Pramila Rani Anne

Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

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Publications (53)128.24 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To report secondary efficacy endpoints of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0247, primary endpoint analysis of which demonstrated that preoperative radiation therapy (RT) with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin achieved a pathologic complete remission prespecified threshold (21%) to merit further study, whereas RT with capecitabine plus irinotecan did not (10%). A randomized, phase 2 trial evaluated preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with 2 concurrent chemotherapy regimens: (1) capecitabine (1200 mg/m(2)/d Monday-Friday) plus irinotecan (50 mg/m(2)/wk × 4); and (2) capecitabine (1650 mg/m(2)/d Monday-Friday) plus oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2)/wk × 5) for clinical T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after chemoradiation, then 4 to 6 weeks later, adjuvant chemotherapy (oxaliplatin 85 mg/m(2); leucovorin 400 mg/m(2); 5-fluorouracil 400 mg/m(2); 5-fluorouracil 2400 mg/m(2)) every 2 weeks × 9. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method. Local-regional failure (LRF), distant failure (DF), and second primary failure (SP) were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. No statistical comparisons were made between arms because each was evaluated individually. A total of 104 patients (median age, 57 years) were treated; characteristics were similar for both arms. Median follow-up for RT with capecitabine/irinotecan arm was 3.77 years and for RT with capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm was 3.97 years. Four-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP estimates for capecitabine/irinotecan arm were 68%, 85%, 16%, 24%, and 2%, respectively. The 4-year DFS, OS, LRF, DF, and SP failure estimates for capecitabine/oxaliplatin arm were 62%, 75%, 18%, 30%, and 6%, respectively. Efficacy results for both arms are similar to other reported studies but suggest that pathologic complete remission is an unsuitable surrogate for traditional survival metrics of clinical outcome. Although it remains uncertain whether the addition of a second cytotoxic agent enhances the effectiveness of fluorouracil plus RT, these results suggest that further study of irinotecan may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 11/2014; · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To report outcomes following adjuvant high-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) with or without chemotherapy for high-intermediate risk (HIR) and high-risk, early stage endometrial cancer as defined in Gynecologic Oncology Group trial 0249.
    Journal of Contemporary Brachytherapy 10/2014; 6(3):262-70.
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    ABSTRACT: To report outcomes after yttrium-90 microsphere brachytherapy for unresectable liver metastases from uveal melanoma and to evaluate factors predictive for overall survival (OS) and hepatic progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 71 patients were consecutively treated with microsphere brachytherapy for unresectable liver metastases from uveal melanoma between 2007 and 2012. Clinical, radiographic, and positron emission tomography-derived, functional tumor parameters were evaluated by log-rank test in univariate analysis and backwards stepwise multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression. OS and hepatic PFS were estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. A total of 134 procedures were performed in 71 patients with a median age of 63 years (range, 23 to 91 y). Fifty-eight patients (82%) received microsphere brachytherapy as a salvage therapy. Median hepatic PFS and OS after microsphere brachytherapy were 5.9 months (range, 1.3 to 19.1 mo) and 12.3 months (range, 1.9 to 49.3 mo), respectively. Median OS times after diagnosis of liver metastases was 23.9 months (range, 6.2 to 69.0 mo). In univariate analysis, female sex, pretreatment metabolic tumor volume, and total glycolic activity (TGA) were significantly correlated with hepatic PFS and OS. In multivariate analysis, female sex and TGA retained significance as independent predictors of hepatic PFS and OS. A low pretreatment TGA (<225 g) was associated with a significantly longer median OS than was a TGA≥225 g (17.2 vs. 9.7 mo, P=0.01). Yttrium-90 microsphere brachytherapy provided favorable survival times in patients with unresectable liver metastases from uveal melanoma. Metabolic tumor volume and TGA are predictive functional tumor parameters, which may aid patient selection and risk stratification.
    American journal of clinical oncology 01/2014; · 2.21 Impact Factor
  • Postgraduate Obstetrics & Gynecology. 05/2013; 33(9):1.
