Kazuyoshi Takeda

Juntendo University, Edo, Tōkyō, Japan

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Publications (17)90.06 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Natural killer (NK) T cells are well known to play important roles in both tumor rejection and the defense against infectious. Therefore, the antitumor potential of NKT cell-activating antigens have been the focus for the development of NKT cell-based immunotherapies. Up to now, several studies have revealed that the administrations of glycolipids (e.g. α-galactosylceramide) can successfully treat certain metastatic tumors. However, liver injuries appeared upon the application of these antigens. We previously examined the potential of using β-glucosylceramide (β-GlcCer) to inhibit tumor metastasis to the liver. The aim of this study was to determine the antimetastatic effects of β-GlcCer and its impact on the activation of NKT cells. Intraperitoneal administration of β-GlcCer enhanced the production of interferon-γ from hepatic lymphocytes containing NKT cells, and increased the cytotoxicity of hepatic lymphocytes against tumor cells. Moreover, β-GlcCer administration suppressed the hepatic metastasis of tumors in wild type (WT) mice, but not in CD1d (-/-) or Jα18 (-/-) mice. The drawback associated with the other glycolipids in liver injury was not noted in WT mice treated with the continuous daily administration of β-GlcCer for 2 weeks. The present study demonstrated that β-GlcCer treatment activates invariant NKT cells, thus resulting in the inhibition of tumor metastasis.
    Lipids 03/2012; 47(6):581-91. DOI:10.1007/s11745-012-3666-1 · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Runx family proteins play indispensable roles in the development of various hematopoietic lineage cells. However, their function in NK cells is still uncertain. We found that NK cells and CD8 T cells dominantly express Runx3 protein, whereas NKT cells and CD4 T cells express Runx1. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that Runx3 expression is initiated at the NK precursor stage and is maintained along the course of NK cell differentiation. In order to examine their role in the earlier stage of NK cell development, we introduced Runx dominant-negative (Runx dn) form into Lin(-)c-kit(+)Sca-1(+) hematopoietic stem cells, which were applied to NK cell-inducing culture. Post-cultured cells showed a decreased expression of IL-2/IL-15 common receptor beta subunit (CD122), consistent with another finding that Runx binds to promoter region of CD122 gene. To examine the Runx function in the later developmental stage, we used transgenic mouse, in which Runx dn form is expressed in immature and mature NK cells. This mouse showed decreased expressions of NK maturation markers, such as Ly49 family, Mac-1 and CD43, whereas IFN-gamma production was greatly enhanced. These findings suggest that Runx proteins, especially Runx3, play multiple roles in NK cell differentiation.
    International Immunology 02/2008; 20(1):71-9. DOI:10.1093/intimm/dxm120 · 3.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inoculation with erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium berghei, a protozoan causing mouse lethal malaria, induces liver injury in mice, although the parasite cannot invade host hepatocytes at this infectious stage. As previously reported, hepatic infiltrates participate in this liver injury by exerting their perforin-dependent killing action. Here, we have investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying P. berghei-induced incidental liver injury. Hepatic lymphocytes from P. berghei-infected mice killed normal hepatocytes, but not ConA-induced lymphoblasts. Furthermore, the hepatic lymphocytes from infected C57BL/6 mice displayed cytotoxicity against hepatocytes from C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, indicating MHC-unrestricted hepatocytotoxicity by these hepatic lymphocytes. NK cells were not involved in this hepatocytotoxicity. However, DX5+ cells sorted from the liver of infected CD1d-deficient mice killed normal hepatocytes, indicating that CD1d-independent DX5+ T cells are the effector cells. The hepatocytotoxicity of these hepatic DX5+ T cells did not require TCR engagement. These findings indicate that hepatic CD1d-independent DX5+ T cells play a critical role in P. berghei-induced liver injury. Our studies may have general implications for tissue injuries that are caused by 'bystander killing' or other poorly defined cell-mediated killing mechanisms.
