Konstantinos Moutoussis

Università Telematica "E-Campus", Campobasso, Molise, Italy

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Publications (19)92.03 Total impact

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    Konstantinos Moutoussis
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    ABSTRACT: When subjects are asked to perceptually bind rapidly alternating color and motion stimuli, the pairings they report are different from the ones actually occurring in physical reality. A possible explanation for this misbinding is that the time necessary for perception is different for different visual attributes. Such an explanation is in logical harmony with the fact that the visual brain is characterized by different, functionally specialized systems, with different processing times for each; this type of organization naturally leads to different perceptual times for the corresponding attributes. In the present review, the experimental findings supporting perceptual asynchrony are presented, together with the original theoretical explanation behind the phenomenon and its implication for visual consciousness. Alternative theoretical views and additional experimental facts concerning perceptual misbinding are also reviewed, with a particular emphasis given to the role of attention. With few exceptions, most theories converge on the idea that the observed misbinding reflects a difference in perception times, which is in turn due to differences in neuronal processing times for different attributes within the brain. These processing time differences have been attributed to several different factors, attention included, with the possibility of co-existence between them.
    Frontiers in Psychology 01/2012; 3:314.
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    Daphne Roumani, Konstantinos Moutoussis
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    ABSTRACT: When different stimuli are presented dichoptically, perception alternates between the two in a stochastic manner. After a long-lasting and rigorous debate, there is growing consensus that this phenomenon, known as binocular rivalry (BR), is the result of a dynamic competition occurring at multiple levels of the visual hierarchy. The role of low- and high-level adaptation mechanisms in controlling these perceptual alternations has been a key issue in the rivalry literature. Both types of adaptation are dispersed throughout the visual system and have an equally influential, or even causal, role in determining perception. Such an explanation of BR is also in accordance with the relationship between the latter and attention. However, an overall explanation of this intriguing perceptual phenomenon needs to also include noise as an equally fundamental process involved in the stochastic resonance of perceptual bistability.
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 01/2012; 6:35. · 2.91 Impact Factor
  • Vassilis Pelekanos, Konstantinos Moutoussis
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    ABSTRACT: Embodied cognition and perceptual symbol theories assume that higher cognition interacts with and is grounded in perception and action. Recent experiments have shown that language processing interacts with perceptual processing in various ways, indicating that linguistic representations have a strong perceptual character. In the present study, we have used signal detection theory to investigate whether the comprehension of written sentences, implying either horizontal or vertical orientation, could improve the participants' visual sensitivity for discriminating between horizontal or vertical square-wave gratings and noise. We tested this prediction by conducting one main and one follow-up experiment. Our results indicate that language can, indeed, affect perception at such a low level of the visual process and thus provide further support for the embodied theories of cognition.
    Perception 01/2011; 40(12):1402-12. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    Vassilis Pelekanos, Daphne Roumani, Konstantinos Moutoussis
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    ABSTRACT: Binocular rivalry (BR) is a phenomenon in which visual perception alternates between two different monocular stimuli. There has been a long debate regarding its nature, with a special emphasis on whether low- or high-level mechanisms are involved. Prior adaptation to one of the two monocular stimuli is known to affect initial dominance in the subsequent dichoptic presentation. In the present work, we have used three different types of adaptation in order to investigate how each one affects initial dominance during BR. In the first adaptation type, adapting to a stimulus identical to the one used during rivalry has led to its consequent suppression, verifying previous findings. The binocular presentation which we have used excludes the possibility of eye-adaptation, suggesting that it is the specific stimulus that the brain adapts to. In the second adaptation type, we find suppression effects following adaptation to stimuli belonging to the same category (face or house) but are different from the specific ones used in the following BR presentation. In the final adaptation type, in which the words "face" or "house" are used as adaptors, no statistically significant effect was found. These results suggest that perceptual selection can be directly influenced by the prior presentation of visual stimuli different to the ones used during BR, and thus support a higher-level, cognitive influence on the latter.
    Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 01/2011; 5:187. · 2.91 Impact Factor
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    Konstantinos Moutoussis
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    ABSTRACT: A major problem in visual neuroscience is to distinguish neuronal activity which is directly related to the conscious percept. The word "directly" is used here as opposed to an indirect relationship, as is for example the case with activity in the retina, which is produced by a stimulus in the outside world and will eventually lead to the perception of this stimulus. As for the word "related", it is used to mean activity which creates the perceptual experience or, even more extremely, activity that is the perceptual experience. The distinction between the two (is vs. creates) is not straightforward, although there might be some differences between them. Philosophers would argue that they have a different phenomenology, the percept existing only for the perceiving person, whereas the underlying neuronal activation exists for all to observe. One could go on to argue that it is actually not the neuronal activation that "everybody" observes, but each one observes his own percept of it, which is also unique and subjective. Still, the content of this percept and the one of the original stimulus are quite different. The purpose of the present review is not to dig deep into such philosophical issues, but rather to give an overview of neuroscientific approaches trying to locate the neural correlate of conscious perception.
