Nicole E Albert

Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, Wynnewood, Oklahoma, United States

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Publications (5)5.74 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Ritonavir is a protease inhibitor (PI) frequently prescribed with highly active antiretroviral therapy. It functions to boost the effectiveness of other PIs as a result of blocking their breakdown by the cytochrome P450 (3A4) pathway. Through this same mechanism, ritonavir has been shown to cause iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome (ICS) in patients using inhaled fluticasone. In addition, a small number of recent cases suggest that ritonavir may also cause this disorder by prolonging the duration of injected corticosteroids, such as triamcinolone. This case report presents a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patient taking ritonavir with ICS and secondary adrenal insufficiency, presumably due to systemic absorption and decreased metabolism of an epidural triamcinolone injection. To the authors knowledge, there have only been 4 previously reported cases describing ritonavir-potentiating ICS after receiving a corticosteroid epidural. This provides further proof that caution should be taken with nonparenteral use of triamcinolone in HIV patients on PIs.
    The American Journal of the Medical Sciences 04/2012; 344(1):72-4. · 1.33 Impact Factor
  • European Journal Of Haematology 04/2012; 88(4):367-8. · 2.55 Impact Factor
  • Nicole E Albert, Andrew Y Hamarich, Ami Joshi
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    ABSTRACT: An elevated factor VIII level has been shown to be an independent risk factor for venous thrombosis. However, physicians screen for this factor far less frequently than they screen for other coagulopathies. The causes of increased factor VIII levels are likely a combination of genetic and acquired variables. The authors describe a case of a healthy 48-year-old woman found to have a cerebral venous thrombosis, with her only identifiable risk factor being an elevated factor VIII level.
    The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 03/2012; 112(3):140-1.
  • The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 01/2012; 112(1):29.
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    ABSTRACT: Small cell carcinoma (SCC) is most commonly found in the lung but is occasionally found in the gastrointestinal tract and other extrapulmonary sites. Incidences of SCC in the esophagus and stomach are rare and have been reported almost exclusively in older individuals. The following case presents the discovery of small cell carcinoma of the stomach and esophagus in a 35 year old woman, which is the youngest reported incidence of this to date. Additionally, her course reflects the importance of early diagnostic endoscopy with biopsy and adequate sampling with appropriate immunohistochemical staining when malignancy is in the differential diagnosis, regardless of age or risk factors.
    Journal of gastrointestinal and liver diseases: JGLD 12/2011; 20(4):427-30. · 1.86 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

8 Citations
5.74 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Lankenau Institute for Medical Research
      Wynnewood, Oklahoma, United States
    • Mainline Health Systems
      Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, United States