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    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 03/2013; · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE:: We performed a population-based analysis to evaluate changes in patterns of radiation therapy (RT) usage after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and outcomes among women aged 70 years or older with stage I breast cancer. METHODS:: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database to identify 33,350 women aged 70 years or older diagnosed from 1990 to 2008 with stage I invasive ductal breast cancer treated with BCS. Patients were stratified by estrogen receptor (ER) status, and classified by RT modality: external beam RT, brachytherapy (BT), other, or none. Usage frequency for each modality was tabulated from 2000 to 2008 subset. Predictors of omission of RT and use of BT were determined by multiple logistic regression. Cox proportional hazard models were created to evaluate the effect of RT usage on breast cancer-specific mortality. RESULTS:: The use of external beam RT decreased during 2000 to 2008. Omission of RT after BCS increased in patients with ER-positive tumors, whereas use of BT increased for both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors. Predictors for the use of BT were later year of diagnosis, metropolitan residence, and highest income quartile. Omission of use of any RT was associated with increased risk of breast cancer-specific mortality among both ER-positive and ER-negative cancers, with greater effect in ER-negative women. CONCLUSIONS:: Among older women with stage I breast cancer treated with BCS, use of any RT has been omitted more frequently and BT utilized more often. Further studies are necessary to evaluate potential under-utilization of RT, particularly among women with ER-negative tumors.
    American journal of clinical oncology 12/2012; · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: This study presents the implementation and experimental results of a novel technique for 4D tumor tracking using a commercially available and commonly used treatment couch and evaluates the tumor tracking accuracy in clinical settings.Methods: Commercially available couch is capable of positioning the patient accurately; however, currently there is no provision for compensating physiological movement using the treatment couch in real-time. In this paper, a real-time couch tracking control technique is presented together with experimental results in tumor motion compensation in four dimensions (superior-inferior, lateral, anterior-posterior, and time). To implement real-time couch motion for tracking, a novel control system for the treatment couch was developed. The primary functional requirements for this novel technique were: (a) the treatment couch should maintain all previous∕normal features for patient setup and positioning, (b) the new control system should be used as a parallel system when tumor tracking would be deployed, and (c) tracking could be performed in a single direction and∕or concurrently in all three directions of the couch motion (longitudinal, lateral, and vertical). To the authors' best knowledge, the implementation of such technique to a regular treatment couch for tumor tracking has not been reported so far. To evaluate the performance of the tracking couch, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of the system such as system positioning resolution, repeatability, accuracy, and tracking performance. Performance of the tracking system was evaluated using dosimetric test as an endpoint. To investigate the accuracy of real-time tracking in the clinical setting, the existing clinical treatment couch was replaced with our experimental couch and the linear accelerator was used to deliver 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans with and without tracking. The results of radiation dose distribution from these two sets of experiments were compared and presented here.Results: The mechanical accuracies were 0.12, 0.14, and 0.18 mm in X, Y, and Z directions. The repeatability of the desired motion was within ±0.2 mm. The differences of central axis dose between the 3D-CRT stationary plan and two tracking plans with different motion trajectories were 0.21% and 1.19%. The absolute dose differences of both 3D tracking plans comparing to the stationary plan were 1.09% and 1.20%. Comparing the stationary IMRT plan with the tracking IMRT plan, it was observed that the central axis dose difference was -0.87% and the absolute difference of both IMRT plans was 0.55%.Conclusions: The experimental results revealed that the treatment couch could be successfully used for real-time tumor tracking with a high level of accuracy. It was demonstrated that 4D tumor tracking was feasible using existing couch with implementation of appropriate tracking methodology and with modifications in the control system.
    Medical Physics 11/2012; 39(11):6957-67. · 2.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND:: The purpose of this study is to evaluate conditional survival probabilities for patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC). METHODS:: Patients with resected PC from 1998 to 2008 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Database. Data on patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were extracted. Overall survival (OS) rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A multivariable analysis at different time points from survival was performed to determine independent prognostic factors associated with all-cause mortality hazard ratios using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS:: A total of 4883 patients with resected PC were identified. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival estimates for patients at diagnosis were 67%, 29%, and 21%, respectively. The probability of surviving an additional 1-, 3-, or 5-year conditional upon already surviving 5 years after diagnosis were 89%, 76%, and 71%, respectively. Prognostic factors significantly correlated with improved OS at the time of diagnosis on multivariable analysis include: earlier stage, younger age, later year of diagnosis, white ethnicity, female sex, and residence in a high income district (P<0.05). Among those already surviving 3 years after diagnosis, younger age was the only prognostic factor statistically significantly correlated with improved OS (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS:: Conditional survival estimates provide additional prognostic information that may be used to counsel PC patients on how their prognosis may change over time. Further research using prospectively collected data is warranted to help determine recommended follow-up intervals and benchmarks for future clinical trials.
