Joanne Buzaglo

Treatment Research Institute, Philadelphia PA, Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States

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Publications (40)115.26 Total impact

  • Cancer Research 05/2015; 75(9 Supplement):P2-12-02-P2-12-02. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.SABCS14-P2-12-02 · 9.28 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Research 05/2015; 75(9 Supplement):P2-12-03-P2-12-03. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.SABCS14-P2-12-03 · 9.28 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Research 05/2015; 75(9 Supplement):P2-10-04-P2-10-04. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.SABCS14-P2-10-04 · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Qualitative studies have identified barriers to communication and informed decision making among breast cancer survivors making treatment decisions. The prevalence of these barriers is unknown. To quantify the need for decision support among breast cancer survivors. We surveyed 2,521 breast cancer survivors participating in an online registry hosted by the Cancer Support Community to find out what proportion of breast cancer patients: made decisions during their first visit with a specialist; received satisfactory information before that visit; asked questions and received responses; and endorsed expanded use of decision support. We received 1,017 (41%) responses and analyzed 917 surveys from women who lived in the United States. Most of the respondents recalled making treatment decisions during their first visit (52%). A minority (14%) received information before the first specialist visit. At least 25% of respondents rated their satisfaction below 7 on a scale of 10 for decision-making, information, and questions asked and answered. Respondents endorsed the need for assistance with obtaining information, listing questions, taking notes, and making audio-recordings of visits. The respondent sample skewed younger and had higher-stage cancer compared with all breast cancer survivors. Responses were subject to recall bias. Cancer survivors expressed gaps in their care with respect to reviewing information, asking questions, obtaining answers, and making decisions. Implementing decision and communication aids immediately upon diagnosis, when treatment decisions are being made, would address these gaps. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.
    03/2015; 13(3):104-12. DOI:10.12788/jcso.0116
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    ABSTRACT: The majority of cancer patients are treated in community cancer centers or private oncology practices, not at comprehensive and academic cancer centers; yet, little is known about the differences in patient experience across these practice settings with respect to patient engagement around treatment decision-making. To explore these differences and understand where there may be gaps in patient-centered care, we surveyed cancer patients and survivors who registered in the Cancer Experience Registry, an online initiative designed to track their psychosocial needs. In 2013, 788 registrants answered questions about their experience in getting support around treatment decision-making. The sample was 86.4% female and 90.9% Caucasian with median age 57; 70.0% had a college degree. 41.4% received treatment at an academic or comprehensive cancer center (A/CCC); 32.1% at a community hospital or cancer center; 26.5% at a private oncology practice. Respondents who received treatment at an A/CCC reported being more knowledgeable about treatment options (p=0.001) and more involved in the treatment decision making process (p<0.001). They also received more treatment decision support (p=0.024), were more likely to speak to their healthcare team about clinical trials (p<0.001) and were more satisfied with how much they participated in making the treatment decision (p=0.014). Findings suggest that cancer survivors who receive treatment at an A/CCC feel more involved, knowledgeable, and satisfied with the treatment decision making process than those who receive care elsewhere. Future efforts should target the development of innovative, patient-centered decision support programs that link patients to resources treated in community practice settings.
