Vladimír Sychrovský

Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Praha, Praha, Czech Republic

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Publications (40)169.52 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The activation of N-glycosidic bond cleavage operated by lysine 249 (Lys 249) residue of base-excision repair enzyme hOGG1 was calculated for 2′-deoxyguanosine (G), 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (OxoG) and N6-(2’-β-D-deoxyribofuranosyl)-2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG). The interaction sites of Lys 249 included C1’, N3, and N9 atoms of the nucleosides. The N9-pathway, specifically the attack of lone-pair electrons at glycosidic nitrogen N9 of a nucleoside to proton of Nε-ammonium of Lys 249, resulted in effective activation of C1’-N9 bond that was highly specific with respect to normal (G) and damaged (OxoG, FapyG) nucleosides. The specificity of N9-pathway was owing to electrophilic (G) or nucleophilic (OxoG, FapyG) character of the glycosidic nitrogen and owing to specific interactions of the residues within catalytic pocket with substrate (particularly the Gly 42 hOGG1 residue) that enforced displacement of G out of interaction range of Lys 249. The chemical modifications of G owing to damage affected specifically number of molecular properties including particularly electrophilicity/nucleophilicity of N9, C1’-N9 bond order and aromatic character of nucleobase. The N9-pathway could be involved as a check-point mechanism during base-excision operated by hOGG1.
    RSC Advances 08/2014; · 3.71 Impact Factor
  • Tetrahedron. 06/2014; 70(25):3871–3886.
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    ABSTRACT: We have determined the three-dimensional (3D) structure of DNA duplex that includes tandem Hg(II)-mediated T-T base pairs (thymine-Hg(II)-thymine, T-Hg(II)-T) with NMR spectroscopy in solution. This is the first 3D structure of metallo-DNA (covalently metallated DNA) composed exclusively of 'NATURAL' bases. The T-Hg(II)-T base pairs whose chemical structure was determined with the (15)N NMR spectroscopy were well accommodated in a B-form double helix, mimicking normal Watson-Crick base pairs. The Hg atoms aligned along DNA helical axis were shielded from the bulk water. The complete dehydration of Hg atoms inside DNA explained the positive reaction entropy (ΔS) for the T-Hg(II)-T base pair formation. The positive ΔS value arises owing to the Hg(II) dehydration, which was approved with the 3D structure. The 3D structure explained extraordinary affinity of thymine towards Hg(II) and revealed arrangement of T-Hg(II)-T base pairs in metallo-DNA.
    Nucleic Acids Research 12/2013; · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Oligonucleotides conduct electric charge via various mechanisms and their characterization and understanding is a very important and complicated task. In this work, experimental (temperature dependent steady state fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy) and theoretical (Density Functional Theory) approaches were combined to study charge transfer processes in short DNA/DNA and RNA/DNA duplexes with virtually equivalent sequences. The experimental results were consistent with the theoretical model - the delocalized nature of HOMO orbitals and holes, base stacking, electronic coupling and conformational flexibility formed the conditions for more effective short distance charge transfer processes in RNA/DNA hybrids. RNA/DNA and DNA/DNA charge transfer properties were strongly connected with temperature affected structural changes of molecular systems - charge transfer could be used as a probe of even tiny changes of molecular structures and settings.
    Biophysical chemistry 07/2013; 180-181C:127-134. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A reaction mechanism that describes the substitution of two imino protons in a thymine:thymine (T:T) mismatched DNA base pair with a Hg(II) ion, which results in the formation of a (T)N3-Hg(II) -N3(T) metal-mediated base pair was proposed and calculated. The mechanism assumes two key steps: The formation of the first Hg(II) N3(T) bond is triggered by deprotonation of the imino N3 atom in thymine with a hydroxo ligand on the Hg(II) ion. The formation of the second Hg(II) N3(T) bond proceeds through water-assisted tautomerization of the remaining, metal-nonbonded thymine base or through thymine deprotonation with a hydroxo ligand of the Hg(II) ion already coordinated to the thymine base. The thermodynamic parameters ΔGR =-9.5 kcal mol(-1) , ΔHR =-4.7 kcal mol(-1) , and ΔSR =16.0 cal mol(-1) K(-1) calculated with the ONIOM (B3LYP:BP86) method for the reaction agreed well with the isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) measurements by Torigoe et al. [H. Torigoe, A. Ono, T. Kozasa, Chem. Eur. J. 2010, 16, 13218-13225]. The peculiar positive reaction entropy measured previously was due to both dehydration of the metal and the change in chemical bonding. The mercury reactant in the theoretical model contained one hydroxo ligand in accord with the experimental pKa value of 3.6 known for an aqua ligand of a Hg(II) center. The chemical modification of T:T mismatched to the T-Hg(II) -T metal-mediated base pair was modeled for the middle base pair within a trinucleotide B-DNA duplex, which ensured complete dehydration of the Hg(II) ion during the reaction.
