You-Chang Oh

Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Bucheon, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea

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Publications (8)18.12 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Oryeongsan (OR) is an herbal medication used in east-Asian traditional medicine to treat dysuresia, such as urinary frequency, hematuria, and dysuria due to renal disease and chronic nephritis. Recent studies showed that protective effect against acute gastric mucosal injury and an inhibitory effect on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway of OR. However, its effect on inflammation still remains unknown. In this study, to provide insight into the biological effects of OR, we investigated their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in the RAW 264.7 macrophage cells.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 07/2014; 14(1):242. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Palmultang (PM) is an herbal decoction that has been used to treat anorexia, anemia, general prostration, and weakness due to chronic illness since medieval times in Korea, China, and Japan. The present study focused on the inhibitory effects of PM on the production of inflammatory factors and on the activation of mechanisms in murine macrophages. PM suppressed the expression of nitric oxide (NO), inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory proteins by inhibiting nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways and by inducing heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression. Collectively, our results explain the anti-inflammatory effect and inhibitory mechanism of PM in macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS).
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences 01/2014; 15(5):8443-57. · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sosihotang (SO) is an herbal medication, which has been widely used to treat fever, chill and vomiting due to common cold in east-Asian countries. In this study, to provide insight into the effects of SO on inflammation, we investigated its effect on pro-inflammatory mediator production in RAW 264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. SO significantly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 as well as gene expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), its synthesizing enzyme. In addition, SO inhibited nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c- Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) phosphorylation. Furthermore, we found SO suppresses the production of NO and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed SO contains many active anti-inflammatory constituents such as liquiritigenin, baicalin, baicalein, glycyrrhizin and wogonin. We first elucidated the inhibitory mechanism of SO on inflammation induced by LPS in macrophage cells. Our results suggest SO has potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for various inflammatory diseases.
    Food and chemical toxicology: an international journal published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association 12/2012; · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Lycium Fruit has been used as a traditional drug for low back pain and chronic cough in east-Asian countries. However, inhibitory effects of Lycium Fruit water extract (LFWE) on inflammation remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of LFWE on pro-inflammatory mediator production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. LFWE inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin (PG) E₂, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 production as well as their synthesizing enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 gene expression. Furthermore, LFWE inhibited phosphorylations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) as well as suppression of IκBα degradation and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB upon LPS stimulation. In addition, LFWE suppressed NO, PGE₂, TNF-α and IL-6 production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Taken together, our results suggest that LFWE inhibits the production of various inflammatory mediators via blockade on the MAPKs and NF-κB pathways. This finding first explains the mechanism of anti-inflammatory effect by LFWE in LPS-stimulated macrophage cells.
    International immunopharmacology 04/2012; 13(2):181-9. · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Oyaksungisan (OY) has been used as a traditional drug in east-Asian countries. However, its effect on inflammation still remains unknown. In this study, to provide insight into the biological effects of OY and OY fermented by Lactobacillus, we investigated their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells. The investigation was focused on whether OY and fermented OYs could inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin (PG) E2 as well as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. We found that OY inhibits a little LPS-induced NO, PGE2, TNF-α and IL-6 productions as well as the expressions of iNOS and COX-2. Interestingly, the fermentation significantly increased its inhibitory effect on the expression of all pro-inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, the fermented OYs exhibited elevated inhibition on the translocation of NF-κB p65 through reduced IκBα degradation as well as the phosphorylations of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) MAPKs than untreated control or original OY. Finally, the fermentation by Lactobacillus potentiates the anti-inflammatory effect of OY by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK activity in the macrophage cells.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 03/2012; 12:17. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: KIOM-MA was recently reported as a novel herbal medicine effective for atopic dermatitis and asthma. In this study, we have demonstrated the inhibitory effect of KIOM-MA on proinflammatory mediator produced in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. KIOM-MA significantly inhibited the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) as well as nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Consistent with the inhibitory effect on PGE(2), KIOM-MA suppresses the LPS-induced migration of macrophages and gelatinase activity and the expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, KIOM-MA showed a strong suppressive effect on the inflammatory cytokines production such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). We also found that KIOM-MA inhibits the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and represses the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Taken together, we elucidated the mechanism of anti-inflammatory effect of KIOM-MA using RAW 264.7 cells stimulated by LPS.
    Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 01/2012; 2012:462383. · 1.72 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sipjeondaebotang (SJ) has been used as a traditional drug in east-Asian countries. In this study, to provide insight into the biological effects of SJ and SJ fermented by Lactobacillus, we investigated their effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages. The investigation was focused on whether SJ and fermented SJ could inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin (PG) E(2) and nitric oxide (NO) as well as the expressions of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. We found that SJ modestly inhibited LPS-induced PGE(2), NO and TNF-α production as well as the expressions of COX-2 and iNOS. Interestingly, fermentation significantly increased its inhibitory effect on the expression of all pro-inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, fermented SJ exhibited increased inhibition of p38 MAPK and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) MAPK phosphorylation as well as NF-κB p65 translocation by reduced IκBα degradation compared with either untreated controls or unfermented SJ. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed fermentation by Lactobacillus increases liquiritigenin and cinnamyl alcohol contained in SJ, which are known for their anti-inflammatory activities. Finally, SJ fermented by Lactobacillus exerted potent anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting MAPK and NF-κB signaling in RAW 264.7 cells.
    The American Journal of Chinese Medicine 01/2012; 40(4):813-31. · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Citrus Unshiu peel (CUP) has been traditionally used in East Asia as a drug for the treatment of vomiting and dyspepsia. However, its effects on inflammation remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of CUP on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. The research focused on determining whether CUP could inhibit the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as the secretion of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin (PG) E(2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. We found that CUP represses LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 gene expression as well as NO, PGE(2), TNF-α and IL-6 production. Additionally, CUP inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) MAPK, and suppressed IκBα degradation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Collectively, our results indicate that CUP inhibits the production of various inflammatory mediators via blockade of MAPK phosphorylation pursuant to the inhibition of IκBα degradation and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. These findings are the first to clarify the mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effect exerted by CUP in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells stimulated by inflammatory agents.
    The American Journal of Chinese Medicine 01/2012; 40(3):611-29. · 2.28 Impact Factor