Philip McLoone

University of Glasgow, Glasgow, SCT, United Kingdom

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Publications (13)41.96 Total impact

  • Z Wang, P McLoone, D S Morrison
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    ABSTRACT: Background:Cancer survivors may be particularly motivated to improve their health behaviours.Methods:We compared health behaviours and obesity in cancer survivors with the general population, using household survey and cancer registry data.Results:Cancer survivors were more likely than those with no history of cancer to eat fruit and vegetables (ORadj 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.66), less likely to engage in physical activity (ORadj 0.79, 95% CI 0.67-0.93) and more likely to have stopped smoking (ORadj 1.25, 95% CI 1.09-1.44).Conclusions:Most health-related behaviours were better in cancer survivors than the general population, but low physical activity levels may be amenable to health promotion interventions.British Journal of Cancer (2014), 1-4. doi:10.1038/bjc.2014.598 www.bjcancer.com.
    British journal of cancer. 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Dear Editor,We thank Vincent et al. [1] for their interest in our work. They suggest that three additional papers should be considered in our systematic review of survival in solid cancer patients following intensive care admission [2]. Two of the papers suggested indeed meet the inclusion criteria. The paper by Kim et al. [3] was published in print the same week as our literature search was performed, and as a consequence did not appear in our search results. The paper by Hwang et al. [4] was not identified by our search strategy. Both papers report survival outcomes for patients with lung cancer who were admitted to the ICU, the first in a cohort of 97 patients with stage IIIB/IV lung cancer and the second in a cohort of 95 patients with lung cancer (of whom 75 % had stage IIIB/IV disease). ICU mortality was reported in 57 and 53.6 %, respectively. While these figures are higher than the 40.1 % average pooled mortality for ICU patients with lung cancer reported in our systematic revi ...
    Intensive Care Medicine 11/2014; · 5.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: One in seven patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) has a cancer diagnosis but evidence on their expected outcomes after admission has not been synthesised.
    Intensive care medicine. 09/2014;
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    Aishah Coyte, David S Morrison, Philip McLoone
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    ABSTRACT: There is evidence that cancer survivors are at increased risk of second primary cancers. Changes in the prevalence of risk factors and diagnostic techniques may have affected more recent risks. We examined the incidence of second primary cancer among adults in the West of Scotland, UK, diagnosed with cancer between 2000 and 2004 (n = 57,393). We used National Cancer Institute Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results and International Agency for Research on Cancer definitions of multiple primary cancers and estimated indirectly standardised incidence ratios (SIR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). There was a high incidence of cancer during the first 60 days following diagnosis (SIR = 2.36, 95%CI = 2.12 to 2.63). When this period was excluded the risk was not raised, but it was high for some patient groups; in particular women aged <50 years with breast cancer (SIR = 2.13, 95%CI = 1.58 to 2.78), patients with bladder (SIR = 1.41, 95%CI = 1.19 to 1.67) and head & neck (SIR = 1.93, 95%CI = 1.67 to 2.21) cancer. Head & neck cancer patients had increased risks of lung cancer (SIR = 3.75, 95%CI = 3.01 to 4.62), oesophageal (SIR = 4.62, 95%CI = 2.73 to 7.29) and other head & neck tumours (SIR = 6.10, 95%CI = 4.17 to 8.61). Patients with bladder cancer had raised risks of lung (SIR = 2.18, 95%CI = 1.62 to 2.88) and prostate (SIR = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.72 to 3.30) cancer. Relative risks of second primary cancers may be smaller than previously reported. Premenopausal women with breast cancer and patients with malignant melanomas, bladder and head & neck cancers may benefit from increased surveillance and advice to avoid known risk factors.