    Chemistry 06/2013; · 5.93 Impact Factor
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    Irena Kratochvilova, Vladimir Sychrovsky, Ondrej Pav, Martin Vala
    Biophysical Journal 01/2013; 104(2):424-. · 3.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Density functional theory was employed to study the influence of O-phosphorylation of serine, threonine, and tyrosine on the amidic (15)N chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA) tensor in the context of the complex chemical environments of protein structures. Our results indicate that the amidic (15)N CSA tensor has sensitive responses to the introduction of the phosphate group and the phosphorylation-promoted rearrangement of solvent molecules and hydrogen bonding networks in the vicinity of the phosphorylated site. Yet, the calculated (15)N CSA tensors in phosphorylated model peptides were in range of values experimentally observed for non-phosphorylated proteins. The extent of the phosphorylation induced changes suggests that the amidic (15)N CSA tensor in phosphorylated proteins could be reasonably well approximated with averaged CSA tensor values experimentally determined for non-phosphorylated amino acids in practical NMR applications, where chemical surrounding of the phosphorylated site is not known a priori in majority of cases. Our calculations provide estimates of relative errors to be associated with the averaged CSA tensor values in interpretations of NMR data from phosphorylated proteins.
    Journal of Biomolecular NMR 12/2012; · 2.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A mechanistic pathway for cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (oxoG) catalyzed with the human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 DNA repair protein (hOGG1) is proposed in this theoretical study. The reaction scheme suggests direct proton addition to the glycosidic nitrogen N9 of oxoG from the Nε-ammonium of Lys249 residue of hOGG1 that is enabled owing to the N9 pyramidal geometry. The N9-pyramidalization of oxoG is induced within hOGG1 active site. The coordination of N9 nitrogen to the Nε-ammonium of Lys249 unveiled by available crystal structures enables concerted, synchronous substitution of the N9-C1' bond by the N9-H bond. The reaction is compared with other pathways already proposed by means of calculated activation energies. The ΔG(#) energy for the newly proposed reaction mechanism calculated with the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method 17.0 kcal mol(-1) is significantly lower than ΔG(#) energies for other reactions employing attack of the Nε-amino group to the anomeric carbon C1' of oxoG and attack of the Nε-ammonium to the N3 nitrogen of oxoG base. Moreover, activation energy for the oxoG cleavage proceeding via N9-pyramidalization is lower than energy calculated for normal G because the electronic state of the five-membered aromatic ring of oxoG is better suited for the reaction. The modification of aromatic character introduced by oxidation to the nucleobase thus seems to be the factor that is checked by hOGG1 to achieve base-specific cleavage.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 09/2012; 116(41):12535-44. · 3.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: NMR chemical shifts are highly sensitive probes of local molecular conformation and environment and form an important source of structural information. In this study, the relationship between the NMR chemical shifts of nucleic acids and the glycosidic torsion angle, χ, has been investigated for the two commonly occurring sugar conformations. We have calculated by means of DFT the chemical shifts of all atoms in the eight DNA and RNA mono-nucleosides as a function of these two variables. From the DFT calculations, structures and potential energy surfaces were determined by using constrained geometry optimizations at the BP86/TZ2P level of theory. The NMR parameters were subsequently calculated by single-point calculations at the SAOP/TZ2P level of theory. Comparison of the (1) H and (13) C NMR shifts calculated for the mono-nucleosides with the shifts determined by NMR spectroscopy for nucleic acids demonstrates that the theoretical shifts are valuable for the characterization of nucleic acid conformation. For example, a clear distinction can be made between χ angles in the anti and syn domains. Furthermore, a quantitative determination of the χ angle in the syn domain is possible, in particular when (13) C and (1) H chemical shift data are combined. The approximate linear dependence of the C1' shift on the χ angle in the anti domain provides a good estimate of the angle in this region. It is also possible to derive the sugar conformation from the chemical shift information. The DFT calculations reported herein were performed on mono-nucleosides, but examples are also provided to estimate intramolecularly induced shifts as a result of hydrogen bonding, polarization effects, or ring-current effects.