    Communicative & integrative biology 06/2009; 2(3):265-7.
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    Stewart Shipp, Daniel L Adams, Konstantinos Moutoussis, Semir Zeki
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    ABSTRACT: The visual features of an object are processed by multiple, functionally specialized areas of cerebral cortex. When several objects are seen simultaneously, what mechanism preserves the association of features that belong to a single item? We address this question-known as the "binding problem"-by examining combinatorial feature selectivity of neurons in area V2. In recording from anesthetized macaques, we estimate that dual selectivity for chromatic and spatiotemporal attributes is 50% more common (27% vs. 18% sampling frequency) in superficial and deep layer neurons receiving feedback connections from higher areas, compared with layer 4-3 neurons relaying ascending signals. The operation of feedback pathways is thought to mediate attentional modulation of activity that may achieve binding through acting to select one single object for higher representation and filtering out competing objects. We propose that dual-selective neurons perform a "bridging" function, mediating the transfer of feedback-induced bias between feature dimensions. The bias can be propagated through V2 output neurons (of unitary selectivity) to higher levels of specialized processing and so promote selection of the target object's representation among multiple feature maps. The bridging function would thus act to unify the outcome of parallel, object-selective processes taking place along segregated visual pathways.
    Cerebral Cortex 02/2009; 19(10):2230-9. · 6.83 Impact Factor
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    Konstantinos Moutoussis, Semir Zeki
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    ABSTRACT: Several human and monkey studies have demonstrated a close relationship between motion perception and activation of area V5, leading to the general view that activity in this area correlates with the subjective experience of motion. In the present study, we investigate whether the responses of this area are still governed by the motion percept when the latter is in conflict with the reality of the physical visual stimulation. We simultaneously presented two different, specially designed random-dot kinematograms, one to each eye. These stimuli either both had a single direction of motion and worked in synergy, or had opposite motion directions and thus cancelled each other out perceptually. In this way, we were able to pit the visual stimulus (one vs. two stimulating directions) against the reported perception (directional motion vs. motion noise) of human volunteers during fMRI experiments. We found that a strong motion stimulus that is weakly perceived is more effective in activating V5 (as well as V3) than a weaker motion stimulus, which is nevertheless robustly perceived. Thus, contrary to the prevailing view of perception being the correlate of activity in higher visual areas, we show here that activity is instead dominated by the properties of the physical stimulus, raising the question of whether there is a subpopulation of cells in V5 whose activity is critical for generating the motion percept. In addition, our results provide the first robust evidence for the presence of directionally selective neuronal populations in human prestriate cortex.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 11/2008; 105(42):16362-7. · 9.74 Impact Factor
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    Andreas Bartels, Nikos K Logothetis, Konstantinos Moutoussis
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    ABSTRACT: fMRI is a tool to study brain function noninvasively that can reliably identify sites of neural involvement for a given task. However, to what extent can fMRI signals be related to measures obtained in electrophysiology? Can the blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal be interpreted as spatially pooled spiking activity? Here we combine knowledge from neurovascular coupling, functional imaging and neurophysiology to discuss whether fMRI has succeeded in demonstrating one of the most established functional properties in the visual brain, namely directional selectivity in the motion-processing region V5/MT+. We also discuss differences of fMRI and electrophysiology in their sensitivity to distinct physiological processes. We conclude that fMRI constitutes a complement, not a poor-resolution substitute, to invasive techniques, and that it deserves interpretations that acknowledge its stand as a separate signal.
    Trends in Neurosciences 10/2008; 31(9):444-53. · 13.58 Impact Factor
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    Makoto Kusunoki, Konstantinos Moutoussis, Semir Zeki
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    ABSTRACT: When objects are viewed in different illuminants, their color does not change or changes little in spite of significant changes in the wavelength composition of the light reflected from them. In previous studies, we have addressed the physiology underlying this color constancy by recording from cells in areas V1, V2, and V4 of the anesthetized monkey. Truly color-coded cells, ones that respond to a patch of a given color irrespective of the wavelength composition of the light reflected from it, were only found in area V4. In the present study, we have used a different approach to test the responses of V4 cells in both anesthetized and awake behaving monkeys. Stimuli of different colors, embedded within a Mondrian-type multicolored background, were used to identify the chromatic selectivity of neurons. The illumination of the background was then varied, and the tuning of V4 neurons was tested again for each background illumination. With anesthetized monkeys, the psychophysical effect of changing background illumination was inferred from our own experience, whereas in the awake behaving animal, it was directly reported by the monkey. We found that the majority of V4 neurons shifted their color-tuning profile with each change in the background illumination: each time the color of the background on the computer screen was changed so as to simulate a change in illumination, cells shifted their color-tuning function in the direction of the chromaticity component that had been increased. A similar shift was also observed in colored match-to-sample psychometric functions of both human and monkey. The shift in monkey psychometric functions was quantitatively equivalent to the shift in the responses of the corresponding population of cells. We conclude that neurons in area V4 exhibit the property of color constancy and that their response properties are thus able to reflect color perception.
