Tania Kümpfel

Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, München, Bavaria, Germany

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Publications (107)491.44 Total impact

  • J Havla, T Kümpfel, R Hohlfeld
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    ABSTRACT: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, presumably autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. Early stages of the disease are characterized by conspicuous inflammation of the white and grey matter. During later stages, presumably secondary neurodegeneration leads to physical disability progression. Over the last decade increasingly effective therapeutic options have been approved. Currently 11 immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapies targeting relapse rate, disease progression and paraclinical disease activity are available, mostly for relapsing forms of MS. However, the ideal of "precision medicine" is still in the distant future since biomarkers for individualized treatment are lacking. For implementation of risk-management plans to minimize the risk of severe side effects, interdisciplinary collaboration between neurologists and internists is essential. In this review article we summarize practical aspects of the implemented risk-management plans, and discuss possible side effects and special caveats of the three new immunotherapies teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab. This article is based on, among others, the recently updated guidelines of the German Society of Neurology. Particular attention is given to the risks of new therapies, monitoring, and on special aspects needing attention when changing treatments. Teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab expand treatment options for relapsing-remitting MS. Treatment selection should take into consideration the safety profile of the substance, previous and concomitant diseases, and other individual factors. This requires in-depth consultation and individual assessment of current disease activity, the potential efficacy of the therapy, and the possible risks and side effects.
    Der Internist 02/2015; DOI:10.1007/s00108-015-3668-1 · 0.27 Impact Factor
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    02/2015; 2(1):e55. DOI:10.1212/NXI.0000000000000055
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    ABSTRACT: Approximately 25 % of women with multiple sclerosis (MS) suffer clinically relevant relapses during pregnancy. Almost all disease-modifying drugs are contraindicated in pregnancy. High-dose glucocorticoids have some serious risks, especially within the first trimester. Tryptophan immunoadsorption (IA) provides a safe option to treat MS relapses during pregnancy. In this case series we describe for the first time the use of tryptophan IA for MS and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) relapses during pregnancy and breastfeeding. In this study a total of 9 patients were retrospectively analyzed of which 7 patients received IA treatment during pregnancy, 2 during breastfeeding and 4-6 tryptophan IA treatments were performed per patient with the single use tryptophan adsorber. Primary outcome was symptom improvement of the relapse. In this study four patients with MS and one with NMO relapse during pregnancy were treated with IA without preceding glucocorticoid pulse therapy. The MS patients showed improvement in the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) by at least one point, the NMO patient showed significant improvement in visual acuity and two pregnant patients with steroid-refractory relapses showed clinically relevant improvement after IA. Of the patients two suffered from steroid-refractory relapses during breastfeeding and relapse symptoms improved in both cases after treatment with IA. All treatments were well tolerated and no serious adverse events occurred. Tryptophan IA was found to be safe, well-tolerated and effective in the treatment of MS and NMO relapses during pregnancy and breastfeeding, sometimes without preceding glucocorticoid pulse therapy. A binding recommendation is limited without prospective clinical studies.
    Der Nervenarzt 01/2015; DOI:10.1007/s00115-014-4239-8 · 0.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present histological, MRI, and clinical features of an adult patient with relapsing encephalomyelitis and antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Furthermore, we report molecular details of the recognized epitope that is specific for human MOG. A brain biopsy revealed multiple sclerosis (MS)-type II pathology. Some features overlapped with both MS and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD), whereas others were distinct from both MS and NMOSD. Immunoadsorption and rituximab induced clinical stabilization. This case contributes a new, so far missing link in the emerging spectrum of MOG-antibody-associated encephalomyelitis.
    01/2015; DOI:10.1002/acn3.164
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    ABSTRACT: BAFF and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), which control B cell homeostasis, are therapeutic targets in autoimmune diseases. TACI-Fc (atacicept), a soluble fusion protein containing the extracellular domain of the BAFF-APRIL receptor TACI, was applied in clinical trials. However, disease activity in multiple sclerosis unexpectedly increased, whereas in systemic lupus erythematosus, atacicept was beneficial. In this study, we show that an endogenous soluble TACI (sTACI) exists in vivo. TACI proteolysis involved shedding by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 releasing sTACI from activated B cells. The membrane-bound stub was subsequently cleaved by γ-secretase reducing ligand-independent signaling of the remaining C-terminal fragment. The shed ectodomain assembled ligand independently in a homotypic way. It functioned as a decoy receptor inhibiting BAFF- and APRIL-mediated B cell survival and NF-κB activation. We determined sTACI levels in autoimmune diseases with established hyperactivation of the BAFF-APRIL system. sTACI levels were elevated both in the cerebrospinal fluid of the brain-restricted autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis correlating with intrathecal IgG production, as well as in the serum of the systemic autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus correlating with disease activity. Together, we show that TACI is sequentially processed by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 and γ-secretase. The released sTACI is an immunoregulator that shares decoy functions with atacicept. It reflects systemic and compartmentalized B cell accumulation and activation. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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    ABSTRACT: Natalizumab for multiple sclerosis (MS) increases the risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML).