    BMC Cancer 04/2014; 14(1):272. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Community pharmacies may offer an accessible way of delivering weight-management programmes but there have been few trials that use clinically significant weight loss outcomes, objective measures of weight and follow-up to 12 months. We aimed to evaluate weight change among patients who used the Counterweight weight management programme delivered by community pharmacies. METHODS: The Counterweight programme was introduced into community pharmacies in Fife, Scotland in 2009 for patients with a BMI >= 30 or a BMI >= 28 with a co-morbidity in localities in which Counterweight was not available at GP practices. The aim was to achieve an energy deficit of 500-600 kcal per day. Counterweight specialist dietitians delivered training, support and patient information materials to community pharmacies. Patient weight was measured by pharmacy staff at each weight management session. Weight data recorded at each weight management session were used to estimate weight change and attendance at 3, 6 and 12 months. RESULTS: Between March 2009 and July 2012, 458 patients were enrolled by the community pharmacies. Three-quarters of patients were women, mean age was 54 (SD 7.4) years and mean BMI 36.1 (SD 5.9) kg/m2. Of 314 patients enrolled for at least 12 months, 32 (10.2% on an intention to treat basis) had achieved the target weight loss of >=5%; this was 41.6% of those who attended at 12 months representing a mean weight loss of 4.1 kg. Using Last Observation Carried Forward, 15.9% achieved the target weight loss within 12 months of enrolling. There was no significant effect of sex, baseline BMI or age on weight loss. CONCLUSIONS: The Counterweight pharmacy programme has a similar effectiveness to other primary care based weight management programmes and should be considered as part of a range of services available to a community to manage overweight and obesity.
    BMC Public Health 03/2013; 13(1):282. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is no established primary care solution for the rapidly increasing numbers of severely obese people with body mass index (BMI) > 40 kg/m(2). This programme aimed to generate weight losses of ≥15 kg at 12 months, within routine primary care. Feasibility study in primary care. Patients with a BMI ≥40 kg/m(2) commenced a micronutrient-replete 810-833 kcal/day low-energy liquid diet (LELD), delivered in primary care, for a planned 12 weeks or 20 kg weight loss (whichever was the sooner), with structured food reintroduction and then weight-loss maintenance, with optional orlistat to 12 months. Of 91 patients (74 females) entering the programme (baseline: weight 131 kg, BMI 48 kg/m(2), age 46 years), 58/91(64%) completed the LELD stage, with a mean duration of 14.4 weeks (standard deviation [SD] = 6.0 weeks), and a mean weight loss of 16.9 kg (SD = 6.0 kg). Four patients commenced weight-loss maintenance omitting the food-reintroduction stage. Of the remaining 54, 37(68%) started and completed food reintroduction over a mean duration of 9.3 weeks (SD = 5.7 weeks), with a further mean weight loss of 2.1 kg (SD = 3.7 kg), before starting a long-term low-fat-diet weight-loss maintenance plan. A total of 44/91 (48%) received orlistat at some stage. At 12 months, weight was recorded for 68/91 (75%) patients, with a mean loss of 12.4 kg (SD = 11.4 kg). Of these, 30 (33% of all 91 patients starting the programme) had a documented maintained weight loss of ≥15 kg at 12 months, six (7%) had a 10-15 kg loss, and 11 (12%) had a 5-10 kg loss. The indicative cost of providing this entire programme for wider implementation would be £861 per patient entered, or £2611 per documented 15 kg loss achieved. A care package within routine primary care for severe obesity, including LELD, food reintroduction, and weight-loss maintenance, was well accepted and achieved a 12-month-maintained weight loss of ≥15 kg for one-third of all patients entering the programme.
    British Journal of General Practice 02/2013; 63(607):115-24. · 2.03 Impact Factor
  • Philip McLoone, David S Morrison
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To estimate the potential to reduce childhood obesity through targeted interventions of overweight households. DESIGN: Cross-sectional nationally representative samples of the Scottish population. Setting: Households in Scotland during 2008 and 2009. Participants: A total of 1651 households with parents and children aged 2-15 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The WHO cut-off points for adult body mass index (BMI): overweight (25 to <30 kg/m(2)) and obese (≥30 kg/m(2)). Overweight and obesity in childhood respectively defined as a BMI 85th to <95th percentile and ≥95th percentile based on 1990 reference centiles. RESULTS: Thirty-two percent (600/1849) of children and 75% (966/1290) of adults were overweight or obese. Seventy-five percent (1606/2128) of all children lived with a parent who was overweight or obese. Among obese children, 58% (185/318) lived with an obese parent. The population attributable risk percentage of child obesity associated with parental obesity was 32.5%. Targeting obese households would require substantial falls in adult weight and need to reach 38% of all children; it might achieve a reduction in the prevalence of childhood obesity of 14% in these households (from 26% to 12%). Targeting parents with BMI ≥ 40 might reduce the overall prevalence of child obesity by 9%. Such an intervention would require large weight loss, consistent with approaches used for morbidly obese adults; it would involve 4% of all children and lead to a reduction in the prevalence of obesity in these households from 57% to 16%. CONCLUSIONS: Family-based interventions for obesity would be most efficiently targeted at obese children whose parents are morbidly obese.
    The European Journal of Public Health 12/2012; · 2.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective:To document changes in body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) over a 10-year period 1998-2008, in representative surveys of adults.Subjects:Adults aged 18-72 in the Scottish Health Surveys conducted in 1998, 2003 and 2008 were divided, separately for men and women, into eleven 5-year age bands. 'Synthetic birth-cohorts' were created by dividing participants into thirteen 5-years-of-birth bands (n=20 423). Weight, height and WC were objectively measured by trained observers.Results:Subjects with data available on BMI/WC were 7743/6894 in 1998, 5838/4437 in 2003 and 4688/925 in 2008 with approximately equal gender distributions. Mean BMI and waist were both greater in successive surveys in both men and women. At most specific ages, people were consistently heavier in 2008 than in 1998 by about 1-1.5 BMI units, and WCs were greater by about 2-6 cm in men and 5-7 cm in women. Greater increases were seen at younger ages between 1998 and 2003 than between 2003 and 2008, however increases continued at older ages, particularly in waist. All birth-cohorts observed over the 10 years 1998-2008 showed increases in both BMI and waist, most marked in the younger groups. The 10-year increases in waist within birth-cohorts (mean 7.4 cm (8.1%) in men and 8.6 cm (10.9%) in women) were more striking than in BMI (mean 1.8 kg m(-2) (6.6%) in men and 1.5 kg m(-2) (6.4%) in women) were particularly steep in older women.Conclusion:People were heavier and fatter in 2003 than those of the same age in 1998, with less marked increases in WC between 2003 and 2008 than between 1998 and 2003. There were proportionally greater increases in WC than in BMI, especially in older women. This suggests a disproportionate increase in body fat, compared with muscle, particularly among older women.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 4 September 2012; doi:10.1038/ijo.2012.122.
    International journal of obesity (2005) 09/2012; · 5.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tea may be a potentially modifiable and highly prevalent risk factor for the most common cancer in men, prostate cancer. However, associations between black tea consumption and prostate cancer in epidemiological studies have been inconsistent, limited to a small number of studies with small numbers of cases and short follow-up periods and without grade-specific information. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 6,016 men who were enrolled in the Collaborative Cohort Study between 1970 and 1973 and followed up to December 31, 2007. We used Cox proportional hazards models to investigate the association between tea consumption and overall as well as grade-specific risk of prostate cancer incidence. Three hundred and eighteen men developed prostate cancer in up to 37 years of follow-up. We found a positive association between consumption of tea and overall risk of prostate cancer incidence (P = 0.02). The association was greatest among men who drank ≥ 7 cups of tea per day (HR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.06 to 2.12), compared with the baseline of 0-3 cups/day. However, we did not find any significant association between tea intake and low- (Gleason <7) or high-grade (Gleason 8-10) prostate cancer incidence. Men with higher intake of tea are at greater risk of developing prostate cancer, but there is no association with more aggressive disease. Further research is needed to determine the underlying biological mechanisms for the association.
    Nutrition and Cancer 06/2012; 64(6):790-7. · 2.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Higher consumption of coffee intake has recently been linked with reduced risk of aggressive prostate cancer (PC) incidence, although meta-analysis of other studies that examine the association between coffee consumption and overall PC risk remains inconclusive. Only one recent study investigated the association between coffee intake and grade-specific incidence of PC, further evidence is required to understand the aetiology of aggressive PCs. Therefore, we conducted a prospective study to examine the relationship between coffee intake and overall as well as grade-specific PC risk. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 6017 men who were enrolled in the Collaborative cohort study in the UK between 1970 and 1973 and followed up to 31st December 2007. Cox Proportional Hazards Models were used to evaluate the association between coffee consumption and overall, as well as Gleason grade-specific, PC incidence. Higher coffee consumption was inversely associated with risk of high grade but not with overall risk of PC. Men consuming 3 or more cups of coffee per day experienced 55% lower risk of high Gleason grade disease compared with non-coffee drinkers in analysis adjusted for age and social class (HR 0.45, 95% CI 0.23-0.90, p value for trend 0.01). This association changed a little after additional adjustment for Body Mass Index, smoking, cholesterol level, systolic blood pressure, tea intake and alcohol consumption. Coffee consumption reduces the risk of aggressive PC but not the overall risk.
    Nutrition Journal 06/2012; 11:42. · 2.65 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High cholesterol may be a modifiable risk factor for prostate cancer but results have been inconsistent and subject to potential "reverse causality" where undetected disease modifies cholesterol prior to diagnosis. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 12,926 men who were enrolled in the Midspan studies between 1970 and 1976 and followed up to 31st December 2007. We used Cox-Proportional Hazards Models to evaluate the association between baseline plasma cholesterol and Gleason grade-specific prostate cancer incidence. We excluded cancers detected within at least 5 years of cholesterol assay. 650 men developed prostate cancer in up to 37 years' follow-up. Baseline plasma cholesterol was positively associated with hazard of high grade (Gleason score≥8) prostate cancer incidence (n = 119). The association was greatest among men in the 2nd highest quintile for cholesterol, 6.1 to < 6.69 mmol/l, Hazard Ratio 2.28, 95% CI 1.27 to 4.10, compared with the baseline of < 5.05 mmol/l. This association remained significant after adjustment for body mass index, smoking and socioeconomic status. Men with higher cholesterol are at greater risk of developing high-grade prostate cancer but not overall risk of prostate cancer. Interventions to minimise metabolic risk factors may have a role in reducing incidence of aggressive prostate cancer.
    BMC Cancer 01/2012; 12:25. · 3.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 2012 Apr;29 Suppl 1:i139-i144
    Family Practice 01/2012; 29(Suppl 1):i139. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    Raymond Oliphant, Philip McLoone, David Morrison
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To report the causes of, and ages at, death of subjects in an English colorectal cancer screening trial.Design and settingAnalysis of 78 708 deaths occurring between 1981 and 2008, within the Nottingham randomised controlled trial of biennial faecal occult blood testing.Main outcome measuresCause of death, age at death by sex and by cause.ResultsSignificantly more subjects died from verified colorectal cancer in the trial's control group than in the intervention group (3.2% vs 2.9%). For no other major cause of death was the difference in proportion across the two groups statistically significant. Age at death was lower for cancer than for other principal causes, except for ischaemic heart disease among women. However, mean age at death was higher for colorectal cancer than for other cancers, except for prostate cancer among men. Increasing levels of material deprivation significantly lowered the expected ages at death, independently of cause. For both men and women, the mean age at death from all causes for screening participants was higher than that of controls and non-participants. Mean deprivation was lowest among participants. Of those participating in screening, and dying from colorectal cancer, subjects receiving negative test results lived significantly longer than those who received positive test results. However, if dying from other causes, they died at an earlier age.Conclusions The age at death from colorectal cancer is higher than that of most other cancers. Those accepting a screening invitation live longer than non-participants. In part, this difference is explained by relative deprivation. Among screening participants, the receipt of a positive, as opposed to a negative, test result is associated with a later age at death.
    Gut 12/2010; 60(8):1163-4. · 10.73 Impact Factor