    142nd APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition 2014; 11/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose Internet support group (ISG) members benefit from receiving social support and, according to the helper therapy principle, by providing support to others. To test the mental health benefits of providing support to others, this trial compared the efficacy of a standard ISG (S-ISG) and an enhanced prosocial ISG (P-ISG). Methods A two-armed randomized controlled trial with 1-month pretest and post-test assessments was conducted with women (N ϭ 184) diagnosed in the past 36 months with nonmetastatic breast cancer who reported elevated anxiety or depression. Women were randomly assigned to either the S-ISG or P-ISG condition. Both conditions included six professionally facilitated live chat sessions (90-minute weekly sessions) and access to an asynchronous discussion board; P-ISG also included structured opportunities to help and encourage others. Results Relative to the S-ISG, participants in the P-ISG condition exhibited more supportive behaviors (emotional, informational, and companionate support), posted more messages that were other-focused and fewer that were self-focused, and expressed less negative emotion (P Ͻ .05). Relative to the S-ISG, participants in the P-ISG condition had a higher level of depression and anxiety symptoms after the intervention (P Ͻ .05). Conclusion Despite the successful manipulation of supportive behaviors, the P-ISG did not produce better mental health outcomes in distressed survivors of breast cancer relative to an S-ISG. The prosocial manipulation may have inadvertently constrained women from expressing their needs openly, and thus, they may not have had their needs fully met in the group. Helping others may not be beneficial as a treatment for distressed survivors of breast cancer.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 11/2014; 32. DOI:10.1200/JCO.2014.57.0093 · 17.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective This article describes the rigorous development process and initial feedback of the PRE-ACT (Preparatory Education About Clinical Trials) web-based- intervention designed to improve preparation for decision making in cancer clinical trials. Methods The multi-step process included stakeholder input, formative research, user testing and feedback. Diverse teams (researchers, advocates and developers) participated including content refinement, identification of actors, and development of video scripts. Patient feedback was provided in the final production period and through a vanguard group (N = 100) from the randomized trial. Results Patients/advocates confirmed barriers to cancer clinical trial participation, including lack of awareness and knowledge, fear of side effects, logistical concerns, and mistrust. Patients indicated they liked the tool's user-friendly nature, the organized and comprehensive presentation of the subject matter, and the clarity of the videos. Conclusion The development process serves as an example of operationalizing best practice approaches and highlights the value of a multi-disciplinary team to develop a theory-based, sophisticated tool that patients found useful in their decision making process. Practice Implications. Best practice approaches can be addressed and are important to ensure evidence-based tools that are of value to patients and supports the usefulness of a process map in the development of e-health tools.
    Patient Education and Counseling 07/2014; 96(1). DOI:10.1016/j.pec.2014.04.009 · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective was to test the discriminatory power of a 25-item distress screening tool for use among cancer survivors. We used a measure of item discrimination to determine which items perform better than others at identifying those at greatest risk of distress. A total of 251 members (90 % female, median age 57 years) of a community-based cancer support organization completed a web-based distress screening tool. Participants were asked to rate each of 25 items according to the question "Today, how concerned are you aboutaEuro broken vertical bar?" using a five-point Likert scale (0 not at all to 4 very seriously concerned). An overall distress score was calculated as the sum of items rated at or above two for somewhat concerned. Participants were categorized as high scorers (a parts per thousand yen13, n = 59) and low scorers (a parts per thousand currency sign4, n = 60). The item discrimination index (IDI) was calculated for each item as the percentage difference in concerned (somewhat or greater) responses between high and low scorers. Items with the greatest discriminatory power (IDI a parts per thousand yen0.8) were as follows: changes or disruptions in work, school or home life; feeling sad or depressed; feeling too tired to do the things you need or want to do; worrying about the future and what lies ahead; and feeling nervous or afraid. Conversely, items with the lowest IDI included considering taking your own life; eating and nutrition; tobacco or substance use; and transportation to treatment and appointments. The results highlight, among 25 items of a community-based distress screening tool, items with the greatest discriminatory power to identify cancer survivors with psychosocial distress. Results suggest targeted screening items to identify those most at risk for distress and priority areas for support services.
    Quality of Life Research 06/2014; 23(10). DOI:10.1007/s11136-014-0742-4 · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: A model of psychosocial care specific for patients with multiple myeloma and their caregivers has not yet been proposed. We sought to develop a model of care that considers the specific profile of this disease. Method: The authors, representing a multidisciplinary care team, met in December of 2012 to identify a model of psychosocial care for patients with multiple myeloma and their caregivers. This model was determined by consensus during the meeting and via total agreement following the meeting. The meeting was sponsored by Onyx Pharmaceuticals. Results: The need for targeted psychosocial care for the multiple myeloma patient and caregiver throughout the disease process is essential to ensure quality of life and optimal treatment outcomes. We propose herein the first known model of care for the treatment of multiple myeloma that engages both the patient and their caregivers. Significance of results: Innovative partnerships between psychosocial providers and other entities such as pharmaceutical companies can maximize resources for comprehensive program development. This manuscript proposes a model of care that promotes active engagement in therapies for multiple myeloma while engaging the individual patient and their family caregivers. This treatment approach must be evidence based in terms of distress screening tools, comprehensive psychosocial assessments, and, most importantly, in the interventions and measurements of response that clinicians apply to this population.