    Multiple Sclerosis 11/2014; DOI:10.1177/1352458514556296 · 4.86 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Neuroimmunology 10/2014; 275(s 1–2):14. DOI:10.1016/j.jneuroim.2014.08.042 · 2.79 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Neuroimmunology 10/2014; 275(s 1–2):5–6. DOI:10.1016/j.jneuroim.2014.08.021 · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Heterogeneous hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system dysregulation has been shown in multiple sclerosis (MS), and cross-sectional studies suggested increasing hyperactivity with longer, progressing disease. Longitudinal studies to confirm this hypothesis and to study the impact of disease modifying treatment (DMT) have not been performed. Objective/Method In order to determine the longitudinal evolution of HPA system activity in patients with MS, we performed an open follow-up evaluation of sixty patients with definite MS. Patients were untreated at baseline; at follow-up, 40 received DMT. From the combined dexamethasone/CRH test, performed at baseline and follow-up, we derived neuroendocrine indicators (maximum, maximum rise, mean location and area under the curve) for cortisol, ACTH and ACTH/cortisol ratio. Results In 20 patients who remained untreated (test-retest interval 28.8+/-5.4 months), ACTH/cortisol ratios decreased significantly, driven by both mild increase in cortisol and reduction of ACTH secretion. In 40 patients with DMT (test-retest interval 15.5+/-2.5 months), secretion of cortisol, ACTH and ACTH/cortisol ratios did not change significantly. There was significant, moderate correlation between baseline and follow-up tests for cortisol, but not for ACTH indicators. In untreated, but not in treated patients, change in ACTH/cortisol ratios showed moderate inverse correlation to the time interval between tests (Pearson: beta–0.52 to -0.56, p < 0.05); the relation to progression of neurological disability was not significant. Conclusions HPA axis activation in untreated MS drifts from hypothalamo-pituitary to more adrenal activation, consistent with adrenal sensitization or hypertrophy due to chronic HPA axis activation. HPA system regulation remains more stable in MS patients on DMT.
    Psychoneuroendocrinology 07/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2014.03.012 · 5.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Risks of natalizumab (NAT) therapy have to be weighed against disease recurrence after stopping NAT. Objectives: The objective of this paper is to identify risk factors for recurrence of relapses after switching from NAT to fingolimod (FTY) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: Patients (n = 33) were treated with NAT for 1 year, and then switched to FTY within 24 weeks (mean follow-up on FTY 81.1 (SD 26.5) weeks). Annual relapse rates (ARR) and Expanded Disability Status Scale scores (EDSS) were assessed. Descriptive statistics, univariate logistic regression analysis, and receiver operating characteristic curves were conducted. Results: Overall, 20 patients (61%) had relapses after discontinuation of NAT and 16 (48%) during FTY therapy. The maximum incidence of relapses occurred between weeks 13-24 post-NAT. The last EDSS during the switching period predicted relapses during subsequent FTY therapy. EDSS >3 separated most powerfully between the groups (sensitivity 64%, specificity 88%) and significantly predicted relapses (relative risk 3.27, 95% CI: 1.5-7.3). Seventy-five percent of patients with EDSS 3 remained free of relapses, compared to 18% of patients with EDSS >3. Conclusions: There was an increase of the ARR in the first year after switching from NAT to FTY. Last EDSS during the switching period was a predictor of relapses during FTY.