    International Immunology 07/2004; 16(6):787-98. DOI:10.1093/intimm/dxh080 · 3.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin (IL)-18 synergizes with IL-12 to promote T helper cell (Th)1 responses. Somewhat paradoxically, IL-18 administration alone strongly induces immunoglobulin (Ig)E production and allergic inflammation, indicating a role for IL-18 in the generation of Th2 responses. The ability of IL-18 to induce IgE is dependent on CD4+ T cells, IL-4, and signal transducer and activator of transcription (stat)6. Here, we show that IL-18 fails to induce IgE both in CD1d-/- mice that lack natural killer T (NKT) cells and in class II-/- mice that lack conventional CD4+ T cells. However, class II-/- mice reconstituted with conventional CD4+ T cells show the capacity to produce IgE in response to IL-18. NKT cells express high levels of IL-18 receptor (R)alpha chain and produce significant amounts of IL-4, IL-9, and IL-13, and induce CD40 ligand expression in response to IL-2 and IL-18 stimulation in vitro. In contrast, conventional CD4+ T cells express low levels of IL-18Ralpha and poorly respond to IL-2 and IL-18. Nevertheless, conventional CD4+ T cells are essential for B cell IgE responses after the administration of IL-18. These findings indicate that NKT cells might be the major source of IL-4 in response to IL-18 administration and that conventional CD4+ T cells demonstrate their helper function in the presence of NKT cells.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 05/2003; 197(8):997-1005. DOI:10.1084/jem.20021701 · 13.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Natural killer T (NKT) cells are mainly present in the liver and thymus, and the majority of these T cells express either a CD4(+) or a double-negative (DN) CD4(-)8(-) phenotype. In the present study, we examined whether such NKT cells were present in the intestine. NKT cells were rare in all sites of the small intestine, including an intraepithelial site. However, a considerable number of NKT cells were found at an intraepithelial site in the large intestine. This result was confirmed by both immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. In contrast to conventional NKT cells, NKT cells in the large intestine were CD8(+) or DN CD4(-)8(-). In the case of conventional NKT cells, their existence is known to depend on non-classical MHC class I-like antigens (i. e. CD1d) but not on classical MHC class I antigens. However, the NKT cells in the large intestine were independent of the presence of both CD1d and classical MHC class I antigens. These results were obtained using knockout mice lacking the corresponding genes and molecules. NKT cells in the large intestine were mainly alpha betaTCR(+) (> 75 %) but did not use an invariant chain of Valpha14Jalpha281, which is preferentially used by conventional NKT cells. These NKT cells did not bias the TCR-Vbeta usage toward Vbeta8. These findings suggest that the large intestine is a site in which unconventional NKT cells carrying the CD8(+) phenotype (or DN CD4(-)8(-)) are abundant and that these cells are independent of MHC and MHC-like antigens.
    European Journal of Immunology 11/2001; 31(11):3361-9. DOI:10.1002/1521-4141(200111)31:11<3361::AID-IMMU3361>3.0.CO;2-Z · 4.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in early defense against viral infection. The cytotoxic activity of NK cells is increased by interferon-alpha/beta (IFN-alpha/beta), produced en masse in virally infected cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which IFN-alpha/beta contribute to the NK-cell-mediated antiviral response is not well understood. Here we provide evidence that the cytotoxicity of NK cells is enhanced by IFN-alpha/beta through induction of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Isolation and analysis of the murine TRAIL promoter revealed the presence of an IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE), which binds to the transcription factor ISGF3 (interferon stimulated gene factor-3). This promoter is indeed activated by IFN-beta in ISGF3-dependent manner. We also show that virally infected cells, but not uninfected cells, are susceptible to TRAIL-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro, and that the TRAIL expressed in NK cells is indeed crucial in limiting virus replication in vivo. Thus, our study reveals a new molecular link between IFN-alpha/beta signaling and activation of NK cells in antiviral response of the host.
    European Journal of Immunology 11/2001; 31(11):3138-46. DOI:10.1002/1521-4141(200111)31:11<3138::AID-IMMU3138>3.0.CO;2-B · 4.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The glycolipid alpha -galactosylceramide (alpha -GalCer), which is presented by CD1d and specifically activates Valpha 14 NKT cells, exerts a potent anti-metastatic effect when administered in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that alpha -GalCer administration led to rapid elimination of NKT cells by apoptosis in the liver and spleen, after they produced IFN-gamma and IL-4. In contrast, a more prolonged secretion of IFN-gamma was observed by liver and splenic NK cells after alpha -GalCer administration. Cytotoxic activity of liver mononuclear cells was not augmented 3h after alpha -GalCer administration, but was increased at 24 h when NKT cells were mostly depleted. The alpha -GalCer-induced cytotoxic activity was abolished in IFN-gamma -deficient and NK cell-depleted mice as well as CD1-deficient mice, suggesting that the alpha -Galcer-induced cytotoxicity was mainly mediated by IFN-gamma -activated NK cells. While the alpha -GalCer-induced cytotoxicity in vitro was mostly perforin dependent, anti-metastatic effect of alpha -GalCer was impaired in NK cell-depleted or IFN-gamma -deficient mice but not in perforin-deficient mice. Collectively, these results indicated that the anti-metastatic effect of alpha -GalCer is mainly mediated by NK cells, which are activated secondarily by IFN-gamma produced by alpha -GalCer-activated NKT cells, in a perforin-independent manner.
