Kayoko Asakura

Kyoto University, Kyoto, Kyoto-fu, Japan

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Publications (5)12.96 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The acute analgesic effect of tramadol has been extensively investigated; however, its long-term effect on neuropathic pain has not been well clarified. In this study, we examined the effects of repeated administration of tramadol on partial sciatic nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain in rats. Each drug was administered once daily from 0 - 6 days (preventive effect) or 7 - 14 days (alleviative effect) after the surgery. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated just before (preventive or alleviative effect) and 1 h after (analgesic effect) drug administration. Like morphine, first administration of tramadol (20 mg/kg) showed an acute analgesic effect on the developed mechanical allodynia, which was diminished by naloxone. Like amitriptyline, repeated administration of tramadol showed preventive and alleviative effects on the mechanical allodynia that was diminished by yohimbine, but not naloxone. The alleviative effects of tramadol lasted even after drug cessation or in the presence of yohimbine. Repeated administration of tramadol increased the dopamine β-hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the spinal cord. Furthermore, tramadol inhibited the nerve ligation-induced activation of spinal astrocytes, which was reduced by yohimbine. These results suggest that tramadol has both μ-opioid receptor-mediated acute analgesic and α2-adrenoceptor-mediated preventive and alleviative effects on neuropathic pain, and the latter is due to α2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of astrocytic activation.
    Journal of Pharmacological Sciences 02/2014; · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Neuropathic pain is a pathological pain condition that often results from peripheral nerve injury. Several lines of evidence suggest that neuroinflammation mediated by the interaction between immune cells and neurons plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a nonselective Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel that acts as a sensor for reactive oxygen species. Recent evidence suggests that TRPM2 expressed on immune cells plays an important role in immune and inflammatory responses. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM2 expressed on immune and glial cells in neuropathic pain. TRPM2 deficiency attenuated pain behaviors (mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain behaviors) in various kinds of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, but not in nociceptive pain models. In peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain models, TRPM2 deficiency diminished infiltration of neutrophils mediated through CXCL2 production from macrophages around the injured peripheral nerve and activation of spinal microglia, suggesting that TRPM2 expressed on macrophages and microglia aggravates peripheral and spinal pronociceptive inflammatory responses. Furthermore, we examined the infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the injured nerve and spinal cord using bone marrow chimeric mice by crossing wildtype and TRPM2-knockout mice. The results suggest that TRPM2 plays an important role in the infiltration of peripheral immune cells, particularly macrophages, into the spinal cord, rather than into the injured nerves. The spinal infiltration of macrophages mediated by TRPM2 may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.
    YAKUGAKU ZASSHI 01/2014; 134(3):379-86. · 0.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent evidence suggests that transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) expressed in immune cells plays an important role in immune and inflammatory responses. We recently reported that TRPM2 expressed in macrophages and spinal microglia contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory and neuropathic pain aggravating peripheral and central pronociceptive inflammatory responses in mice. To further elucidate the contribution of TRPM2 expressed by peripheral immune cells to neuropathic pain, we examined the development of peripheral nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain and the infiltration of immune cells (particularly macrophages) into the injured nerve and spinal cord by using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice by crossing wildtype (WT) and TRPM2-knockout (TRPM2-KO) mice. Four types of BM chimeric mice were prepared, in which irradiated WT or TRPM2-KO recipient mice were transplanted with either WT-or TRPM2-KO donor mouse-derived green fluorescence protein-positive (GFP(+)) BM cells (TRPM2(BM+/Rec+), TRPM2(BM-/Rec+), TRPM2(BM+/Rec-), and TRPM2(BM-/Rec-) mice). Mechanical allodynia induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation observed in TRPM2(BM+/Rec+) mice was attenuated in TRPM2(BM-/Rec+), TRPM2(BM+/Rec-), and TRPM2(BM-/Rec-) mice. The numbers of GFP(+) BM-derived cells and Iba1/GFP double-positive macrophages in the injured sciatic nerve did not differ among chimeric mice 14 days after the nerve injury. In the spinal cord, the number of GFP(+) BM-derived cells, particularly GFP/Iba1 double-positive macrophages, was significantly decreased in the three TRPM2-KO chimeric mouse groups compared with TRPM2(BM+/Rec+) mice. However, the numbers of GFP(-)/Iba1(+) resident microglia did not differ among chimeric mice. These results suggest that TRPM2 plays an important role in the infiltration of peripheral immune cells, particularly macrophages, into the spinal cord, rather than the infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the injured nerves and activation of spinal-resident microglia. The spinal infiltration of macrophages mediated by TRPM2 may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(7):e66410. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Folia Pharmacologica Japonica 01/2013; 142(5):215-220.
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    ABSTRACT: Accumulating evidence suggests that neuroimmune interactions contribute to pathological pain. Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a nonselective Ca²⁺-permeable cation channel that acts as a sensor for reactive oxygen species. TRPM2 is expressed abundantly in immune cells and is important in inflammatory processes. The results of the present study show that TRPM2 plays a crucial role in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. While wild-type and TRPM2 knock-out mice showed no difference in their basal sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimulation, nocifensive behaviors in the formalin test were reduced in TRPM2 knock-out mice. In carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain and sciatic nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain models, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were attenuated in TRPM2 knock-out mice. Carrageenan-induced inflammation and sciatic nerve injury increased the expression of TRPM2 mRNA in the inflamed paw and around the injured sciatic nerve, respectively. TRPM2 deficiency diminished the infiltration of neutrophils and the production of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand-2 (CXCL2), a major chemokine that recruits neutrophils, but did not alter the recruitment of F4/80-positive macrophages in the inflamed paw or around the injured sciatic nerve. Microglial activation after nerve injury was suppressed in the spinal cord of TRPM2 knock-out mice. Furthermore, CXCL2 production and inducible nitric oxide synthase induction were diminished in cultured macrophages and microglia derived from TRPM2 knock-out mice. Together, these results suggest that TRPM2 expressed in macrophages and microglia aggravates peripheral and spinal pronociceptive inflammatory responses and contributes to the pathogenesis of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.
    Journal of Neuroscience 03/2012; 32(11):3931-41. · 6.91 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

19 Citations
12.96 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2013
    • Kyoto University
      • • Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      • • Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences / Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      Kyoto, Kyoto-fu, Japan