    Multiple Sclerosis 05/2014; 20(13). DOI:10.1177/1352458514533398 · 4.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE Natalizumab reduces multiple sclerosis relapses very effectively; however, severe disease activity may return once natalizumab treatment is withdrawn, as recommended during pregnancy. Sometimes restarting natalizumab treatment may be the best option for the mother, but the consequences for the infant are unknown. Except for a few single case reports, to our knowledge, comprehensive data about third-trimester natalizumab exposure are scant. OBSERVATIONS In a case series of 12 women with 13 pregnancies and highly active multiple sclerosis who were treated with natalizumab during their third trimester of pregnancy, we assessed the clinical and laboratory effects on the newborns. We observed mild to moderate hematologic alterations in 10 of 13 infants including thrombocytopenia and anemia. In a subsample of 5 mother-child pairs, we analyzed natalizumab levels in the umbilical cord blood. Natalizumab was detectable in all 5 newborns. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Natalizumab can be a therapeutic option in patients with highly active multiple sclerosis during pregnancy. We recommend that a pediatrician be available at the time of delivery to evaluate for potential complications of anemia and thrombocytopenia in newborns exposed to natalizumab during the third trimester.
    05/2014; 71(7). DOI:10.1001/jamaneurol.2014.209
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    ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE Natalizumab reduces multiple sclerosis relapses very effectively; however, severe disease activity may return once natalizumab treatment is withdrawn, as recommended during pregnancy. Sometimes restarting natalizumab treatment may be the best option for the mother, but the consequences for the infant are unknown. Except for a few single case reports, to our knowledge, comprehensive data about third-trimester natalizumab exposure are scant. OBSERVATIONS In a case series of 12 women with 13 pregnancies and highly active multiple sclerosis who were treated with natalizumab during their third trimester of pregnancy, we assessed the clinical and laboratory effects on the newborns. We observed mild to moderate hematologic alterations in 10 of 13 infants including thrombocytopenia and anemia. In a subsample of 5 mother-child pairs, we analyzed natalizumab levels in the umbilical cord blood. Natalizumab was detectable in all 5 newborns. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Natalizumab can be a therapeutic option in patients with highly active multiple sclerosis during pregnancy. We recommend that a pediatrician be available at the time of delivery to evaluate for potential complications of anemia and thrombocytopenia in newborns exposed to natalizumab during the third trimester.
    JAMA Neurology 05/2014; · 7.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), caused by JC virus (JCV), can occur in patients receiving natalizumab for multiple sclerosis (MS). JCV detection by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or brain biopsy is required for probable or definite diagnosis of PML. However, in some patients only low levels of JCV-DNA (<100 copies/ml) are present in CSF, making the diagnosis challenging.Objective: To assess the complementary value of a CSF JCV antibody index (AIJCV) in the diagnosis of natalizumab-associated PML.Methods: In 37 cases of natalizumab-associated PML and 89 MS-patients treated with natalizumab without PML AIJCV was assessed. Sera and CSF were tested in a capture ELISA, using JCV-VP1 fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) as antigen. Albumin levels and total IgG concentration were determined by immunonephelometry, and the AIJCV was calculated as published.Results: Twenty-six of 37 (70%) patients with natalizumab-associated PML exhibited an AIJCV >1.5, while this was seen in none of the controls (p<0.0001). At time of the first positive qPCR for JCV-DNA, 11/20 (55%) of patients with natalizumab-associated PML had an AIJCV>1.5. JCV-DNA levels of <100 copies/ml were seen in 14/20 (70%) of these patients of which 8 (57%) demonstrated an AIJCV >1.5.Interpretation: Determination of the AIJCV could be an added tool in the diagnostic workup for PML and should be included in the case definition of natalizumab-associated PML. ANN NEUROL 2014. © 2014 American Neurological Association
    Annals of Neurology 04/2014; DOI:10.1002/ana.24153 · 11.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent large-scale association studies have identified over 100 MS risk loci. One of these MS risk variants is single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs17066096, located ~14 kb downstream of IL22RA2. IL22RA2 represents a compelling MS candidate gene due to the role of IL-22 in autoimmunity; however, rs17066096 does not map into any known functional element. We assessed whether rs17066096 or a nearby proxy SNP may exert pathogenic effects by affecting microRNA-to-mRNA binding and thus IL22RA2 expression using comprehensive in silico predictions, in vitro reporter assays, and genotyping experiments in 6,722 individuals. In silico screening identified two predicted microRNA binding sites in the 3'UTR of IL22RA2 (for hsa-miR-2278 and hsa-miR-411-5p) encompassing a SNP (rs28366) in moderate linkage disequilibrium with rs17066096 (r (2) = 0.4). The binding of both microRNAs to the IL22RA2 3'UTR was confirmed in vitro, but their binding affinities were not significantly affected by rs28366. Association analyses revealed significant association of rs17066096 and MS risk in our independent German dataset (odds ratio = 1.15, P = 3.48 × 10(-4)), but did not indicate rs28366 to be the cause of this signal. While our study provides independent validation of the association between rs17066096 and MS risk, this signal does not appear to be caused by sequence variants affecting microRNA function.