    European Journal of Immunology 07/2001; 31(6):1720-7. DOI:10.1002/1521-4141(200106)31:6<1720::AID-IMMU1720>3.3.CO;2-L · 4.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The liver remains a hematopoietic organ after birth and can produce all leukocyte lineages from resident hematopoietic stem cells. Hepatocytes produce acute phase proteins and complement in bacterial infections. Liver Kupffer cells are activated by various bacterial stimuli, including bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and bacterial superantigens, and produce interleukin (IL)-12. IL-12 and other monokines (IL- 18 etc.) produced by Kupffer cells activate liver natural killer (NK) cells and NK1.1 Ag+ T cells to produce interferon-gamma and thereby acquire cytotoxicity against tumors and microbe-infected cells. These liver leukocytes and the T helper 1 immune responses induced by them thus play a crucial role in the first line of defense against bacterial infections and hematogenous tumor metastases. However, if this defense system is inadequately activated, shock associated with multiple organ failure takes place. Activated liver NK1.1 Ag+ T cells and NK cells also cause hepatocyte injury. NK1.1 Ag+ T cells and another T-cell subset with an intermediate T-cell receptor, CD 122+CD8+ T cells, can develop independently of thymic epithelial cells. Liver NK cells and NK1.1 Ag+ T cells physiologically develop in situ from their precursors, presumably due to bacterial antigens brought from the intestine via the portal vein. NK cells activated by bacterial superantigens or LPS are also probably involved in the vascular endothelial injury in Kawasaki disease.
    Immunological Reviews 05/2000; 174:35-46. DOI:10.1034/j.1600-0528.2002.017404.x · 12.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OX40 (CD134) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily first identified as a rat T cell activation marker. We previously identified the rat ligand for OX40 (OX40L) by molecular cloning. In the present study, we newly generated an anti-rat OX40L mAb (ATM-2) that can inhibit the binding of OX40 to rat OX40L and thus efficiently inhibits the T cell costimulatory activity of rat OX40L. Flow cytometric analyses using ATM-2 and an anti-rat OX40 mAb (MRC OX40) indicated that OX40 was inducible on splenic CD4(+) T cells by stimulation with immobilized anti-CD3 mAb, while OX40L was not expressed on resting or activated T cells. OX40L was expressed on splenic B cells after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), but not on peritoneal macrophages. Interestingly, splenic dendritic cells (DC) expressed OX40L constitutively, which was further upregulated by LPS stimulation. The potent costimulatory activities of splenic DC for anti-CD3-stimulated rat CD4(+) T cell proliferation and cytokine (IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-10, and IL-13) production were substantially inhibited by ATM-2. These results indicated that OX40L is expressed on professional antigen-presenting cells (APC), and may be involved in humoral immune responses via T-B interaction and in cellular immune responses via T-DC interaction in the rat system.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 05/2000; 270(3):1041-8. DOI:10.1006/bbrc.2000.2560 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Infection of inbred mouse strains with Leishmania major is a well characterized model for analysis of T helper (Th)1 and Th2 cell development in vivo. In this study, to address the role of costimulatory molecules CD27, CD30, 4-1BB, and OX40, which belong to the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, in the development of Th1 and Th2 cells in vivo, we administered monoclonal antibody (mAb) against their ligands, CD70, CD30 ligand (L), 4-1BBL, and OX40L, to mice infected with L. major. Whereas anti-CD70, anti-CD30L, and anti-4-1BBL mAb exhibited no effect in either susceptible BALB/c or resistant C57BL/6 mice, the administration of anti-OX40L mAb abrogated progressive disease in BALB/c mice. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that OX40 was expressed on CD4(+) T cells and OX40L was expressed on CD11c(+) dendritic cells in the popliteal lymph nodes of L. major-infected BALB/c mice. In vitro stimulation of these CD4(+) T cells showed that anti-OX40L mAb treatment resulted in substantially reduced production of Th2 cytokines. Moreover, this change in cytokine levels was associated with reduced levels of anti-L. major immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 and serum IgE. These results indicate that anti-OX40L mAb abrogated progressive leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice by suppressing the development of Th2 responses, substantiating a critical role of OX40-OX40L interaction in Th2 development in vivo.
