thus be practically useful for children hospitalized for meningitis or fever if available on-site on a daily basis.
    Clinical Pediatrics 05/2000; 39(4):203-8. · 1.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Therapies containing two reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI) with or without protease inhibitors are used with increasing frequency in pregnant HIV-infected women. To assess the safety of antiretroviral therapy in pregnant women and their newborns. All clinical events and laboratory abnormalities in pregnant women on RTI with or without protease inhibitors and in their newborns were collected through an observational study. A total of 37 HIV-infected pregnant women have given birth to 30 children (by 30 April 1998). All received RTI, which were combined with protease inhibitors in 16 cases. Twelve women became pregnant while on treatment. Drugs used were as follows: zidovudine (n = 33), lamivudine (n = 33), stavudine (n = 4), indinavir (n = 9), ritonavir (n = 4), nelfinavir (n = 2) and saquinavir (n = 2). Adverse events during pregnancy were anaemia (n = 15), elevation of transaminases (n = 4), nausea/vomiting (n = 4), glucose intolerance (n = 2), nephrolithiasis (n = 2), diarrhoea (n = 2), hypertension (n = 1), insulin-requiring diabetes (n = 1). Adverse events in neonates were prematurity (n = 10), anaemia (n = 8), cutaneous angioma (n = 2), cryptorchidism (n = 2), transient hepatitis (n = 1). Non-life-threatening intracerebral haemorrhage occurred in a premature baby (33 weeks gestation) exposed during fetal life to zidovudine-lamivudine-indinavir, and in a term baby exposed to stavudine-lamivudine-indinavir. Extrahepatic biliary atresia occurred in one newborn exposed to zidovudine-lamivudine-indinavir. Maternal viral load was below 400 copies/ml in 18 out of 30 patients who delivered. One case of mother-to-child HIV transmission was identified. In HIV-infected pregnant women treated with two RTI with or without protease inhibitors, one or more adverse events occurred in 29 out of 37 women and in 14 out of 30 babies. In newborns, frequent prematurity, one case of biliary malformation and one intracerebral haemorrhage in a term baby are of concern. These observations do not preclude combination therapies during pregnancy but emphasize the necessity to maintain updated registers on their safety.
    AIDS 01/1999; 12(18):F241-7. · 6.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Therapies containing two reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI) with or without protease inhibitors are used with increasing frequency in pregnant HIV-infected women. Objective: To assess the safety of antiretroviral therapy in pregnant women and their newborns. Methods: All clinical events and laboratory abnormalities in pregnant women on RTI with or without protease inhibitors and in their newborns were collected through an observational study. Results: A total of 37 HIV-infected pregnant women have given birth to 30 children (by 30 April 1998). All received RTI, which were combined with protease inhibitors in 16 cases. Twelve women became pregnant while on treatment. Drugs used were as follows: zidovudine (n = 33), lamivudine (n = 33), stavudine (n = 4), indinavir (n = 9), ritonavir (n = 4), nelfinavir (n = 2) and saquinavir (n = 2). Adverse events during pregnancy were anaemia (n = 15), elevation of transaminases (n = 4), nausea/vomiting (n = 4), glucose intolerance (n = 2), nephrolithiasis (n = 2), diarrhoea (n = 2), hypertension (n = 1), insulin-requiring diabetes (n = 1). Adverse events in neonates were prematurity (n = 10), anaemia (n = 8), cutaneous angioma (n = 2), cryptorchidism (n = 2), transient hepatitis (n = 1). Non-life-threatening intracerebral haemorrhage occurred in a premature baby (33 weeks gestation) exposed during fetal life to zidovudine-lamivudine-indinavir, and in a term baby exposed to stavudine-lamivudine-indinavir. Extrahepatic biliary atresia occurred in one newborn exposed to zidovudine-lamivudine-indinavir. Maternal viral load was below 400 copies/ml in 18 out of 30 patients who delivered. One case of mother-to-child HIV transmission was identified. Conclusions: In HIV-infected pregnant women treated with two RTI with or without protease inhibitors, one or more adverse events occurred in 29 out of 37 women and in 14 out of 30 babies. In newborns, frequent prematurity, one case of biliary malformation and one intracerebral haemorrhage in a term baby are of concern. These observations do not preclude combination therapies during pregnancy but emphasize the necessity to maintain updated registers on their safety.
    AIDS 12/1998; 12(18):F241-F247. · 6.41 Impact Factor
  • V M Spicher, C A Siegrist
    Revue medicale de la Suisse romande 11/1996; 116(10):785-92.