Shibani Pati

University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States

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Publications (51)198.58 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Mounting evidence highlighting the benefits of hemostatic resuscitation has led to a renewed interest in whole blood (WB) and reconstituted WB (RWB). However, few data exist to characterize the clotting profiles of these variants. This study characterizes banked WB variants and RWB in standard 1:1:1 and 2:1:1 transfusion ratios of packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma, and platelets (PLTs). We hypothesized that the global hemostatic profile of 1:1:1 RWB is superior to 2:1:1 RWB and that PLT-modified WB (MWB) is superior to 1:1:1 RWB.
    The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 07/2014; · 1.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Thawed fresh frozen plasma (TP) is a preferred plasma product for resuscitation but can only be used for up to 5 days after thawing. Never-frozen, liquid plasma (LQP) is approved for up to 26 days when stored at 1°C to 6°C. We have previously shown that TP repairs tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)-induced permeability in human endothelial cells (ECs). We hypothesized that stored LQP repairs permeability as effectively as TP.
    The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery 07/2014; 77(1):28-33. · 1.97 Impact Factor
  • Shock (Augusta, Ga.) 01/2014; · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (AMNCs) have shown therapeutic promise for central nervous system insults such as stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). We hypothesized that intravenous injection of AMNC provides neuroprotection, which leads to cognitive improvement after TBI. A controlled cortical impact (CCI) rodent TBI model was used to examine blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, neuronal and glial apoptosis, as well as cognitive behavior. Two groups of rats underwent CCI with (CCI-autologous) or without AMNC treatment (CCI-alone), consisting of 2 million AMNC per kilogram body weight harvested from the tibia and intravenously injected 72 hours after injury. CCI-alone animals underwent sham harvests and received vehicle injections. Ninety-six hours after injury, AMNC significantly reduced the BBB permeability in injured animals, and there was an increase in apoptosis of proinflammatory activated microglia in the ipsilateral hippocampus. At 4 weeks after injury, we examined changes in spatial memory after TBI owing to AMNC treatment. There was a significant improvement in probe testing of CCI-autologous group in comparison with CCI-alone in the Morris Water Maze paradigm. Our data demonstrate that the intravenous injection of AMNC after TBI leads to neuroprotection by preserving early BBB integrity and increasing activated microglial apoptosis. In addition, AMNC also improves cognitive function.
    The journal of trauma and acute care surgery. 08/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We have recently demonstrated that injured patients in hemorrhagic shock shed syndecan-1 and that the early use of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in these patients is correlated with improved clinical outcomes. As the lungs are frequently injured after trauma, we hypothesized that hemorrhagic shock-induced shedding of syndecan-1 exposes the underlying pulmonary vascular endothelium to injury resulting in inflammation and hyperpermeability, and that these effects would be mitigated by FFP. In vitro, pulmonary endothelial permeability, endothelial monolayer flux, transendothelial electrical resistance (TER), and leukocyte-endothelial binding were measured in pulmonary endothelial cells after incubation with equal volumes of FFP or lactated Ringers (LR). In vivo, using a coagulopathic mouse model of trauma and hemorrhagic shock, pulmonary hyperpermeability, neutrophil infiltration, and syndecan-1 expression and systemic shedding were assessed after three hours of resuscitation with either 1XFFP or 3XLR and compared to shock alone and shams. In vitro, endothelial permeability and flux were decreased, TER was increased, and leukocyte-endothelial binding was inhibited by FFP compared to LR treated endothelial cells. In vivo, hemorrhagic shock was associated with systemic shedding of syndecan-1 which correlated with decreased pulmonary sydnecan-1 and increased pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability and inflammation. FFP resuscitation, compared to LR resuscitation, abrogated these injurious effects. After hemorrhagic shock, FFP resuscitation inhibits endothelial cell hyperpermeability and inflammation and restores pulmonary syndecan-1 expression. Modulation of pulmonary syndecan-1 expression may mechanistically contribute to the beneficial effects FFP.
    Shock (Augusta, Ga.) 06/2013; · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sunitinib malate is a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of human malignancies. A substantial number of sunitinib-treated patients develop cardiac dysfunction, but the mechanism of sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity is poorly understood. We show that mice treated with sunitinib develop cardiac and coronary microvascular dysfunction and exhibit an impaired cardiac response to stress. The physiological changes caused by treatment with sunitinib are accompanied by a substantial depletion of coronary microvascular pericytes. Pericytes are a cell type that is dependent on intact platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling but whose role in the heart is poorly defined. Sunitinib-induced pericyte depletion and coronary microvascular dysfunction are recapitulated by CP-673451, a structurally distinct PDGFR inhibitor, confirming the role of PDGFR in pericyte survival. Thalidomide, an anticancer agent that is known to exert beneficial effects on pericyte survival and function, prevents sunitinib-induced pericyte cell death in vitro and prevents sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity in vivo in a mouse model. Our findings suggest that pericytes are the primary cellular target of sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity and reveal the pericyte as a cell type of concern in the regulation of coronary microvascular function. Furthermore, our data provide preliminary evidence that thalidomide may prevent cardiotoxicity in sunitinib-treated cancer patients.
    Science translational medicine 05/2013; 5(187):187ra69. · 14.41 Impact Factor
  • John B Holcomb, Shibani Pati
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    ABSTRACT: Over the past century, blood banking and transfusion practices have moved from whole blood therapy to components. In trauma patients, the shift to component therapy was achieved without clinically validating which patients needed which blood products. Over the past 4 decades, this lack of clinical validation has led to uncertainty on how to optimally use blood products and has likely resulted in both overuse and underuse in injured patients. However, recent data from both US military operations and civilian trauma centers have shown a survival advantage with a balanced transfusion ratio of RBCs, plasma, and platelets. This has been extended to include the prehospital arena, where thawed plasma, RBCs, and antifibrinolytics are becoming more widely used. The Texas Trauma Institute in Houston has followed this progression by putting RBCs and thawed plasma in the emergency department and liquid plasma and RBCs on helicopters, transfusing platelets earlier, and using thromboelastogram-guided approaches. These changes have not only resulted in improved outcomes, but have also decreased inflammatory complications, operations, and overall use of blood products. In addition, studies have shown that resuscitating with plasma (instead of crystalloid) repairs the "endotheliopathy of trauma," or the systemic endothelial injury and dysfunction that lead to coagulation disturbances and inflammation. Data from the Trauma Outcomes Group, the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion (PROMMTT) study, and the ongoing Pragmatic Randomized Optimal Platelet and Plasma Ratios (PROPPR) trial represent a decade-long effort to programmatically determine optimal resuscitation practices, balancing risk versus benefits. With injury as the leading cause of death in patients age 1 to 44 years and hemorrhage the leading cause of potentially preventable death in this group, high-quality data must be obtained to provide superior care to the civilian and combat injured.
    Hematology 01/2013; 2013:656-9. · 1.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: After major traumatic injury, patients often require multiple transfusions of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) to correct coagulopathy and to reduce bleeding. A spray-dried plasma (SDP) product has several logistical benefits over FFP use in trauma patients with coagulopathy. These benefits include ease of transport, stability at room temperature, and rapid reconstitution for infusion. Our past work suggests that FFP promotes endothelial stability by inhibiting endothe-lial permeability. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The main goal of this project is to determine if solvent-detergent-treated SDP is equivalent to FFP in inhibiting vascular endothe-lial cell (EC) permeability and inflammation in vitro. Furthermore, this study aimed to determine if solvent-detergent treatment and spray drying of plasma alters the protective effects of FFP on EC function. The five groups tested in our studies are the following: 1) fresh frozen-thawed plasma (FFP); 2) solvent-detergent-treated FFP; 3) solvent-detergent-treated SDP; 4) lac-tated Ringer's solution; and 5) Hextend. RESULTS: This study demonstrates that in vitro SDP and FFP equivalently inhibit vascular EC permeability, EC adherens junction breakdown, and endothelial white blood cell binding, an effect that is independent of changes in Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1, Intracel-lular Adhesion Molecule 1, or E-selectin expression on ECs. Solvent-detergent treatment of FFP does not alter the protective effects of FFP on endothelial cell function in vitro. CONCLUSION: These data suggest the equivalence of FFP and SDP on modulation of endothelial function and inflammation in vitro.
    Transfusion 01/2013; 53(S1):80s-90S. · 3.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may be useful for treating a variety of disease states associated with vascular instability including traumatic brain injury (TBI). A soluble factor, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3), produced by MSCs is shown to recapitulate the beneficial effects of MSCs on endothelial function and to ameliorate the effects of a compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB) due to TBI. Intravenous administration of recombinant TIMP3 inhibited BBB permeability caused by TBI, whereas attenuation of TIMP3 expression in intravenously administered MSCs blocked the beneficial effects of the MSCs on BBB permeability and stability. MSCs increased circulating concentrations of soluble TIMP3, which blocked vascular endothelial growth factor-A-induced breakdown of endothelial cell adherens junctions in vitro and in vivo. These findings elucidate a potential molecular mechanism for the beneficial effects of MSCs on the BBB after TBI and demonstrate a role for TIMP3 in the regulation of BBB integrity.
