Are you Sung Bin Kim?

Claim your profile

Publications (5)5.06 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Our objective was to examine the association between the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) and mortality in Korean hemodialysis (HD) patients. We examined the GNRI of 120 maintenance HD patients and followed these patients for 120 months. Predictors for all-cause death were examined using life table analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model. Life table analysis revealed that subjects with a GNRI < 90 (n = 19) had a marginally lower survival rate than did those with a GNRI ≥ 90 (n = 101) (Wilcoxon test, P = 0.048). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analyses demonstrated that the GNRI was a significant predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 0.966, 95% confidence interval 0.945-0.995, P = 0.018), after adjusting for age, sex, presence of diabetes mellitus, and body weight. These results demonstrate that the GNRI may be a significant predictor of mortality in Korean HD patients.
    Therapeutic apheresis and dialysis: official peer-reviewed journal of the International Society for Apheresis, the Japanese Society for Apheresis, the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy 04/2012; 16(2):121-6. · 1.53 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The spontaneous and serial rupture of the bilateral Achilles tendons without history of significant trauma is an uncommon complication in long-term hemodialysis (HD) patients. The majority of these patients have additional predisposing factors, such as previous use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics or corticosteroids. In general, this condition is associated with a coexisting systemic disease, including chronic kidney disease (CKD), secondary hyperparathyroidism, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and diabetes mellitus (DM). Here, we report a 46-year-old man who had been undergoing regular HD for 11 years. He developed a spontaneous and consecutive rupture of both Achilles tendons. Based on previous reports of tendon ruptures in uremic patients and on the patient's lack of corticosteroid or fluoroquinolone use, we believe that secondary hyperparathyroidism was the predisposing factor in this patient. The mechanism seems to be related to a high parathyroid hormone (PTH) level, which results in osteolytic bone resorption at the tendon insertion site. Treatment and prevention of such tendon ruptures include early surgical repair and control of secondary hyperparathyroidism, by use of vitamin D analogs, and total parathyroidectomy, with or without autotransplantation of a parathyroid gland.
    International Urology and Nephrology 01/2012; · 1.33 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The herpesviridae family includes, among others, herpes simplex virus, varicella zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus. Herpesviridae viral infections (HVIs) can lead to serious complications in lymphoma patients undergoing chemotherapy. There is no consensus on the dose and duration of antiviral prophylaxis in these patients. We retrospectively analyzed the incidence and risk factors for HVI in lymphoma patients undergoing chemotherapy. We reviewed the records of 266 patients who were newly diagnosed with lymphoma and received chemotherapy without acyclovir prophylaxis between June 1996 and August 2009. The cumulative incidence rate of HVI was 20.16% for 5 years from the start of chemotherapy. Independent predictive factors for HVI in lymphoma patients were: female sex [hazard ratio (HR) 2.394; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.245-4.607; P=0.009], cumulative dose of steroids per body surface area of at least 2500 mg/m(2) (HR 7.717; 95% CI: 3.814-18.703; P<0.001), and history of neutropenic fever (HR 0.297; 95% CI: 0.150-0.588; P<0.001). Female sex, high dose of steroids per body surface area, and neutropenic fever were risk factors for HVI in patients with lymphoma undergoing chemotherapy without acyclovir prophylaxis.
    American journal of clinical oncology 02/2011; 35(2):146-50. · 2.21 Impact Factor
  • Source
    The Korean journal of hematology 01/2009; 44(4).
  • Source
    Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases 01/2009; 67(6).