    Palliative and Supportive Care 06/2014; DOI:10.1017/S1478951514000649 · 0.98 Impact Factor
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    Vicki Kennedy, Joanne Buzaglo, Sara Goldberger
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    ABSTRACT: presented at the american society of hematology annual meeting; december 6–9, 2014; san francisco, ca scan this code to receive a pdf of the poster. you can download a free Qr code reader at www.2dscan.com. IntroductIon • There is a growing awareness of the importance of integrating psychosocial care into routine practice in oncology 1 – New American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer accreditation standards require that patients with cancer be screened for psychosocial distress as a part of an initiative to treat the "whole patient" and ensure quality care 2 • Distress screening at pivotal points along the disease continuum can identify problems before a crisis event occurs, allow patients to voice concerns and gain information, and improve the use of healthcare resources 3 – While up to 40% of patients experience significant levels of distress, fewer than 10% of patients actually use psychosocial supportive services, often due to lack of awareness and access 4 • While screening is a new requirement in 2015, a recent survey found that only about 50% of patients in academic centers reported that they were asked about distress, and substantially fewer were asked about distress if they were treated in a nonacademic setting (where most patients are treated) 5 – A gap in care remains as 21% of patients who were asked about distress did not receive a referral to supportive services 5 • Pharmaceutical patient assistance programs are traditionally overlooked as a critical access point for psychosocial care – These programs are provided to assist patients in gaining access to medication, as well as with reimbursement for medications, but they often have limited knowledge about how to help patients and their caregivers with psychosocial distress • By integrating distress screening, referral, and follow-up services as part of a model patient access program, patient access to psychosocial care, levels of distress, and satisfaction with care have been improved • The Cancer Support Community (CSC) is a global nonprofit organization that provides evidence-based support programs to patients and families. CSC collaborated with Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., an Amgen subsidiary, to be part of the integrated patient assistance program Onyx Pharmaceuticals 360™ (Onyx 360) to screen and refer patients and caregivers facing advanced multiple myeloma (MM) for psychosocial services – Unlike standard reimbursement programs, the goal of this innovative program is to deliver integrated biopsychosocial care with reimbursement assistance • We report results on the impact of distress screening on the use of resources offered by Onyx 360 and the effect of these resources on patient distress levels over time methods • The Onyx 360 program was initiated in 2012, and a brief distress screening tool was introduced in late December 2013 – Patients with advanced MM were enrolled in Onyx 360 after contacting the program and speaking with an oncology nurse advocate or after being referred to Onyx 360 by a caregiver or healthcare provider • Patients were asked 4 distress screening questions by an Onyx 360 oncology nurse advocate during an initial phone call: – On a scale from 0 to 10, where "0" is the lowest level of distress and "10" is the highest level of distress, how would you rate: 1. Your overall level of distress today? 2. Your level of concern about practical issues such as home care, transportation, finances, etc? 3. Your level of concern about family, work, or home life? 4. Your level of concern about emotional issues or coping with MM? • For each screening question, the reported distress level was classified into 1 of the following categories: – A distress level of 0 to 3 was considered low – A distress level of 4 to 6 was considered moderate – A distress level of 7 to 10 was considered high • After completing baseline distress screening, patients were given the opportunity to enroll in Onyx 360 services, which include reimbursement and clinical support, transportation assistance, and real-time referrals to key resources, including the Chronic Disease Fund, the International Myeloma Foundation, the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, and the CSC (figure 1) – Consenting patients and caregivers were transferred to CSC, whose licensed mental health professionals conducted further assessment and offered patients and caregivers free supportive counseling, resource referral, group support, and treatment decision counseling • Patients were scheduled to be rescreened with the 4 questions approximately 30 days after the initial call • Patients were evaluated for changes in levels of distress between the initial and follow-up distress screening calls if they met the following criteria: – New to Onyx 360 at the time of the initial call – Reported moderate or high levels of distress for at least 1 screening question during the initial call – Completed a follow-up call – Answered the same screening questions on the initial and follow-up calls acKnoWledgments
