Bronwen J Paine

University of Adelaide, Tarndarnya, South Australia, Australia

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Publications (6)9.65 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Dementia is increasing in prevalence as the population ages. An earlier rather than later diagnosis allows persons with dementia and their families to plan ahead and access appropriate management. However, most diagnoses are made by general practitioners (GPs) later in the course of the disease and are associated with management that is poorly adherent to recommended guidelines. This trial examines the effectiveness of a peer led dementia educational intervention for GPs. The study is a cluster randomised trial, conducted across three states and five sites. All GPs will complete an audit of their consenting patients aged 75 years or more at three time points - baseline, 12 and 24 months. GPs allocated to the intervention group will receive two educational sessions from a peer GP or nurse, and will administer the GPCOG to consenting patients at baseline and 12 months. The first education session will provide information about dementia and the second will provide individualised feedback on audit results. GPs in the waitlist group will receive the RACGP Guidelines by post following the 12 month auditOutcomes: Primary outcomes are carer and consumer quality of life and depression. Secondary outcomes include: rates of GP identification of dementia compared to a more detailed gold standard assessment conducted in the patient's home; GP identification of differential diagnoses including reversible causes of cognitive impairment; and GP referral to specialists, Alzheimers' Australia and support services. A "case finding" and a "screening" group will be compared and the psychometrics of the GPCOG will be examined.Sample size: Approximately 2,000 subjects aged 75 years and over will be recruited through approximately 160 GPs, to yield approximately 200 subjects with dementia (reducing to 168 by 24 months). The trial outlined in this paper has been peer reviewed and supported by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council. At the time of submission of this paper 2,034 subjects have been recruited and the intervention delivered to 114 GPs. Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12607000117415.
    BMC Family Practice 03/2012; 13:12. · 1.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recruiting patients to large randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the primary care setting can be challenging. Research teams need to identify and utilise strategies that both maximise the efficiency of recruitment and minimise the burden on general practitioners. To describe our methods for identifying, approaching and recruiting female patients aged 50-69 years to a long-term double-blind RCT of hormone therapy (HT) - the Women's International Study of long Duration Oestrogen after Menopause (WISDOM). The effectiveness of conducting group seminars with patients prior to one-to-one screening is discussed. Female patients aged between 50 and 69 years were sent letters from participating general practitioners in Adelaide inviting them to participate in WISDOM and attend an initial seminar providing information about HT and the trial prior to a screening interview with a trial nurse. Recruitment rates for those who did or did not attend group seminars were compared. Women who attended a group seminar conducted by the research team were twice as likely to attend an initial screening visit and enroll to participate in WISDOM than women who did not attend a seminar (p < 0.001). In addition, it was estimated that the time required to randomise a woman in the trial, and the number and duration of telephone calls to screen out uninterested women, was reduced for the seminar group. Conducting group seminars with potential participants may be a useful strategy for maximising recruitment from general practice, by increasing patient information and reducing a research team's workload. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN63718836.
    Trials 02/2008; 9:5. · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this pilot study was to assess any trends related to the timing of initiation, and duration, of hormone therapy (HT) use on cognitive function to facilitate the design and power calculations for a future large cohort study entitled Research into Memory, Brain function and Estrogen Replacement (REMEMBER). A total of 428 women aged older than 60 years were recruited from a computer-generated random selection of Adelaide households. Demographic and lifestyle characteristics, and HT use history were recorded and confirmed. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression score was used to assess mood. Cognitive tests were administered measuring global cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination), attention and concentration (Trail Making Test Parts A and B), verbal learning and memory (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease [CERAD] word list immediate and delayed recall), and verbal expression (letter fluency [FAS], category fluency [Animals], and the Boston Naming Test [short form]). Analyses were adjusted for age, education, mood, body mass index, smoking, alcohol intake, and history of cerebrovascular disease. HT use was defined as the use of systemic HT for at least 1 year. Early initiation of HT use was defined as commencement of HT before age 56 years for women with a uterus and ovaries, or within 5 years of a hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy. Late initiation of HT use was defined as HT commencing after these times. Early initiators of HT performed better than late initiators on the Mini-Mental State Examination (P = 0.04) and were faster than never users on the Trail Making Test Part A (P = 0.02). Women aged 70-79 years who initiated HT early performed better on the FAS test than never users (P = 0.0008). Late initiators performed worse than never users on the Mini-Mental State Examination (P = 0.09), and on the FAS test in the 60-69 year (P = 0.06) and 80 years and older (P = 0.095) age groups. However, late initiators performed better than never users on the FAS test in the 70-79 year age group (P = 0.015). HT users of less than 11 years (P = 0.09), HT users of more than 11 years (P = 0.04), and estrogen-only users (P = 0.024) performed faster than never users on the Trail Making Test Part A. Combined estrogen plus progestin users performed better than never users on the Boston Naming Test short form (P = 0.07). For some cognitive domains, early initiation of HT from around menopause may be beneficial, and initiation of HT in late menopause may be detrimental. The timing of the initiation of HT seems critical. To fully test these hypotheses and to further examine these trends by route and type of HT regimen in this population, a study size of 2,500 women would be required.
    Menopause 01/2006; 13(1):28-36. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the impact of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) on the use and perception of hormone therapy (HT) in well-informed and altruistic women who had volunteered for a similar long-term study of HT (Women's International Study of long Duration Oestrogen after Menopause, WISDOM). A total of 840 South Australian WISDOM participants were sent questionnaires asking about their source of information about the WHI, interpretation of the 2002 WHI findings, perception of HT as a risk factor for breast cancer, attitudes towards doctors and the media and intent to use HT in the future. Altogether, 618 participants (74%) responded. Written and verbal information provided by WISDOM were rated as the most helpful sources of information about the WHI. Participants were aware of the increase in breast cancer and decrease in fractures seen with combined estrogen/progestogen hormone therapy (EPT) but were less convinced about the other major findings, including cardiovascular disease and dementia. HT was rated as an important risk factor for breast cancer. Participants valued medical research and were more likely to question therapies without evidence. After WHI and WISDOM, most were willing to participate in a subsequent trial and most past HT users resumed therapy. There are sufficient recruits for future long-term HT studies if they are given sufficient quality information and individual counselling. Our study also suggests that women who are appropriately informed may choose to take long-term HT despite a more conservative approach advised by some agencies.
    Climacteric 07/2004; 7(2):143-52. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the likelihood of 50-69 year old women participating in the Women's International Study of long Duration Oestrogen after Menopause (WISDOM)--a 10 year randomised placebo controlled trial of hormone replacement therapy involving 10 years treatment plus a further 10 years follow up of major health outcomes. The Health Monitor 2 (a representative population telephone survey) was used. Participants were 268 women aged 50-69 years from a total survey population of 2003 adults. Sociodemographic characteristics were collected. Of the women surveyed 20.9% indicated they were likely to participate and this was independent of sociodemographic characteristics and self reported health status. Women aged 50-54 were more likely to participate than older women. After allowing for exclusion criteria, it is estimated that approximately 10% of 50-69 year old women approached for recruitment in WISDOM may actually participate. There are likely to be sufficient altruistic women in this population to run WISDOM in Australia.
    Australian family physician 09/2000; 29(8):797-801. · 0.71 Impact Factor
  • Climacteric. 8 (supp 2):103.