    Science translational medicine 11/2012; 4(161):161ra150. · 14.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: We have demonstrated previously that the intravenous delivery of multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPC) after traumatic brain injury affords neuroprotection via interaction with splenocytes, leading to an increase in systemic anti-inflammatory cytokines. We hypothesize that the observed modulation of the systemic inflammatory milieu is related to T regulatory cells and a subsequent increase in the locoregional neuroprotective M2 macrophage population. METHODS: C57B6 mice were injected with intravenous MAPC 2 and 24 hours after controlled cortical impact injury. Animals were euthanized 24, 48, 72, and 120 hours after injury. In vivo, the proportion of CD4+/CD25+/FOXP3+ T-regulatory cells were measured in the splenocyte population and plasma. In addition, the brain CD86+ M1 and CD206+ M2 macrophage populations were quantified. A series of in vitro co-cultures were completed to investigate the need for direct MAPC:splenocyte contact as well as the effect of MAPC therapy on M1 and M2 macrophage subtype apoptosis and proliferation. RESULTS: Significant increases in the splenocyte and plasma T regulatory cell populations were observed with MAPC therapy at 24 and 48 hours, respectively. In addition, MAPC therapy was associated with an increase in the brain M2/M1 macrophage ratio at 24, 48 and 120 hours after cortical injury. In vitro cultures of activated microglia with supernatant derived from MAPC:splenocyte co-cultures also demonstrated an increase in the M2/M1 ratio. The observed changes were secondary to an increase in M1 macrophage apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: The data show that the intravenous delivery of MAPC after cortical injury results in increases in T regulatory cells in splenocytes and plasma with a concordant increase in the locoregional M2/M1 macrophage ratio. Direct contact between the MAPC and splenocytes is required to modulate activated microglia, adding further evidence to the central role of the spleen in MAPC-mediated neuroprotection.
    Journal of Neuroinflammation 09/2012; 9(1):228. · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Over the past 10 years, a great deal has been learned about the fundamental biology and therapeutic application of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Intravenous administration of these cells is the preferred route for therapeutic delivery of MSCs. Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are the first cell type that MSCs encounter following IV administration. However, little is known about the biological consequences of interactions between MSCs and ECs, and if any therapeutic benefit results from this interaction. We show that MSCs exert potent stabilizing effects on ECs using an in vitro coculture system. Such effects include decreased EC proliferation and the reduction of EC vascular network formation in matrigel. Interestingly, these effects appear to require EC-MSC contact and result in enhanced colocalization of VE-Cadherin and β-catenin at the cell membrane. Disruption of the VE-Cadherin/β-catenin interaction abrogates the observed effects. As a functional in vivo correlate, we show that intravenously administered MSCs strongly inhibit angiogenesis in a matrigel plug assay. Taken together, these results identify a novel mechanism of action of MSCs that involves a contact-dependent EC interaction. These findings are relevant to intravenous use of MSCs and provide insight into further optimizing therapeutic strategies involving MSCs.
    Stem cells and development 06/2012; · 4.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A number of studies have established a deleterious role for inflammatory molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pathology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) has been shown to exert both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. The primary objective of the present study was to examine if CAPE could be used to reduce some of the pathological consequences of TBI using rodent models. Male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice were subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity was assessed by examining claudin-5 expression and the extravasation of Evans blue dye. The effect of post-injury CAPE administration on neurobehavioral function was assessed using vestibulomotor, motor, and two hippocampus-dependent learning and memory tasks. We report that post-TBI administration of CAPE reduces Evans blue extravasation both in rats and mice. This improvement was associated with preservation of the levels of the tight junction protein claudin-5. CAPE treatment did not improve performance in either vestibulomotor/motor function (tested using beam balance and foot-fault tests), or in learning and memory function (tested using the Morris water maze and associative fear memory tasks). However, animals treated with CAPE were found to have significantly less cortical tissue loss than vehicle-treated controls. These findings suggest that CAPE may provide benefit in the treatment of vascular compromise following central nervous system injury.