    American Society of Hematology, San Francisco, CA; 06/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Low-income, inner-city women bear a disproportionate burden of cervical cancer in both incidence and mortality rates in the United States, largely because of low adherence to follow-up recommendations after an abnormal cervical cytology result in the primary care setting. The goals of the present study were to delineate the theory-based psychosocial barriers underlying these persistent low follow-up rates and their sociodemographic correlates. Guided by a well-validated psychosocial theory of health behaviors, this cross-sectional, correlational study assessed the barriers to follow-up adherence among underserved women (N = 210) who received an abnormal cervical cytology result. Participants were recruited through an inner-city hospital colposcopy clinic, and were assessed by telephone prior to the colposcopy appointment. Participants were largely of African American race (82.2%), lower than high school completion education (58.7%), single, never married (67.3%), and without full-time employment (64.1%). Knowledge barriers were most often endorsed (68%, M = 3.22), followed by distress barriers (64%, M = 3.09), and coping barriers (36%, M = 2.36). Forty-six percent reported more than one barrier category. Less education and being unemployed were correlated with higher knowledge barriers (P < .0001 and P < .01, respectively) and more coping barriers (P < .05 and P < .05, respectively). Women who were younger than 30 years displayed greater distress barriers (P < .05). In the primary care setting, assessing and addressing knowledge and distress barriers after feedback of an abnormal cervical cytology result may improve adherence to follow-up recommendations. The use of structured counseling protocols and referral to navigational and other resources may facilitate this process and thereby reduce disparities in cervical cancer.
    04/2014; DOI:10.1177/2150131914529307
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    ABSTRACT: Patient participation in cancer clinical trials is low. Little is known about attitudinal barriers to participation, particularly among patients who may be offered a trial during an imminent initial oncology consult. The aims of the present study were to confirm the presence of proposed subscales of a recently developed cancer clinical trial attitudinal barriers measure, describe the most common cancer clinical trials attitudinal barriers, and evaluate socio-demographic, medical and financial factors associated with attitudinal barriers. A total of 1256 patients completed a survey assessing demographic factors, perceived financial burden, prior trial participation and attitudinal barriers to clinical trials participation. Results of a factor analysis did not confirm the presence of the proposed four attitudinal barriers subscale/factors. Rather, a single factor represented the best fit to the data. The most highly-rated barriers were fear of side-effects, worry about health insurance and efficacy concerns. Results suggested that less educated patients, patients with non-metastatic disease, patients with no previous oncology clinical trial participation, and patients reporting greater perceived financial burden from cancer care were associated with higher barriers. These patients may need extra attention in terms of decisional support. Overall, patients with fewer personal resources (education, financial issues) report more attitudinal barriers and should be targeted for additional decisional support.
    European Journal of Cancer Care 01/2014; 24(1). DOI:10.1111/ecc.12180 · 1.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: As non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatments improve and patients live longer, it is important to develop interventions to help patients live fuller lives. We sought to identify key components of quality of life (QOL) in determining therapeutic decision making and overall value of life extension in patients with NSCLC.
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    ABSTRACT: This study used the Ottawa Decision Support Framework to evaluate a model examining associations between clinical trial knowledge, attitudinal barriers to participating in clinical trials, clinical trial self-efficacy, and clinical trial preparedness among 1256 cancer patients seen for their first outpatient consultation at a cancer center. As an exploratory aim, moderator effects for gender, race/ethnicity, education, and metastatic status on associations in the model were evaluated. . Patients completed measures of cancer clinical trial knowledge, attitudinal barriers, self-efficacy, and preparedness. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to evaluate whether self-efficacy mediated the association between knowledge and barriers with preparedness. . The SEM explained 26% of the variance in cancer clinical trial preparedness. Self-efficacy mediated the associations between attitudinal barriers and preparedness, but self-efficacy did not mediate the knowledge-preparedness relationship. . Findings partially support the Ottawa Decision Support Framework and suggest that assessing patients' level of self-efficacy may be just as important as evaluating their knowledge and attitudes about cancer clinical trials.
    Medical Decision Making 11/2013; 34(4). DOI:10.1177/0272989X13511704 · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study explored the impact of a tailored telephone counseling intervention on increasing follow-up adherence after an abnormal Pap smear result among low-income, minority women, which may reduce cervical cancer disparity. Participants (N=211) were randomly assigned to receive: (1) a telephone reminder that included an assessment of barriers to adherence, as well as counseling tailored to the barriers elicited; (2) telephone reminder and barriers assessment, followed by a mailed home tailored barriers print brochure; or (3) enhanced standard care comprising telephone reminder and barriers assessment. Assessments were obtained at initial contact and 1-week later, as well as at 6- and 12-months after the initial colposcopy. The telephone counseling group showed greater adherence to follow-up recommendations than did the combined other two groups (p<0.05). For the initial colposcopy, tailored telephone barriers counseling was more effective among women with a high school education or less. Tailored telephone barriers counseling improves adherence to initial colposcopy, as well as to longer-term medical follow-up, among low-income, inner-city women. Dissemination of barriers counseling into ongoing telephone reminder calls and contacts may decrease disparities in cancer outcomes, especially among women with less than post-secondary education.
    Patient Education and Counseling 08/2013; 93(3). DOI:10.1016/j.pec.2013.08.008 · 2.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Cancer Support Community (CSC) provides psychosocial support to people facing cancer in community settings. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility, effectiveness, and fidelity of the Situation-Choices-Objectives-People-Evaluation-Decisions (SCOPED) question-listing intervention at three CSC sites. Between August 2008 and August 2011, the Program Director at each CSC site implemented question-listing, while measuring patient distress, anxiety, and self-efficacy before and after each intervention. We analyzed the quantitative results using unadjusted statistical tests and reviewed qualitative comments by patients and the case notes of Program Directors to assess compatibility and fidelity. Program Directors implemented question-listing with 77 blood cancer patients. Patients reported decreased distress (p = 0.009) and anxiety (p = 0.005) and increased self-efficacy (p < 0.001). Patients and Program Directors endorsed the intervention as compatible with CSC's mission and approach and feasible to implement with high fidelity. CSC effectively translated SCOPED question-listing into practice in the context of its community-based psychosocial support services at three sites.
    06/2013; 3(2):162-71. DOI:10.1007/s13142-012-0186-8
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The purpose was to test the psychometric properties of a 36-item community-based problem-related distress screening tool, among 319 cancer survivors recruited across 14 affiliates of the Cancer Support Community. METHODS: Internal reliability was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Test-retest reliability was assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Concurrent validity was determined by correlations with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General Well-Being Scale (FACT-G), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Distress Thermometer (DT) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis using the CES-D (≥16) and DT (≥4) as the criterion. Non-parametric analysis of variance was used to establish discriminant validity. RESULTS: The distress screener demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and strong test-retest reliability (ICC ≥ 0.75). Summary scores of the distress screener correlated substantially with the FACT-G (R(2)  = 0.58, p < 0.001), CES-D (R(2)  = 0.48, p < 0.001), and DT (R(2)  = 0.35, p < 0.001) indicating strong concurrent validity and were able to discriminate groups of clinical relevance. ROC analyses showed a cutoff score of 8 for problem items rated ≥3 had optimal sensitivity and specificity relative to the CES-D and DT. CONCLUSIONS: The distress screener shows strong psychometric properties and can be considered a valuable community-based instrument to screen for psychological distress related to social, emotional, physical, and other patient-related symptoms and problems. This study is the first to address the chasm between hospital and community-based screening by validating a community-based instrument and has begun to demonstrate the feasibility of screening in the community. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Psycho-Oncology 06/2013; 22(6). DOI:10.1002/pon.3124 · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cancer patients and their oncologists often report differing perceptions of consultation discussions and discordant expectations regarding treatment outcomes. CONNECT, a computer-based communication aid, was developed to improve communication between patients and oncologists. METHODS: CONNECT includes assessment of patient values, goals, and communication preferences; patient communication skills training; and a preconsultation physician summary report. CONNECT was tested in a 3-arm, prospective, randomized clinical trial. Prior to the initial medical oncology consultation, adult patients with advanced cancer were randomized to the following arms: 1) control; 2) CONNECT with physician summary; or 3) CONNECT without physician summary. Outcomes were assessed with postconsultation surveys. RESULTS: Of 743 patients randomized, 629 completed postconsultation surveys. Patients in the intervention arms (versus control) felt