    American journal of clinical oncology 10/2012; · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students' knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. The students' prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61-66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80-83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1-9; 95% CI, 7.3-9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5-9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6-9.0). Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 07/2012; 83(4):e465-9. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Detailed information about how patients with head and neck carcinoma (HNC) are treated across practice settings does not exist. The authors conducted a prospective, observational study to examine the patterns of care for a series of patients with newly diagnosed HNC in the United States and to test 2 hypotheses: 1) There is no difference in the pattern of care between community and academic settings; and 2) the results of major randomized clinical trials will change the pattern of care in both practice settings within 1 year of publication in peer-reviewed journals. METHODS: Patients aged ≥18 years were enrolled in the Longitudinal Oncology Registry of Head and Neck Carcinoma (LORHAN) after providing written informed consent if they had a confirmed diagnosis of new HNC and were scheduled to receive treatment other than surgery alone. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2010, 100 centers enrolled 4243 patients, including 2612 patients (62%) from academic investigators and 1631 patients (38%) from community centers. Initial treatments were radiation with concurrent chemotherapy (30%) or cetuximab (9%), adjuvant radiotherapy (21%), induction chemotherapy (16%), and other (24%). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was the dominant radiation technique (84%). Single-agent cisplatin was prescribed in nearly half of patients and more often in academic centers (53% vs 43% of patients; P < .0001). Single-agent cetuximab was the next most common drug used (19%) and was prescribed more frequently in community settings (24% vs 17%; P = .0001). The data rejected the 2 prospective hypotheses. CONCLUSIONS: LORHAN documented differences in patient characteristics and treatments between community and academic settings for a large series of patients in the United States. Cancer 2012. © 2012 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 05/2012; · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Advanced head-and-neck cancer (HNC) remains a difficult disease to cure. Proteasome inhibitors such as bortezomib have the potential to improve survival over chemoradiotherapy alone. This Phase I dose-escalation study examined the potential of bortezomib in combination with cisplatin chemotherapy and concurrent radiation in the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent HNC. Eligible patients received cisplatin once weekly at 30 mg/m(2) per week and bortezomib along with concurrent radiation. Bortezomib was given on Days 1, 4, 8, and 11 every 3 weeks, with an initial starting dose of 0.7 mg/m(2) and escalation levels of 1.0 and 1.3 mg/m(2). Dose escalation was performed only after assessment to rule out any dose-limiting toxicity. We enrolled 27 patients with HNC, including 17 patients with recurrent disease who had received prior irradiation. Patients received bortezomib dose levels of 0.7 mg/m(2) (7 patients), 1.0 mg/m(2) (10 patients), and 1.3 mg/m(2) (10 patients). No Grade 5 toxicities, 3 Grade 4 toxicities (all hematologic and considered dose-limiting toxicities), and 39 Grade 3 toxicities (in 20 patients) were observed. With a median follow-up of 7.4 months, the overall median survival was 24.7 months (48.4 months for advanced HNC patients and 15.4 months for recurrent HNC patients). Bortezomib in combination with radiation therapy and cisplatin chemotherapy is safe in the treatment of HNC with a bortezomib maximum tolerated dose of 1.0 mg/m(2) in patients previously treated for HNC and 1.3 mg/m(2) in radiation-naive patients.
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 01/2012; 83(4):1192-7. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Approximately one-third of all breast cancer patients experience local recurrence of their tumor after initial treatment. As initial treatment often employs the use of radiation therapy (RT), the standard of care for local breast cancer recurrence after initial breast conserving therapy has traditionally been surgical intervention with mastectomy. However, recent attempts to preserve the intact breast after recurrence with local excision have revealed a potential need for RT in addition to repeat breast conserving surgery as rates of local failure with resection alone remain high. Additionally, local recurrence following initial mastectomy and chest wall RT can be treated with reirradiation to increase local control. Repeating RT, however, in a previously irradiated area, is a complex treatment strategy, as the clinician must carefully balance maximizing treatment effectiveness while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As a result, physicians have been hesitant to treat recurrent disease with repeat RT with limited data. Results from the current literature are promising and current clinical trials are underway to explore reirradiation modalities which will provide additional information on treatment-related toxicity and outcomes. This paper will review the current literature on repeat radiation therapy for locally recurrent breast cancer.