    Journal of Neurophysiology 06/2006; 95(5):3047-59. · 3.30 Impact Factor
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    Konstantinos Moutoussis, Semir Zeki
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    ABSTRACT: A common view about visual consciousness is that it could arise when and where activity reaches some higher level of processing along the cortical hierarchy. Reports showing that activity in striate cortex can be dissociated from awareness , whereas the latter modulates activity in higher areas , point in this direction. In the specific case of visual motion, a central, "perceptual" role has been assigned to area V5: several human and monkey studies have shown V5 activity to correlate with the motion percept. Here we show that activity in this and other higher cortical areas can be also dissociated from perception and follow the physical stimulus instead. The motion information in a peripheral grating modulated fMRI responses, despite being invisible to human volunteers: under crowding conditions , areas V3A, V5, and parietal cortex still showed increased activity when the grating was moving compared to when it was flickering. We conclude that stimulus-specific activation of higher cortical areas does not necessarily result in awareness of the underlying stimulus.
    Current Biology 04/2006; 16(6):574-9. · 9.49 Impact Factor
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    K Moutoussis, G Keliris, Z Kourtzi, N Logothetis
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between brain activity and conscious visual experience is central to our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying perception. Binocular rivalry, where monocular stimuli compete for perceptual dominance, has been previously used to dissociate the constant stimulus from the varying percept. We report here fMRI results from humans experiencing binocular rivalry under a dichoptic stimulation paradigm that consisted of two drifting random dot patterns with different motion coherence. Each pattern had also a different color, which both enhanced rivalry and was used for reporting which of the two patterns was visible at each time. As the perception of the subjects alternated between coherent motion and motion noise, we examined the effect that these alternations had on the strength of the MR signal throughout the brain. Our results demonstrate that motion perception is able to modulate the activity of several of the visual areas which are known to be involved in motion processing. More specifically, in addition to area V5 which showed the strongest modulation, a higher activity during the perception of motion than during the perception of noise was also clearly observed in areas V3A and LOC, and less so in area V3. In previous studies, these areas had been selectively activated by motion stimuli but whether their activity reflects motion perception or not remained unclear; here we show that they are involved in motion perception as well. The present findings therefore suggest a lack of a clear distinction between 'processing' versus 'perceptual' areas in the brain, but rather that the areas involved in the processing of a specific visual attribute are also part of the neuronal network that is collectively responsible for its perceptual representation.
    Vision Research 09/2005; 45(17):2231-43. · 2.14 Impact Factor
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    K Moutoussis, S Zeki
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to study the relationship between cortical activity and visual perception. To do so, we developed a psychophysical technique that is able to dissociate the visual percept from the visual stimulus and thus distinguish brain activity reflecting the perceptual state from that reflecting other stages of stimulus processing. We used dichoptic color fusion to make identical monocular stimuli of opposite color contrast "disappear" at the binocular level and thus become "invisible" as far as conscious visual perception is concerned. By imaging brain activity in subjects during a discrimination task between face and house stimuli presented in this way, we found that house-specific and face-specific brain areas are always activated in a stimulus-specific way regardless of whether the stimuli are perceived. Absolute levels of cortical activation, however, were lower with invisible stimulation compared with visible stimulation. We conclude that there is no terminal "perceptual" area in the visual brain, but that the brain regions involved in processing a visual stimulus are also involved in its perception, the difference between the two being dictated by a higher level of activity in the specific brain region when the stimulus is perceived.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 08/2002; 99(14):9527-32. · 9.74 Impact Factor
  • K Moutoussis, S Zeki
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    ABSTRACT: We have recorded from wavelength-selective cells in macaque monkey visual area V2, interposed between areas V1 and V4 of the color-specialized pathway, to learn whether their responses correlate with perceived colors or are determined by the wavelength composition of light reflected from their receptive fields. All the cells we recorded from were unselective for the orientation and direction of motion of the stimulus, and all were histologically identified to be in the thin cytochrome oxidase stripes. Using multi-colored "Mondrian" scenes of the appropriate spatial configuration, areas of different color were placed in the receptive field of each cell and the entire scene illuminated by three projectors, passing long-, middle-, and short-wave light, respectively, in various combinations. Our results show that wavelength-selective cells in V2 respond to an area of any color depending on whether or not it reflects a sufficient amount of light of their preferred wavelength. In addition, the responses of a third of the cells tested were also influenced by the wavelength composition of their immediate surrounds, thus signaling the result of a local spatial comparison with respect to the amount of their preferred wavelength present. The responses of all also depended on the sequence with which their receptive fields were illuminated with light of the three different wavebands: cells were activated when there was an increase (and inhibited when there was a decrease) in the amount of their preferred wavelength with respect to the other two; the temporal route taken was therefore a determining factor, and, depending on it, cells would either respond or not to a particular combination of wavelengths. We conclude that although spatiotemporal wavelength comparisons are taking place in the color-specialized subdivisions of area V2, the determination of complete color-constant behavior at the neuronal level requires further processing, in other areas.