that the CONNECT program made treatment decisions easier to reach (P = .003) and helped them to be more satisfied with these decisions (P < .001). In addition, patients in the intervention arms reported higher levels of satisfaction with physician communication format (P = .026) and discussion regarding support services (P = .029) and quality of life concerns (P = .042). The physician summary did not impact outcomes. Patients with higher levels of education and poorer physical functioning experienced greater benefit from CONNECT. CONCLUSIONS: This prospective randomized clinical trial demonstrates that computer-based communication skills training can positively affect patient satisfaction with communication and decision-making. Measurable patient characteristics may be used to identify subgroups most likely to benefit from an intervention such as CONNECT. Cancer 2013. © 2013 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 04/2013; 119(7). DOI:10.1002/cncr.27874 · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cancer clinical trials (CCTs) are important tools in the development of improved cancer therapies; yet, participation is low. Key psychosocial barriers exist that appear to impact a patient's decision to participate. Little is known about the relationship among knowledge, self-efficacy, preparation, decisional conflict, and patient decisions to take part in CCTs. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine if preparation for consideration of a CCT as a treatment option mediates the relationship between knowledge, self-efficacy, and decisional conflict. We also explored whether lower levels of decisional conflict are associated with greater likelihood of CCT enrollment. METHOD: In a pre-post test intervention study, cancer patients (N = 105) were recruited before their initial consultation with a medical oncologist. A brief educational intervention was provided for all patients. Patient self-report survey responses assessed knowledge, self-efficacy, preparation for clinical trial participation, decisional conflict, and clinical trial participation. RESULTS: Preparation was found to mediate the relationship between self-efficacy and decisional conflict (p = 0.003 for a test of the indirect mediational pathway for the decisional conflict total score). Preparation had a more limited role in mediating the effect of knowledge on decisional conflict. Further, preliminary evidence indicated that reduced decisional conflict was associated with increased clinical trial enrollment (p = 0.049). CONCLUSIONS: When patients feel greater CCT self-efficacy and have more knowledge, they feel more prepared to make a CCT decision. Reduced decisional conflict, in turn, is associated with the decision to enroll in a clinical trial. Our results suggest that preparation for decision-making should be a target of future interventions to improve participation in CCTs. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Psycho-Oncology 03/2013; 22(3). DOI:10.1002/pon.3043 · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The NCI developed the print-based educational brochure, Facing Forward, to fill a gap in helping cancer patients meet the challenges of transitioning from active treatment to survivorship; however, little research has been conducted on its efficacy. PURPOSE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of Facing Forward in promoting the uptake of recommended behaviors (e.g., ways to manage physical changes) and to explore its usability. METHODS: At the last treatment appointment, early-stage breast, prostate, colorectal, and thoracic cancer patients (N = 340) recruited from community clinical oncology practices and an academic medical center completed a baseline assessment and were randomized to receive either Facing Forward (n = 175) or an attention control booklet about the NCI's Cancer Information Service (n = 165). Patients completed follow-up assessments at 8 weeks and 6 months post-baseline. RESULTS: The reported uptake of recommended stress management behaviors was greater among intervention than control participants at both 8 weeks post-baseline (p = 0.016) and 6 months post-baseline (p = 0.017). At 8 weeks post-baseline, the intervention control group difference was greater among African-American than Caucasian participants (p < 0.03) and significant only among the former (p < 0.003); attendance at a cancer support group was also greater among the intervention than control group participants (p < 0.02). There were no significant intervention control group differences in the reported uptake of recommended behaviors in three other categories (p > 0.025). Intervention participants rated Facing Forward as understandable and helpful and indicated a high level of intention to try the behaviors recommended. CONCLUSIONS: Facing Forward can enhance early-stage survivors' reported ability to manage stress and increase support group use during the reentry period. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: Facing Forward can help survivors meet the challenges of the reentry period.
    Journal of Cancer Survivorship 12/2012; 7(1). DOI:10.1007/s11764-012-0245-7 · 3.29 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

263 Citations
115.26 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Treatment Research Institute, Philadelphia PA
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2011–2014
    • Cancer Support Community
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
    • Community College of Philadelphia
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
    • JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc.
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1998–2013
    • Fox Chase Cancer Center
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States