    International journal of breast cancer. 01/2012; 2012:571946.
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    ABSTRACT: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) multi-institutional Phase II study 98-12, evaluating paclitaxel and concurrent radiation (RT) for locally advanced pancreatic cancer, demonstrated a median survival of 11.3 months and a 1-year survival of 43%. The purpose of the randomized Phase II study by RTOG 0020 was to evaluate the addition of weekly low- dose gemcitabine with concurrent paclitaxel/RT and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the farnesyl transferase inhibitor R115777 following chemoradiation. Patients with unresectable, nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were eligible. Patients in Arm 1 received gemcitabine, 75 mg/m(2)/week, and paclitaxel, 40 mg/m(2)/week, for 6 weeks, with 50.4 Gy radiation (CXRT). Patients in Arm 2 received an identical chemoradiation regimen but then received maintenance R115777, 300 mg twice a day for 21 days every 28 days (CXRT+R115777), until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. One hundred ninety-five patients were entered into this study, and 184 were analyzable. Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicities occurred in less than 5% of CXRT patients. The most common grade 3/4 toxicity from R115777 was myelosuppression; however, grade 3/4 hepatic, metabolic, musculoskeletal, and neurologic toxicities were also reported. The median survival time was 11.5 months and 8.9 months for the CXRT and CXRT+R115777 arms, respectively. The CXRT arm achieved a median survival of almost 1-year, supporting chemoradiation as an important therapeutic modality for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Maintenance R115777 is not effective and is associated with a broad range of toxicities. These findings provide clinical evidence that inhibition of farnesylation affects many metabolic pathways, underscoring the challenge of developing an effective K-ras inhibitor.
    OncoTargets and Therapy 01/2012; 5:161-70. · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE The cost of care in radiation oncology has increased in the contemporary era. We investigated trends in the utilization of and payments for radiation oncology services. METHOD AND MATERIALS We used the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Physician/Supplier Procedure Summary Master File (PSPSMF) from 2000 to 2009. The PSPSMF is an aggregate of all Medicare Part B claims. We classified billing codes into five distinct radiation modalities: brachytherapy (BT), proton therapy (PT), stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), which we further divided into conventional (CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Volume, rate/100,000 beneficiaries, and total payments were calculated for each modality. Because the datasets do not contain individual case data, and the modalities differ in the number of billed procedures per case, we focused on change within each modality over time. RESULTS In the ten year interval between 1/1/2000 and 12/31/2009, the utilization rate of radiation increased in each modality: BT (19%), PT (13%), and total EBRT (5.9%). Within EBRT, the utilization rate of CRT has decreased 33% since 2000, while IMRT has increased rapidly since its introduction in 2002, accounting for 46% of total EBRT in 2009. Utilization of brachytherapy peaked in 2002. Overall payments for EBRT have increased 322% from $256 million in 2000 to $1,083 million in 2009. Since 2002, payments for IMRT have increased to $782 million. However, the rate of increase in payments for overall EBRT has slowed in 2007 - 2009, and in particular, IMRT payments increased only 4.4% in 2008 and decreased 1.6% in 2009. PT and SBRT payments have also increased during this time, but remain a small percentage of overall charges (2% and 1% of EBRT charges in 2009, respectively). CONCLUSION Among Medicare beneficiaries treated in the contemporary era, overall radiation oncology services have increased moderately while overall payments have dramatically increased, with the bulk of the increase due to IMRT payments. However, the rate of increase in payments has slowed in the last two years as reimbursement for IMRT has been reduced. CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION N/A
    Radiological Society of North America 2011 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting; 11/2011