    Neurogenetics 03/2014; 15(2). DOI:10.1007/s10048-014-0396-y · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuromyelitis optica (NMO, Devic's syn-drome), long considered a clinical variant of multiple sclerosis, is now regarded as a distinct disease entity. Major progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of NMO since aquaporin-4 antibodies (AQP4-Ab; also termed NMO-IgG) were first described in 2004. In this review, the Neuromyelitis Optica Study Group (NEMOS) summarizes recently obtained knowledge on NMO and highlights new developments in its diagnosis and treatment, based on current guidelines, the published literature and expert dis-cussion at regular NEMOS meetings. Testing of AQP4-Ab is essential and is the most important test in the diagnostic work-up of suspected NMO, and helps to distinguish NMO from other autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, AQP4-Ab testing has expanded our knowledge of the clinical pre-sentation of NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD). In addition, imaging techniques, particularly magnetic reso-nance imaging of the brain and spinal cord, are obligatory in the diagnostic workup. It is important to note that brain lesions in NMO and NMOSD are not uncommon, do not rule out the diagnosis, and show characteristic patterns. Other imaging modalities such as optical coherence tomography are proposed as useful tools in the assessment of retinal damage. Therapy of NMO should be initiated early. Azathioprine and rituximab are suggested as first-line treatments, the latter being increasingly regarded as an established therapy with long-term efficacy and an acceptable safety profile in NMO patients. Other immu-nosuppressive drugs, such as methotrexate, mycophenolate Members of Neuromyelitis Optica Study Group (NEMOS) are listed in the appendix.
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    ABSTRACT: Neuromyelitis optica (NMO, Devic's syndrome), long considered a clinical variant of multiple sclerosis, is now regarded as a distinct disease entity. Major progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of NMO since aquaporin-4 antibodies (AQP4-Ab; also termed NMO-IgG) were first described in 2004. In this review, the Neuromyelitis Optica Study Group (NEMOS) summarizes recently obtained knowledge on NMO and highlights new developments in its diagnosis and treatment, based on current guidelines, the published literature and expert dis-cussion at regular NEMOS meetings. Testing of AQP4-Ab is essential and is the most important test in the diagnostic work-up of suspected NMO, and helps to distinguish NMO from other autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, AQP4-Ab testing has expanded our knowledge of the clinical pre-sentation of NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD). In addition, imaging techniques, particularly magnetic reso-nance imaging of the brain and spinal cord, are obligatory in the diagnostic workup. It is important to note that brain lesions in NMO and NMOSD are not uncommon, do not rule out the diagnosis, and show characteristic patterns. Other imaging modalities such as optical coherence tomography are proposed as useful tools in the assessment of retinal damage. Therapy of NMO should be initiated early. Azathioprine and rituximab are suggested as first-line treatments, the latter being increasingly regarded as an established therapy with long-term efficacy and an acceptable safety profile in NMO patients. Other immu-nosuppressive drugs, such as methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and mitoxantrone, are recommended as second-line treatments. Promising new therapies are emerging in the form of anti-IL6 receptor, anti-complement or anti-AQP4-Ab biologicals.