    Chemistry 08/2012; 18(39):12372-87. · 5.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Hg(2+) ion stabilizes the thymine-thymine mismatched base pair and provides new ways of creating various DNA structures. Recently, such T-Hg-T binding was detected by the Raman spectroscopy. In this work, detailed differences in vibrational frequencies and Raman intensity patterns in the free TpT dinucleotide and its metal-mediated complex (TpT·Hg)(2) are interpreted on the basis of quantum chemical modeling. The computations verified specific marker Raman bands indicating the effect of mercury binding to DNA. Although the B3LYP functional well-describes the Raman frequencies, a dispersion correction had to be added for all atoms including mercury to obtain realistic geometry of the (TpT·Hg)(2) dimer. Only then, the DFT complex structure agreed with those obtained with the wave function-based MP2 method. The aqueous solvent modeled as a polarizable continuum had a minor effect on the dispersion interaction, but it stabilized conformations of the sugar and phosphate parts. A generalized definition of internal coordinate force field was introduced to monitor covalent bond mechanical strengthening and weakening upon the Hg(2+) binding. Induced vibrational frequency shifts were rationalized in terms of changes in electronic structure. The simulations thus also provided reliable insight into the complex structure and stability.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 07/2012; 116(32):8313-20. · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effect of base pairing and solvation on pyramidalization of the glycosidic nitrogen found in the residues of parallel G-quadruplex with NDB ID UDF062 is analyzed and explained with theoretical calculations. The extent of the pyramidalization depends on the local geometry of the 2'-deoxyguanosine residues, namely on their glycosidic torsion and sugar pucker, which are predetermined by the 3D-architecture of G-quadruplex. Pyramidal inversion of the glycosidic nitrogen found in 2'-deoxyguanosines of G-quadruplex is induced owing to site-specifically coordinated solvent. Different adiabatic structural constraints used for fixing the base-to-sugar orientation of 2'-deoxyguanosine in geometry optimizations result in different extents of pyramidalization and induce pyramidal inversion of the glycosidic nitrogen. These model geometry constraints helped us analyze the effect of real constraints represented by explicit molecular environment of selected residues of the G-quadruplex. The maximal extent of the glycosidic nitrogen pyramidalization found in the high-resolution crystal structure corresponds to the calculation to deformation energy of only 1 kcal mol(-1). The out-of-plane deformations of nucleobases thus provide a way for compensating the site-specific external environmental stress on the G-quadruplex.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 04/2012; 116(16):4144-51. · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Determination of nucleic acid (NA) structure with NMR spectroscopy is limited by the lack of restraints on conformation of NA phosphate. In this work, the (31)P chemical shielding tensor, the Γ(P,C5'H5'1) and Γ(P,C5'H5'2) cross-correlated relaxation rates, and the (2)J(P,C3'), (2)J(P,C5'), and (3)J(P,C4') coupling constants were calculated in dependence on NA backbone torsion angles ζ and α. While the orientation of the (31)P chemical shielding tensor was almost independent of the NA phosphate conformation, the principal tensor components varied by up to ~40 ppm. This variation and the dependence of the phosphate geometry on torsion angles ζ and α had only a minor influence on the calculated Γ(P,C5'H5'1) and Γ(P,C5'H5'2) cross-correlated relaxation rates, and therefore, the so-called rigid tensor approximation was here validated. For the first time, the (2)J(P,C) spin-spin coupling constants were correlated with the conformation of NA phosphate. Although each of the two J-couplings was significantly modulated by both torsions ζ and α, the (2)J(P,C3') coupling could be structurally assigned to torsion ζ and the (2)J(P,C5') coupling to torsion α. We propose qualitative rules for their structural interpretation as loose restraints on torsion angles ζ and α. The (3)J(P,C4') coupling assigned to torsion angle β was found dependent also on torsions ζ and α, implying that the uncertainty in determination of β with standard Karplus curves could be as large as ~25°. The calculations provided a unified picture of NMR parameters applicable for the determination of NA phosphate conformation.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 03/2012; 116(12):3823-33. · 3.