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the rate of pathologic complete response (pCR) and the toxicity of two neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (chemoRT) regimens for Stage T3-T4 rectal cancer in a randomized Phase II study. Patients with Stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer of <12 cm from the anal verge were randomized to preoperative RT (50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (1,200 mg/m(2)/d Mondays through Friday) and irinotecan (50 mg/m(2) weekly in four doses) (Arm 1) or concurrent capecitabine (1,650 mg/m(2)/d Monday through Friday) and oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) weekly in five doses) (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks after chemoRT, and adjuvant chemotherapy 4-6 weeks after surgery. The primary endpoint was the pCR rate, requiring 48 evaluable patients per arm. A total of 146 patients were enrolled. The protocol chemotherapy was modified because of excessive gastrointestinal toxicity after treatment of 35 patients; 96 were assessed for the primary endpoint-the final regimen described above. The patient characteristics were similar for both arms. After chemoRT, the rate of tumor downstaging was 52% and 60% and the rate of nodal downstaging (excluding N0 patients) was 46% and 40%, for Arms 1 and 2, respectively. The pCR rate for Arm 1 was 10% and for Arm 2 was 21%. For Arm 1 and 2, the preoperative chemoRT rate of Grade 3-4 hematologic toxicity was 9% and 4% and the rate of Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity was 26% and 27%, respectively. Preoperative chemoRT with capecitabine plus oxaliplatin for distal rectal cancer has significant clinical activity (10 of 48 pCRs) and acceptable toxicity. This regimen is currently being evaluated in a Phase III randomized trial (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R04).
    International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics 07/2011; 82(4):1367-75. · 4.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To report the incidence of liver function test (LFT) toxicities after radioembolization with yttrium-90 ((90)Y) SIR-Spheres and review potential risk factors. Patients receiving (90)Y for radioembolization of primary or metastatic liver tumors had follow-up LFTs 29-571 days after treatment. The incidence and duration of bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) toxicities were documented using common terminology criteria. Factors that were assessed included previous intra-arterial (IA) therapy, systemic chemotherapy, low tumor-to-normal liver tissue ratio at mapping angiography, vascular stasis, and higher prescribed (90)Y doses. There were 81 patients who underwent 122 infusions and had follow-up LFTs. Of 122 infusions, 71 (58%) were associated with toxicity. One patient died with radiation-induced liver disease. Grade 3 or greater toxicities occurred in seven (7%) patients after nine procedures. The median durations of laboratory elevations for bilirubin, AST, and ALT were 29 days, 29 days, and 20 days. Toxicity developed after 51 (71%) of 72 infusions with previous IA therapy versus 20 (40%) of 50 infusions in treatment-naïve areas (P = .0006). Absence of previous systemic therapy was associated with greater risk of toxicity versus previous chemotherapy (47% vs 66%, P = .03). Other factors were not associated with increased toxicity. Mild hepatotoxicity developed frequently after infusion of SIR-Spheres using the body surface area method, with normalization of LFTs in most patients. Grade 3 or greater toxicities were seen in < 10% of infusions. Toxicity was strongly associated with previous IA therapy.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 07/2011; 22(10):1373-9. · 1.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the rate of recanalization and collateral vessel formation after side-branch embolization during mapping angiography for planned (90)Y radioembolization. Patients who underwent side-branch embolization at mapping angiography before (90)Y administration were included. Embolized vessels included the gastroduodenal artery, right gastric artery, and accessory arteries. Four interventional radiologists reviewed follow-up angiograms to assess recanalization and new collateral formation of embolized vessels. The time to recanalization or new collateral formation was tracked within 60 days and after the final arteriographic study. Differences in outcome among patients who had and those who had not undergone previous arterial directed therapy were reviewed. Fifty-six patients underwent side-branch embolization and follow-up arteriography; 124 treatments were performed after side-branch embolization (median, 2; range, 1-7), and the median follow-up period was 134 days (range, 7-684 days). Recanalization or new collateral vessel formation was found in 6 of 56 patients (10.7%) and in 8 of 56 patients (14.3%) 60 days after treatment or at final angiography, respectively. Embolization of 110 arteries was accomplished (42 gastroduodenal arteries, 46 right gastric arteries, and 22 accessory arteries). Two of 110 arteries (1.8%) recanalized, and four of 110 (3.6%) had new collateral vessels within 60 days. At final evaluation, 2 of 110 arteries (1.8%) had recanalized and 7 of 110 (6.4%) had new collaterals. Previous liver-directed therapy did not affect outcome (p > 0.05). No patient had symptomatic gastrointestinal ulceration. In more than 89% of patients, side-branch embolization provides durable occlusion for (90)Y radioembolization without collateral development or recanalization for a bilobar cycle of therapy. Further recanalization and collateral development at longer-term follow-up are minimal.