    Journal of Neurology 01/2014; 261(1):1-16. · 3.84 Impact Factor
  • Joachim Havla, Reinhard Hohlfeld, Tania Kümpfel
    Journal of Neurology 11/2013; 261(1). DOI:10.1007/s00415-013-7191-9 · 3.84 Impact Factor
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    Joachim Havla, Ingo Kleiter, Tania Kümpfel
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    ABSTRACT: Natalizumab (NAT) was the first monoclonal antibody to be approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). While pivotal and postmarketing studies have showed considerable and sustained efficacy of NAT in RRMS, the increasing incidence of therapy-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a brain infection caused by the John Cunningham virus (JCV), is a risk associated with long-term therapy. The risk for therapy-associated PML is highest in so-called "triple risk" patients. Therefore, long-term NAT-treated, immunosuppressive-pretreated, and JCV antibody-positive patients often discontinue NAT therapy. However, until now, it is not known which treatment strategy should be followed after NAT cessation. Since disease activity returns to pretreatment levels, or even above, within 4-7 months from the last infusion of NAT, patients who stop NAT are at considerable risk of relapse and worsening of multiple sclerosis (MS)-related disability. Several strategies have been applied to prevent the recurrence of disease activity after discontinuation of NAT. Of these, bridging with intravenous methylprednisolone, and switching to glatiramer acetate or interferon beta (IFN-beta) do not seem to be effective enough. More promising results have been obtained in retrospective studies and case series with fingolimod (FTY), an alternative escalation therapy for RRMS, although some patients have showed a severe disease rebound after starting FTY treatment. The time interval between the discontinuation of NAT and the start of FTY might affect the recurrence of disease activity. Long-term data about the efficacy and safety of FTY treatment after cessation of NAT are urgently needed and should be further investigated. Prospective studies are warranted, to optimize treatment strategies for RRMS patients who discontinue NAT, especially because new therapies will be available in the very near future.
    Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management 10/2013; 9:361-369. DOI:10.2147/TCRM.S41552 · 1.34 Impact Factor
  • Annika Plate, Joachim Havla, Tania Kümpfel
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    ABSTRACT: Late-onset neutropenia (LON) has been described as a side effect of rituximab (RX) therapy in patients with rheumatological and/or haematooncological diseases but not neuromyelitis optica (NMO). We describe a 71-year old female patient, who had NMO for 22 years, had been treated with RX monotherapy five times (cumulative dosage: 11g; duration of treatment: 3 years) before she developed severe neutropenia (IV) 3 months after the last RX infusion.1 After exclusion of other causes, the diagnosis of LON was made. No complications occurred and neutropenia resolved without therapy. RX therapy was continued with intensive monitoring without any further LON and/or complications. In conclusion LON is a possible side effect during RX therapy and may also occur in NMO patients.
    09/2013; in press. DOI:10.1016/j.msard.2013.08.001
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    ABSTRACT: Recurrent myelitis is one of the predominant characteristics in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO). While paresis, visual loss, sensory deficits, and bladder dysfunction are well known symptoms in NMO patients, pain has been recognized only recently as another key symptom of the disease. Although spinal cord inflammation is a defining aspect of neuromyelitis, there is an almost complete lack of data on altered somatosensory function, including pain. Therefore, eleven consecutive patients with NMO were investigated regarding the presence and clinical characteristics of pain. All patients were examined clinically as well as by Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) following the protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS). Additionally, plasma endocannabinoid levels and signs of chronic stress and depression were determined. Almost all patients (10/11) suffered from NMO-associated neuropathic pain for the last three months, and 8 out of 11 patients indicated relevant pain at the time of examination. Symptoms of neuropathic pain were reported in the vast majority of patients with NMO. Psychological testing revealed signs of marked depression. Compared to age and gender-matched healthy controls, QST revealed pronounced mechanical and thermal sensory loss, strongly correlated to ongoing pain suggesting the presence of deafferentation-induced neuropathic pain. Thermal hyperalgesia correlated to MRI-verified signs of spinal cord lesion. Heat hyperalgesia was highly correlated to the time since last relapse of NMO. Patients with NMO exhibited significant mechanical and thermal dysesthesia, namely dynamic mechanical allodynia and paradoxical heat sensation. Moreover, they presented frequently with either abnormal mechanical hypoalgesia or hyperalgesia, which depended significantly on plasma levels of the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerole (2-AG). These data emphasize the high prevalence of neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia in patients with NMO. The degree of mechanical hyperalgesia reflecting central sensitization of nociceptive pathways seems to be controlled by the major brain endocannabinoid 2-AG.
    PLoS ONE 08/2013; 8(8):e71500. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0071500. · 3.53 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
491.44 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007–2015
    • Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich
      • • Institute for Clinical Neuroimmunology
      • • Institute of Clinical Neuroimmunology
      München, Bavaria, Germany
    • Ruhr-Universität Bochum
      Bochum, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2008–2014
    • Technische Universität München
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2012
    • Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
      • Department of Neurobiology
      Mayence, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
  • 1999–2007
    • Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry
      München, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2002–2005
    • Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology
      München, Bavaria, Germany
    • University Hospital München
      München, Bavaria, Germany