    Journal of neurotrauma 12/2011; 29(6):1209-18. · 4.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent data have associated improved survival after hemorrhagic shock with the early use of plasma-based resuscitation. Our laboratory has shown that FFP5 has decreased hemostatic potential compared with freshly thawed plasma (FFP0). We hypothesized that FFP5 would increase bleeding and mortality compared with FFP0 in a rodent bioassay model of uncontrolled liver hemorrhage. Hemostatic potential of plasma was assessed with the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram (CAT) assay. Rats underwent isovolemic hemodilution by 15% of blood volume with the two human plasma groups (FFP0 and FFP5) and two controls (sham and lactated Ringers). A liver injury was created by excising a portion of liver resulting in uncontrolled hemorrhage. Rats that lived for 30 minutes after liver injury were resuscitated to their baseline blood pressure and followed for 6 hours. Hemostasis was assessed by thromboelastography. Hemostatic potential of FFP5 decreased significantly in all areas measured in the CAT assay as compared with FFP0 (p < 0.01). In the FFP5 group, overall survival was 54%, compared with 100% in the FFP0 and sham group (p = 0.03). For animals that survived 30 minutes and were resuscitated, there was no difference in bleeding and/or coagulopathy between groups. Irrespective of treatment, animals that died after resuscitation demonstrated increased intraperitoneal fluid volume (14.85 mL ± 1.9 mL vs. 7.02 mL ± 0.3 mL, p < 0.001). In this model of mild preinjury hemodilution with plasma, rats that received FFP5 had decreased survival after uncontrolled hemorrhage from hepatic injury. There were no differences in coagulation function or intraperitoneal fluid volume between the two plasma groups.
    The Journal of trauma 11/2011; 71(5):1115-9. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) sets in motion cascades of biochemical changes that result in delayed cell death and altered neuronal architecture. Studies have demonstrated that inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) effectively reduces apoptosis following a number of stimuli. The Wnt family of proteins, and growth factors are two major factors that regulate GSK-3 activity. In the absence of stimuli, GSK-3 is constitutively active and is complexed with Axin, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), and casein kinase Iα (CK1α) and phosphorylates ß-Catenin leading to its degradation. Binding of Wnt to Frizzled receptors causes the translocation of GSK-3 to the plasma membrane, where it phosphorylates and inactivates the Frizzled co-receptor lipoprotein-related protein 6 (LRP6). Furthermore, the translocation of GSK-3 reduces ß-Catenin phosphorylation and degradation, leading to ß-Catenin accumulation and gene expression. Growth factors activate Akt, which in turn inhibits GSK-3 activity by direct phosphorylation, leading to a reduction in apoptosis. Using a rodent model, we found that TBI caused a rapid, but transient, increase in LRP6 phosphorylation that is followed by a modest decrease in ß-Catenin phosphorylation. Phospho-GSK-3β immunoreactivity was found to increase three days post injury, a time point at which increased Akt activity following TBI has been observed. Lithium influences several neurochemical cascades, including inhibiting GSK-3. When the efficacy of daily lithium was assessed, reduced hippocampal neuronal cell loss and learning and memory improvements were observed. These influences were partially mimicked by administration of the GSK-3-selective inhibitor SB-216763, as this drug resulted in improved motor function, but only a modest improvement in memory retention and no overt neuroprotection. Taken together, our findings suggest that selective inhibition of GSK-3 may offer partial cognitive improvement. As a broad spectrum inhibitor of GSK-3, lithium offers neuroprotection and robust cognitive improvement, supporting its clinical testing as a treatment for TBI.
