Jonathan Hoskins

The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States

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Publications (7)3.21 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Study Design. Single center retrospective study.Objective. To identify predictors of length of stay (LOS) days in patients undergoing 1 level minimally invasive (MIS) transforaminal interbody fusions (TLIF).Summary of Background Data. Recent studies suggest intra-operative fluid administration; colloid and crystalloid administration amongst other intra-operative variables may prolong length of stay days and increase complications. Therefore, an understanding of which pre-operative, intra-operative and immediate post-operative parameters best predict immediate length of stay days will help risk-stratify patients and guide decision making.Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 104 patients undergoing a MIS TLIF at one institution between 2008 and 2010. Two groups were selected based on the time of discharge. Group I consisted of patients discharged within 24 hours after surgery and Group II consisted of patients discharged more than 24 hours after surgery. Multiple regression analysis was performed to determine which pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative variables were independent predictors of length of stay days.Results. Seventy- eight patients (75%) with a LOS greater than 24 hours had significantly higher estimated blood loss, received more crystalloids, had higher total fluids, longer surgical time, lower end of case temperature, lower hemoglobin during hospitalization, and a lower pre-op narcotic use. Multiple regression analysis showed that significant predictors of increased length of stay were: post-operative creatinine, VAS score, intra-operative colloids, fluids input at end of surgical case, crystalloid to colloid ratio, fluid balance, oxycontin use, mean percentage of FiO2, and pre-operative hemoglobin.Conclusions. Patients undergoing 1 level MIS TLIF for degenerative conditions can overall expect a short LOS post-operatively. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative and immediate post-operative factors can prolong the length of stay in this group. This information should help the surgical team in optimizing their intra-operative patient management.
    Spine 05/2012; · 2.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Minimally invasive surgical approaches have been advocated to approach ventrolateral thoracolumbar pathology. This article describes our technique for performing minimally invasive surgical thoracolumbar corpectomy and reconstruction. Twenty-five consecutive patients at a single institution were treated between 2006 and 2010 for a variety of diagnoses including tumors, infections, and trauma. Treatment variables, including operating time, estimated blood loss, number of levels treated, and complications, were collected, as were visual analog scale (VAS) scores for pain.Surgical times (mean, 188.5 minutes) and blood loss (mean, 423 mL) reflect a significant improvement over standard open corpectomy procedures. More than 60% of patients did not need blood products after the corpectomy procedure because substantial blood loss encountered during an open exposure to the spine was obviated. Similarly, operative times and anesthetic load was minimal enough for ≥80% of our patients to be extubated immediately after the corpectomy procedure. A 62% decrease in self-reported VAS scores was observed. No wound complications or radiographic evidence of implant subsidence or failure were observed at last follow-up.The advantages of the minimally invasive approach for corpectomies of the thoracolumbar spine were that an access surgeon was not needed; tissue dissection and surgical exposure were reduced, improving VAS scores postoperatively; and blood loss and operative times were minimized, preventing hemodynamic deterioration in these complex cases. Corpectomies may be performed in this fashion safely, with excellent pain relief and without many of the morbidities and difficulties associated with conventional open procedures.
    Orthopedics 01/2012; 35(1):e74-9. · 1.05 Impact Factor
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    Jonathan Hoskins, Paul B. Lewis, Steve Smith, Kern Singh
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    Contemporary Spine Surgery. 08/2011; 12(9):1–8.
  • Safdar N. Khan, Jonathan Hoskins, Kern Singh
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    Contemporary Spine Surgery. 06/2011; 12(7):1–5.
  • Jonathan Hoskins, Ryan Zaglama, Steven Smith, Kern Singh
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    Contemporary Spine Surgery. 01/2011; 12(2):1–5.
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    Contemporary Spine Surgery. 12/2010; 12(1):1–6.
  • Kern Singh, Daniel Park, Jonathan Hoskins
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    Contemporary Spine Surgery. 10/2010; 11(11):1–5.

Publication Stats

2 Citations
3.21 Total Impact Points

Top Journals

Institutions

  • 2012
    • The Ohio State University
      • Department of Orthopaedics
      Columbus, OH, United States
    • Rush University Medical Center
      • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
      Chicago, Illinois, United States