    Journal of Experimental Medicine 02/2000; 191(2):375-80. DOI:10.1084/jem.191.2.375 · 13.91 Impact Factor
  • Hiroaki Morita · Kazuyoshi Takeda · Hideo Yagita · Ko Okumura
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    ABSTRACT: Leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)), which is an arachidonic acid metabolite produced by the 5-lipoxygenase pathway and a well-characterized chemical mediator of inflammation, has been proposed to be an immune response modulator. Here we showed the constitutive expression of the LTB(4) receptor (LTB(4)R) in resting and activated T cells. We found that the LTB(4)R antagonist inhibited T cell proliferation induced by Con A, immobilized anti-CD3 mAb, or IL-2. This inhibitory effect was abolished by addition of LTB(4)R agonist. The LTB(4)R antagonist inhibited IL-2, IFN-gamma, and IL-4 production by anti-CD3-stimulated T cells and also inhibited IL-12-induced IFN-gamma production. Moreover, the LTB(4)R antagonist exerted an additive inhibitory effect to FK506 on T cell proliferation. These results suggest that LTB(4) is intrinsically involved in T cell activation to upregulate cytokine production and proliferation, and thus the LTB(4)R antagonist might be useful as an immunosuppressive agent.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 11/1999; 264(2):321-6. DOI:10.1006/bbrc.1999.1523 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peritoneal resident cells of mice normally contain small populations of NK cells and NK1.1(+) alphabetaT cells. These populations increased after either 3LL or EL4 tumor inoculations into the peritoneal cavity. In vivo depletion of NK cell alone by anti-asialo GM1 (ASGM1) Ab significantly decreased survival time of tumor-injected mice, while depletion of both NK cells and NK1.1(+) T cells by anti-NK 1.1 Ab greatly shortened mouse survival time. NK1. 1(+) T cells in peritoneal cavity consist of a larger proportion of double-negative T cells and smaller populations of CD4(+) T cells and Vbeta8(+) T cells compared with liver NK1.1(+) T cells and normally lack Vbeta2(+) T cells. Tumor inoculation induced rapid IL-12 and IFN-gamma mRNA in tumor-infiltrating mononuclear cells (TIM). Although anti-NK1 Ab pretreatment in vivo abrogated IFN-gamma mRNA expression and IFN-gamma production of TIM, NK cell depletion alone by anti-ASGM1 Ab pretreatment retained IFN-gamma mRNA expression and partly inhibited IFN-gamma production of TIM. Peritoneal NK cells as well as NK1.1(+) T cells but not NK1.1(-) T cells of 3LL cell- or EL4 cell-injected mice showed cytotoxicities against the same tumor cells. Further, either anti-IL-12 Ab or anti-IFN-gamma Ab ip injection significantly shortened EL4 cell-inoculated mouse survival time. Our findings suggest that peritoneal macrophages activated by tumors produce IL-12 which activates NK cells and NK1.1(+) T cells to produce IFN-gamma and both NK cells and NK1.1(+) T cells are important in suppressing the growth of the intraperitoneal tumors.
    Cellular Immunology 06/1999; 193(2):219-25. DOI:10.1006/cimm.1999.1477 · 1.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: IL-12 exerts a potent anti-tumor effect, which is possibly mediated by multiple mechanisms including activation of NK and NKT cells, induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and inhibition of angiogenesis. In the present study, we characterized the cytotoxic effector cells and mechanisms responsible for the anti-metastatic effect of IL-12. Administration of IL-12 had a comparable inhibitory effect on experimental lung metastasis of B16 melanoma cells in wild-type C57BL/6 mice and RAG-2-/- mice that lack T and NKT cells, which was abolished by depletion of NK cells. Cytotoxic activity of liver and splenic mononuclear cells against B16 was induced by IL-12 administration in RAG-2-/- mice at a level comparable to that in wild-type mice, which was also abolished by depletion of NK cells. Moreover, the anti-metastatic effect of IL-12 was abrogated by perforin deficiency, but not by Fas ligand deficiency, in association with a lack of IL-12-induced cytotoxic activity of liver and splenic mononuclear cells against B16. These results suggest that perforin-dependent cytotoxicity of IL-12-activated NK cells is sufficient for the anti-metastatic effect of IL-12.
    European Journal of Immunology 04/1999; 29(4):1390-6. DOI:10.1002/(SICI)1521-4141(199904)29:04<1390::AID-IMMU1390>3.0.CO;2-C · 4.52 Impact Factor
  • Osamu Shimozato · Kazuyoshi Takeda · Hideo Yagita · Ko Okumura
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    ABSTRACT: CD30, a member of the TNF receptor family, has been implicated in the activation of T cells and B cells. In the present study, we characterized the expression and function of murine CD30 ligand (mCD153) by utilizing mCD153 transfectants and a novel mAb against mCD153 (RM153), which can inhibit the binding of murine CD30 to mCD153. The mCD153 transfectants did not co-stimulate the proliferation of anti-CD3-stimulated naive T cells but enhanced the proliferation of anti-CD28-co-stimulated T cells. The mCD153 transfectants exhibited a potent co-stimulatory activity for proliferation of pre-activated T cells that expressed CD30 after anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 stimulation. In contrast to the CD30 expression on naive T cells that required anti-CD28 co-stimulation, mCD153 expression was observed on anti-CD3-stimulated T cells without the anti-CD28 co-stimulation, predominantly on CD4(+) T cells with a transient kinetics which peaked at 24 h but disappeared at 48 h. In contrast to the preferential expression of CD30 on Th2 cells, mCD153 was expressed on both Th1 and Th2 cells after anti-CD3 stimulation. These results indicated a differential regulation of CD30 and CD153 expression in T cells, which may be relevant to immuno-regulatory role of the CD30-CD153 interaction.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 04/1999; 256(3):519-26. DOI:10.1006/bbrc.1999.0336 · 2.28 Impact Factor
  • International Reviews Of Immunology 02/1997; 14(2-3):229-56. DOI:10.3109/08830189709116854 · 5.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Increasing evidence suggests that an intimate correlation may exist between the production of a cytokine, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the ability to metastasize spontaneously in the lungs in murine transplantable tumors. In the present study, we further examined the cytokine production by tumor cells with the ability to metastasize in the liver. Four out of 8 test tumors, which produced metastasis in the lungs but not in the liver, exhibited the ability to produce GM-CSF activity in culture. Three other tumors produced metastasis in the liver but not in the lungs. These tumor cells exhibited no ability to produce GM-CSF, but two of them expressed an interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA and also produced IL-6 activity in the culture fluids. One of the two IL-6-producing tumors and the remaining liver metastatic tumor produced interleukin-1 (IL-1) as revealed by bioassay and neutralization test. In the tumor cells producing pulmonary metastasis, neither IL-6 gene expression nor IL-1 production could be detected. The last test tumor, which produced no metastasis either in the lungs or liver, produced neither GM-CSF, IL-1 nor IL-6. Furthermore, injection of antisera reactive to recombinant murine IL-6 caused a marked decrease of the number of liver metastases of an IL-6-producing tumor, but not lung metastases of a GM-CSF-producing tumor, which could be markedly inhibited by injection of anti-recombinant murine GM-CSF sera. These results suggest the possibility that there may be a correlation between the cytokines produced by tumor cells and their organ specificity in spontaneous metastasis, and also indicate that these tumor models may provide a useful tool for studies on the role of cytokines in tumor metastasis.
    Cancer Science 10/1991; 82(11):1299 - 1308. DOI:10.1111/j.1349-7006.1991.tb01796.x · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using 14 transplantable murine tumors, we investigated a possible correlation between their ability to produce the cytokine GM-CSF and the spontaneous metastatic potential when mice were subcutaneously inoculated. The following results were obtained: (1) seven tumors, which produced severe pulmonary metastases and metastatic swelling of lymph nodes, exhibited the ability to produce GM-CSF activity in culture. The cell population analysis revealed that the cells producing GM-CSF were tumor cells themselves, but that contaminating macrophages/granulocytes and T lymphocytes did not produce GM-CSF. The mRNA for GM-CSF was also found in all of these highly metastatic tumors tested. In mice inoculated with a highly metastatic tumor, the GM-CSF mRNA was also found in lungs; (2) in 3 other tumors, which produced histological but not macroscopical pulmonary metastases, no GM-CSF activity could be detected in the culture fluids. GM-CSF mRNA was, however, detected in the tumor cells in the presence of an mRNA-stabilizing agent, cycloheximide, suggesting the possibility that the tumor cells of this type were transcribing GM-CSF gene, and secreting it in undetectable levels; (3) in culture of the 4 remaining poorly or non-metastatic tumors, neither CSF activity nor GM-CSF mRNA could be detected even in the presence of cycloheximide. GM-CSF mRNA was also not found in lungs of tumor-bearing mice. Our results indicate that there may be a correlation between GM-CSF gene expression in tumor cells and spontaneous metastases.
    International Journal of Cancer 02/1991; 47(3):413 - 420. DOI:10.1002/ijc.2910470318 · 5.01 Impact Factor