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Developing applications for metal-mediated base pairs (metallo-base-pair) has recently become a high-priority area in nucleic acid research, and physicochemical analyses are important for designing and fine-tuning molecular devices using metallo-base-pairs. In this study, we characterized the Hg(II)-mediated T-T (T-Hg(II)-T) base pair by Raman spectroscopy, which revealed the unique physical and chemical properties of Hg(II). A characteristic Raman marker band at 1586 cm(-1) was observed and assigned to the C4=O4 stretching mode. We confirmed the assignment by the isotopic shift ((18)O-labeling at O4) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The unusually low wavenumber of the C4=O4 stretching suggested that the bond order of the C4=O4 bond reduced from its canonical value. This reduction of the bond order can be explained if the enolate-like structure (N3=C4-O4(-)) is involved as a resonance contributor in the thymine ring of the T-Hg(II)-T pair. This resonance includes the N-Hg(II)-bonded state (Hg(II)-N3-C4=O4) and the N-Hg(II)-dissociated state (Hg(II+) N3=C4-O4(-)), and the latter contributor reduced the bond order of N-Hg(II). Consequently, the Hg(II) nucleus in the T-Hg(II)-T pair exhibited a cationic character. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis supports the interpretations of the Raman experiments.
    Nucleic Acids Research 03/2012; 40(12):5766-74. · 8.81 Impact Factor
  • Ladislav Benda, Bohdan Schneider, Vladimír Sychrovský
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    ABSTRACT: Dependence of NMR (31)P shielding tensor and (2)J(P,C) coupling constants on solvation of nucleic acid phosphate by Mg(2+) and water was studied using methods of bioinformatic structural analyses of crystallographic data and DFT B3LYP calculations of NMR parameters. The effect of solvent dynamics on NMR parameters was calculated using molecular dynamic. The NMR calculations for representative solvation patterns determined in crystals of B-DNA and A-RNA molecules pointed out the crucial importance of local Mg(2+) coordination geometry, including hydration by explicit water molecules and necessity of dynamical averaging over the solvent reorientation. The dynamically averaged (31)P chemical shift decreased by 2-9.5 ppm upon Mg(2+) coordination, the chemical shielding anisotropy increased by 0-20 ppm, and the (2)J(P,C5') coupling magnitude decreased by 0.2-1.8 Hz upon Mg(2+) coordination. The calculated decrease of the (31)P chemical shift is in excellent agreement with the 1.5-10 ppm decrease of the phosphorothioate (31)P chemical shift upon Cd(2+) coordination probed experimentally in hammerhead ribozyme (Suzumura; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 8230-8236; Osborne; et al., Biochemistry 2009, 48, 10654-10664). None of the dynamically averaged NMR parameters unequivocally distinguishes the site-specific Mg(2+) coordination to one of the two nonesterified phosphate oxygen atoms of the phosphate determined by bioinformatic analyses. By comparing the limit cases of static and dynamically averaged solvation, we propose that mobility of the solvent has a dramatic impact on NMR parameters of nucleic acid phosphate and must be taken into account for their accurate modeling.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 03/2011; 115(11):2385-95. · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    Ladislav Benda, Michal Straka, Yoshiyuki Tanaka, Vladimír Sychrovský
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    ABSTRACT: Metal atoms with a closed-shell electronic structure and positive charge as for example the Au(I), Pt(II), Ag(I), Tl(I) or Hg(II) atoms do not in some compounds repel each other due to the so-called metallophilic attraction (P. Pyykkö, Chem. Rev., 1997, 97, 597-636). Here we highlight the role of the Hg(II)Hg(II) metallophilic attraction between the consecutive metal-mediated mismatched base pairs of nucleic acids. Usually, the base stacking dominates the non-covalent interactions between steps of native nucleic acids. In the presence of metal-mediated base pairs these non-covalent interactions are enriched by the metal-base interactions and the metallophilic attraction. The two interactions arising due to the metal linkage of the mismatches were found in this study to have a stabilizing effect on nucleic acid structure. The calculated data are consistent with recent experimental observations. The stabilization due to the metallophilic attraction seems to be a generally important concept for the nucleic acids containing heavy metals with short contacts.
    Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 11/2010; 13(1):100-3. · 4.20 Impact Factor
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    Zuzana Vokácová, Lukás Trantírek, Vladimír Sychrovský
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    ABSTRACT: The pyramidalizations of N9/1 glycosidic nitrogens in DNA and RNA nucleosides, recently discovered and analyzed in their ultrahigh-resolution X-ray crystal structures ( Sychrovský ; et al. Nucleic Acid Res. 2009 , 37 , 7321. ), were found to have significant effects on the structural interpretation of the (3)J(C4/2-H1') and (3)J(C8/6-H1') NMR scalar couplings in purine/pyrimidine nucleosides. The calculated effects on IR and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra were only minor. The calculated structural deformations in nucleosides, depending on sugar-to-base orientation, gave rise to corrections in the phase shift of the Karplus equations for the (3)J(C8/6-H1') and (3)J(C4/2-H1') couplings ranging from -26° to +25° and from -5.7° to +2.0°, respectively. The sign alternation of this correction in syn and anti nucleosides arises from the stereoinversion of the N9/1 glycosidic nitrogen occurring upon reorientation of the glycosidic torsion. The effect was calculated consistently in the dG, dA, dC, dT, rA, and rG nucleosides. Utilization of the calculated phase-shift corrections in the design of Karplus equations for the (3)J couplings was suggested, and the effects on structural interpretation of the experimental couplings were evaluated.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry A 09/2010; 114(37):10202-8. · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We combined various experimental (scanning tunneling microscopy and Raman spectroscopy) and theoretical (density functional theory and molecular dynamics) approaches to study the relationships between the base-pairing patterns and the charge transfer properties in DNA 32-mer duplexes that may be relevant for identification and repair of defects in base pairing of the genetic DNA and for DNA use in nanotechnologies. Studied were two fully Watson-Crick (W-C)-paired duplexes, one mismatched (containing three non-W-C pairs), and three with base pairs chemically removed. The results show that the charge transport varies strongly between these duplexes. The conductivity of the mismatched duplex is considerably lower than that of the W-C-paired one despite the fact that their structural integrities and thermal stabilities are comparable. Structurally and thermally much less stable abasic duplexes have still lower conductivity but not markedly different from the mismatched duplex. All duplexes are likely to conduct by the hole mechanism, and water orbitals increase the charge transport probability.
    The Journal of Physical Chemistry B 03/2010; 114(15):5196-205. · 3.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a novel, fundamental property of nucleobase structure, namely, pyramidilization at the N1/9 sites of purine and pyrimidine bases. Through a combined analyses of ultra-high-resolution X-ray structures of both oligonucleotides extracted from the Nucleic Acid Database and isolated nucleotides and nucleosides from the Cambridge Structural Database, together with a series of quantum chemical calculations, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and published solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data, we show that pyramidilization at the glycosidic nitrogen is an intrinsic property. This property is common to isolated nucleosides and nucleotides as well as oligonucleotides-it is also common to both RNA and DNA. Our analysis suggests that pyramidilization at N1/9 sites depends in a systematic way on the local structure of the nucleoside. Of note, the pyramidilization undergoes stereo-inversion upon reorientation of the glycosidic bond. The extent of the pyramidilization is further modulated by the conformation of the sugar ring. The observed pyramidilization is more pronounced for purine bases, while for pyrimidines it is negligible. We discuss how the assumption of nucleic acid base planarity can lead to systematic errors in determining the conformation of nucleotides from experimental data and from unconstrained MD simulations.
    Nucleic Acids Research 09/2009; 37(21):7321-31. · 8.81 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

141 Citations
169.52 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003–2014
    • Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic
      • • Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry
      • • Centrum pro biomolekuly a komplexní molekulární systémy
      Praha, Praha, Czech Republic
  • 2012
    • Tohoku University
      • Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, Japan
  • 2005–2012
    • Ústav Organické Chemie a Biochemie AV ČR, v.v.i.
      Praha, Praha, Czech Republic
  • 2010
    • Institute of Physics ASCR
      Praha, Praha, Czech Republic