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 07/2011; 197(1):W169-74. · 2.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The prognosis after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for ampullary carcinoma (AC) is superior to that of pancreatic cancer. Decisions regarding adjuvant therapy are influenced by factors such as nodal status, stage, and grade, but the influence of these individual variables on survival is unclear. A prospective tumor registry database was queried to identify patients who underwent PD for AC at Thomas Jefferson University between Jan 1997 and Apr 2009. The study was conducted with the approval of the institutional review board. Data were collected through review of hospital and departmental charts. Overall survival (OS) was analyzed using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. The proportional hazard assumption was verified for the overall model and individual covariates. A total of 61 patients underwent PD for AC at our institution. There were five perioperative deaths (8.2%). Mean age was 70 years (62% male). Median survival time (MST) was 50 months for all patients. Only primary tumor stage, T1/T2 versus T3/T4 (American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging, version 6), was associated with OS in univariate analyses (p = 0.003). The association of nodal status with OS was borderline-significant (p = 0.08), with the MST being 84 months for node-negative and 17 months for node-positive patients. The remaining covariates were not predictors of OS. In the multivariate analysis, only primary tumor stage (HR, 5.1; p < 0.001) and age (HR, 1.04; p = 0.06), but not nodal status or adjuvant therapy, were associated with overall survival. Advanced primary tumor stage and age were associated with inferior OS after PD for AC. Adjuvant therapy did not impact survival. Patients with advanced tumor stage should be considered for clinical trials of adjuvant therapy after PD with novel compounds and optimized radiation therapy strategies.
    Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery 04/2011; 15(8):1411-6. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of radioembolization in the management of hepatic metastasis of uveal melanoma after failure of immunoembolization or chemoembolization. From January 2007 through April 2009, 32 patients underwent radioembolization therapy for hepatic metastasis of uveal melanoma. Pretreatment tumor burdens were divided into three categories: less than 25% (n = 25), 25-50% (n = 5), and greater than 50% (n = 2). Toxicity, extrahepatic disease, and hepatic tumor response were assessed 1 month and then every 3 months after treatment. Best radiographic response of hepatic metastasis was determined with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria. Overall survival and progression-free survival of hepatic metastasis were estimated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Differences in survival between subgroups were evaluated by log-rank test in univariate analysis. The clinical follow-up period ranged from 1.0 to 29.0 months (median, 10.0 months). The median overall survival was 10.0 months, and the progression-free survival of hepatic metastasis, 4.7 months. Twenty-two patients died 1.0-29.0 months (median, 5.8 months) after treatment owing to progression of liver disease (n = 13), extrahepatic disease (n = 4), or both (n = 5). Patients who had a pretreatment tumor burden less than 25% had longer median overall survival (10.5 vs 3.9 months, p = 0.0003) and progression-free survival (6.4 vs 3.0 months, p = 0.03) than patients who had a pretreatment tumor burden of 25% or greater. Patients who had a complete response (n = 1), partial response (n = 1), or stable disease (n = 18) had longer median overall survival (14.7 vs 4.9 months, p = 0.0006) and progression-free survival of hepatic metastasis (7.9 vs 3.1 months, p < 0.0001) than patients with tumor progression (n = 12). Self-limiting grade 1-2 systemic toxicity included tiredness (n = 9), indigestion (n = 2), and abdominal discomfort (n = 5). Grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity was attributed to tumor progression. Radioembolization is safe and effective salvage therapy for limited metastasis of uveal melanoma.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 02/2011; 196(2):468-73. · 2.90 Impact Factor
  • Fuel and Energy Abstracts 01/2011; 81(2).

Publication Stats

525 Citations
128.24 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2014
    • Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals
      • Department of Radiation Oncology
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2012
    • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
      • Division of Radiation Oncology
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 1999–2011
    • Thomas Jefferson University
      • Department of Radiation Oncology
      Philadelphia, PA, United States
  • 2003
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • School of Medicine
      Pittsburgh, PA, United States