    Journal of Neurophysiology 05/2002; 87(4):2104-12. · 3.30 Impact Factor
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    K Moutoussis, S Zeki
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    ABSTRACT: We have used simple psychophysical methods to determine the sites of color-generating mechanisms in the brain. In our first experiment, subjects viewed an abstract multicolored "Mondrian" display through one eye and an isolated patch from the display through the other. With normal binocular/monocular viewing, the patch has a different color when viewed on its own (void mode) or as part of the Mondrian display (natural mode) [Land, E. H. (1974) Proc. R. Inst. G. B. 49, 23-58]. When the two stimuli were viewed dichoptically, with the patch occupying the position that it would occupy in the Mondrian complex under normal viewing, the patch always appeared in its void color. In a second experiment, when subjects viewed multicolored displays through a different narrow-band filter placed over each eye, the information from the two eyes was combined to result in new colors, which were not seen through either of the two eyes alone. Taken together, these results dissect color-generating mechanisms into two stages, located at different sites of the brain: The first occurs before the appearance of binocular neurons in the cortex and compares wavelength information across space, whereas the second occurs after the convergence of the input from the two eyes and synthetically combines the results of the first.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 08/2000; 97(14):8069-74. · 9.74 Impact Factor
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    S Zeki, K Moutoussis
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    ABSTRACT: Our earlier psychophysical work has shown that colour and motion are not perceived at the same time, with colour leading motion by about 50-100 ms. In pursuing this work, we thought it would be interesting to use a more complex colour stimulus, one in which the wavelength composition of the light reflected or emitted from surfaces changes continually, without entailing a change in the perceived colour (colour constancy). We therefore used a Mondrian figure--an abstract multi-coloured scene with no recognizable objects--against which squares (either red or green) moved up and down, changing colour from red to green in various phase differences with the change in direction of motion. The red and green squares changed continually in their spectral characteristics, as did every other patch on the Mondrian. The results showed that colour is still perceived before motion, by about 80 ms.
    Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 11/1997; 264(1387):1415-9. · 5.68 Impact Factor
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    K Moutoussis, S Zeki
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    ABSTRACT: In extending our previous work, we addressed the question of whether different visual attributes are perceived separately when they belong to different objects, rather than the same one. Using our earlier psychophysical method, but separating the attributes to be paired in two different halves of the screen, we found that human subjects misbind the colour and the direction of motion, or the colour and the orientation of lines, because colour, form, and motion are perceived separately and at different times. The results therefore show that there is a perceptual temporal hierarchy in vision.
    Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 11/1997; 264(1387):1407-14. · 5.68 Impact Factor
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    K Moutoussis, S Zeki
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    ABSTRACT: We have addressed the question of whether, in addition to being processed separately, colour and motion are also perceived separately. We varied continuously the colour and direction of motion of an abstract pattern of squares on a computer screen, and asked subjects to pair the colour of the pattern to its direction of motion. The results showed that subjects misbind the colour and the direction of motion because colour and motion are perceived separately and at different times, colour being perceived first. Hence the brain binds visual attributes that are perceived together, rather than ones that occur together in real time.
    Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 04/1997; 264(1380):393-9. · 5.68 Impact Factor
  • Human Brain Mapping, 2-2 (2004).
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    Vision Research, v.45, 2231-43 (2005).

Publication Stats

592 Citations
92.03 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011
    • Università Telematica "E-Campus"
      Campobasso, Molise, Italy
  • 2008–2011
    • Athens State University
      Athens, Alabama, United States
  • 1997–2009
    • University College London
      • • Department of Cell and Developmental Biology
      • • Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience
      • • Institute of Neurology
      London, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2005–2008
    • Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics
      • Department of Physiology of Cognitive Processes
      Tübingen, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany