Lauren E Andersen

University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States

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Publications (3)12.77 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Human protein kinases (HPKs) have profound effects on cellular responses. To better understand the role of HPKs and the signaling networks that influence influenza virus replication, a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen of 720 HPKs was performed. From the screen, 17 HPKs (NPR2, MAP3K1, DYRK3, EPHA6, TPK1, PDK2, EXOSC10, NEK8, PLK4, SGK3, NEK3, PANK4, ITPKB, CDC2L5 (CDK13), CALM2, PKN3, and HK2) were validated as essential for A/WSN/33 influenza virus replication, and 6 HPKs (CDK13, HK2, NEK8, PANK4, PLK4 and SGK3) were identified as vital for both A/WSN/33 and A/New Caledonia/20/99 influenza virus replication. These HPKs were found to affect multiple host pathways and regulated by miRNAs induced during infection. Using a panel of miRNA agonists and antagonists, miR-149* was found to regulate NEK8 expression, miR-548d-3p was found to regulate MAPK1 transcript expression, and miRs -1228 and -138 to regulate CDK13 expression. Up-regulation of miR-34c induced PLK4 transcript and protein expression and enhanced influenza virus replication, while miR-34c inhibition reduced viral replication. These findings identify HPKs important for influenza viral replication and show the miRNAs that govern their expression.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(6):e66796. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Influenza virus encodes only 11 viral proteins but replicates in a broad range of avian and mammalian species by exploiting host cell functions. Genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) has proven to be a powerful tool for identifying the host molecules that participate in each step of virus replication. Meta-analysis of findings from genome-wide RNAi screens has shown influenza virus to be dependent on functional nodes in host cell pathways, requiring a wide variety of molecules and cellular proteins for replication. Because rapid evolution of the influenza A viruses persistently complicates the effectiveness of vaccines and therapeutics, a further understanding of the complex host cell pathways coopted by influenza virus for replication may provide new targets and strategies for antiviral therapy. RNAi genome screening technologies together with bioinformatics can provide the ability to rapidly identify specific host factors involved in resistance and susceptibility to influenza virus, allowing for novel disease intervention strategies.
    The FASEB Journal 01/2012; 26(4):1372-86. · 5.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Influenza A virus causes seasonal epidemics and periodic pandemics threatening the health of millions of people each year. Vaccination is an effective strategy for reducing morbidity and mortality, and in the absence of drug resistance, the efficacy of chemoprophylaxis is comparable to that of vaccines. However, the rapid emergence of drug resistance has emphasized the need for new drug targets. Knowledge of the host cell components required for influenza replication has been an area targeted for disease intervention. In this study, the human protease genes required for influenza virus replication were determined and validated using RNA interference approaches. The genes validated as critical for influenza virus replication were ADAMTS7, CPE, DPP3, MST1, and PRSS12, and pathway analysis showed these genes were in global host cell pathways governing inflammation (NF-κB), cAMP/calcium signaling (CRE/CREB), and apoptosis. Analyses of host microRNAs predicted to govern expression of these genes showed that eight miRNAs regulated gene expression during virus replication. These findings identify unique host genes and microRNAs important for influenza replication providing potential new targets for disease intervention strategies.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(5):e37169. · 3.53 Impact Factor