    PLoS ONE 09/2011; 6(9):e24648. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several recent military and civilian trauma studies demonstrate that improved outcomes are associated with early and increased use of plasma-based resuscitation strategies. However, outcomes associated with platelet transfusions are poorly characterized. We hypothesized that increased platelet:red blood cells (RBC) ratios would decrease hemorrhagic death and improve survival after massive transfusion (MT). A transfusion database of patients transported from the scene to 22 Level I Trauma Centers over 12 months in 2005 to 2006 was reviewed. MT was defined as receiving ≥ 10 RBC units within 24 hours of admission. To mitigate survival bias, 25 patients who died within 60 minutes of arrival were excluded from analysis. Six random donor platelet units were considered equal to a single apheresis platelet unit. Admission and outcome data associated with the low (>1:20), medium (1:2), and high (1:1) platelet:RBC ratios were examined. These groups were based on the median value of the tertiles for the ratio of platelets:RBC units. Two thousand three hundred twelve patients received at least one unit of blood and 643 received an MT. Admission vital signs, INR, temperature, pH, Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score, and age were similar between platelet ratio groups. The average admission platelet counts were lower in the patients who received the high platelet:RBC ratio versus the low ratio (192 vs. 216, p = 0.03). Patients who received MT were severely injured, with a mean (± standard deviation) Injury Severity Score of 33 ± 16 and received 22 ± 15 RBCs and 11 ± 14 platelets within 24 hours of injury. Increased platelet ratios were associated with improved survival at 24 hours and 30 days (p < 0.001 for both). Truncal hemorrhage as a cause of death was decreased (low: 67%, medium: 60%, high: 47%, p = 0.04). Multiple organ failure mortality was increased (low: 7%, medium: 16%, high: 27%, p = 0.003), but overall 30-day survival was improved (low: 52%, medium: 57%, high: 70%) in the high ratio group (medium vs. high: p = 0.008; low vs. high: p = 0.007). Similar to recently published military data, transfusion of platelet:RBC ratios of 1:1 was associated with improved early and late survival, decreased hemorrhagic death and a concomitant increase in multiple organ failure-related mortality. Based on this large retrospective study, increased and early use of platelets may be justified, pending the results of prospective randomized transfusion data.
    The Journal of trauma 08/2011; 71(2 Suppl 3):S318-28. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Since massive irreversible loss of cardiac myocytes occurs following myocardial injury, injection of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) has emerged as a promising therapeutic intervention. Despite the growing enthusiasm for this approach, the understanding of how hMSCs evoke cardiac improvement is ever more controversial. The present study critically tests hypothesis that hMSCs provide specific benefit directly to damaged ventricular myocytes. Cultures of neonatal mouse ventricular cardiac myocytes (nMCM) were subjected to two distinct acute stress protocols; incubations with either endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or toxic cytokine, IL-1β. Myocyte injury was assessed in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling assays in fluo-3-loaded nMCMs that were imaged with high temporal resolution by fluorescent microscopy. Following LPS or IL-1β treatment there was profound myocyte injury, manifest by chaotic [Ca(2+)](i) handling, quantified as a 3- to 5-fold increase in spontaneous [Ca(2+)](i) transients. Antibody neutralization experiments reveal such damage is mediated in part by interleukin-18 and not by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Importantly, normal [Ca(2+)](i) signaling was preserved when cardiomyocytes were co-cultured with hMSCs. Since normal [Ca(2+)](i) handling was maintained in transwell cultures, where nMCMs and hMSCs were separated by a permeable membrane, a protective paracrine signaling cascade is operable. hMSCs provoke a genetic reprogramming of cardiomyocytes. LPS provokes release of TNFα from nMCMs which is blocked by hMSCs grown in co- or transwell cultures. Consistent with cytokine release, flow cytometry analyses reveal that hMSCs also block the LPS- and IL-1β-dependent activation of cardiac transcription factor, NF-κB. Importantly, hMSC-conditioned medium restores normal Ca(2+) signaling in LPS- and IL-1β-damaged nMCMs. These results reveal new evidence that hMSCs elicit protective and reparative effects on cardiac tissue through molecular reprogramming of the cardiac myocytes themselves. Thus these studies provide novel new insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the therapeutic benefit of hMSCs in the setting of heart failure. This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".
    Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology 02/2011; 50(2):346-56. · 5.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The use of plasma-based resuscitation for trauma patients in hemorrhagic shock has been associated with a decrease in mortality. Although some have proposed a beneficial effect through replacement of coagulation proteins, the putative mechanisms of protection afforded by plasma are unknown. We have previously shown in a cell culture model that plasma decreases endothelial cell permeability in comparison with crystalloid. The endothelial glycocalyx consists of proteoglycans and glycoproteins attached to a syndecan backbone, which together protect the underlying endothelium. We hypothesize that endothelial cell protection by plasma is due, in part, to its restoration of the endothelial glycocalyx and preservation of syndecan-1 after hemorrhagic shock. Rats were subjected to hemorrhagic shock to a mean arterial blood pressure of 30 mm Hg for 90 minutes followed by resuscitation with either lactated Ringer's (LR) solution or fresh plasma to a mean arterial blood pressure of 80 mm Hg and compared with shams or shock alone. After 2 hours, lungs were harvested for syndecan mRNA, immunostained with antisyndecan-1, or stained with hematoxylin and eosin. To specifically examine the effect of plasma on the endothelium, we infused small bowel mesentery with a lanthanum-based solution, identified venules, and visualized the glycocalyx by electron microscopy. All data are presented as mean ± SEM. Results were analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc tests. Electron microscopy revealed degradation of the glycocalyx after hemorrhagic shock, which was partially restored by plasma but not LR. Pulmonary syndecan-1 mRNA expression was higher in animals resuscitated with plasma (2.76 ± 0.03) in comparison with shock alone (1.39 ± 0.22) or LR (0.82 ± 0.03) and correlated with cell surface syndecan-1 immunostaining. Shock also resulted in significant lung injury by histopathology scoring (1.63 ± 0.26), which was mitigated by resuscitation with plasma (0.67 ± 0.17) but not LR (2.0 ± 0.25). The protective effects of plasma may be due in part to its ability to restore the endothelial glycocalyx and preserve syndecan-1 after hemorrhagic shock.
    Anesthesia and analgesia 02/2011; 112(6):1289-95. · 3.42 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Surgical Research 02/2011; 165(2):206-206. · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Resuscitation with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is associated with improved outcomes after hemorrhagic shock. Many trauma centers are using thawed plasma that has been stored for up to 5 days at 4°C (refrigeration), yet the effect of refrigeration on FFP is relatively unknown. Previously, our group showed that refrigeration of FFP changed its coagulation factors and diminished its beneficial effects on endothelial cell (EC) function and resuscitation in an animal model of hemorrhagic shock. We hypothesize that growth factor composition of FFP is altered during refrigeration, leading to a diminished beneficial effect on EC. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β) is a potent inhibitor of EC migration and is released during refrigeration of platelets. We found increased TGF-β1 protein levels and greater activation of downstream mediators Smad2/3 during refrigeration of FFP. Both day 0 FFP (used on the same day after being thawed) and day 5 FFP (used after being thawed and refrigerated for 5 days) stimulated EC migration in vitro; however, the EC migration in day 5 FFP was significantly reduced. Inhibition of TGF-β type I receptor blocked FFP-induced Smad3 signaling in EC cells and restored the effectiveness of day 5 FFP on EC migration to a comparable level seen in day 0 FFP. These data suggest that the increased TGF-β levels during FFP refrigeration contribute to the deterioration of refrigerated FFP's effects on EC migration. This study identifies a novel molecular mechanism contributing to the reduced efficacy of refrigerated FFP.
    Shock (Augusta, Ga.) 02/2011; 36(1):54-9. · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to demonstrate benefit in multiple disease models characterized by inflammation such as sepsis and acute lung injury. Mechanistically we hypothesized that MSCs exhibit these properties through inhibition of leukocyte activation and modulation of leukocyte-endothelial interactions; key interlinked processes involved in the deleterious effects of injury and inflammation. In this paper we found that MSCs co-cultured with a monocytoid line, U937, inhibit U937 binding to pulmonary endothelial cells (PECs) stimulated with the inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Furthermore, we show that these effects on functional adhesion are not due to changes in inflammatory adhesion molecule expression on U937s. No changes were found in CD62L, CD29, CD11b and CD18 expression on U937s co-cultured with MSCs. To determine if the effects of MSCs on leukocyte-endothelial interactions are due to the effects of MSCs on leukocyte activation, we investigated whether MSCs affect functional activation of the transcription factor NF-Kappa B. We found that MSCs significantly inhibit transcriptional activation of NF-kappa B in U937s. We also found that MSCs inhibit DNA binding of NF-kappa B subunits p50 and p65 to putative NF-kappa B DNA binding sites. Concomitant with a decrease in NF-kappa B activation was a significant increase in IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine known to inhibit activation of NF-kappa B. Taken together, these findings show that MSCs have potent effects on leukocyte-endothelial interactions which may be due to the direct effects of MSCs on IL-10 and NF-kB. These findings suggest a potential therapeutic role for MSCs in diseases characterized by inflammation such as acute lung injury or multi-organ failure induced by traumatic injury.
    Journal of tissue science & engineering. 01/2011; Suppl 3:001.

Publication Stats

1k Citations
198.58 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2013
    • University of Texas Medical School
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2006
    • Institute of Human Virology
      Maryland City, Maryland, United States
    • Columbia University
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2001–2005
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore
      • Institute of Human Virology
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2002
    • Loyola University Maryland
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2000
    • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
      Houston, Texas, United States