José Fernando Castanha Henriques

University of Northern Parana, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil

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Publications (153)103.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background Orthodontic treatment can require teeth extractions, but post-treatment reopening of the extraction space is a sporadic and unexpected occurrence. The final occlusion is one of the factors mentioned in the literature that can contribute to space reopening. This study evaluated the influence of the occlusal results on extraction-site reopening. Methods The sample consisted of 44 patients with Class I or II, Division 1 malocclusion, treated with four first-premolar extractions, divided into two groups: group 1, consisting of 22 patients with an initial mean age of 13.25 years and with post-treatment reopening of the extraction site; and group 2, formed by 22 patients with an initial mean age of 12.84 years and with stability of the extraction-site closure. The pretreatment, post-treatment, and long-term post-treatment study models were used to calculate the amount of extraction-site relapse and the Peer Assessment Rating index. The groups were compared using the Student's t test. Results The relapsed group had a significantly worse occlusal finishing, and greater initial crowding was associated with better occlusal finishing. Conclusion Better occlusal finishing will decrease the probability of extraction-space reopening.
    09/2014; 3(3). DOI:10.1016/j.ejwf.2014.05.002
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    ABSTRACT: Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Class II malocclusion treatment with the Jasper Jumper and the Bionator, associated with fixed appliances. Methods The sample comprised 77 young individuals divided into 3 groups: Group 1 consisted of 25 patients treated with the Jasper Jumper appliance associated with fixed appliances for a mean period of 2.15 years; group 2 had 30 patients, treated with the Bionator and fixed appliances, for a mean treatment time of 3.92 years; and the control group included 22 subjects followed for a mean period of 2.13 years. The initial and final lateral cephalograms of the patients were evaluated. Intergroup comparison at the initial stage and of the treatment changes were performed by analysis of variance. Results Their effects consisted in a restrictive effect on the maxilla, a slight increase in anterior face height, retrusion and extrusion of the maxillary incisors, labial tipping and protrusion of the mandibular incisors in both groups and intrusion with the Jasper Jumper appliance, maxillary molar distalization with the Jasper Jumper, extrusion and mesialization of the mandibular molars, both appliances provided significant improvement of the maxillomandibular relationship, overjet, overbite and molar relationship. Conclusions The effects of both appliances in class II malocclusion treatment are similar; however, treatment with the Jasper Jumper was shorter than with the Bionator.
    Progress in Orthodontics 09/2014; 15(54). DOI:10.1186/s40510-014-0054-9
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and reliability of two methods of measurements of linear distances (multiplanar 2D and tridimensional reconstruction 3D) obtained from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with different voxel sizes.
    Journal of applied oral science: revista FOB 07/2014; DOI:10.1590/1678-775720130445 · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction In this study, we aimed to compare the relapse of maxillary and mandibular anterior crowding, overjet, and overbite 5 years after treatment in subjects with Class I and Class II malocclusions treated with and without extractions, and also to evaluate the correlations among these factors. Methods The sample comprised 84 subjects with Class I and Class II malocclusions, treated with and without extractions. Group 1 comprised 44 subjects with an initial mean age of 12.96 years treated without extractions. Group 2 included 40 subjects with an initial mean age of 13.01 years treated with 4 premolar extractions. Data were obtained from dental casts at the pretreatment, posttreatment, and long-term posttreatment stages. Intergroup comparisons were performed with t tests. To verify the correlations among the relapse of overjet, overbite, and anterior crowding, the Pearson correlation test was used. Results Maxillary incisor irregularity and its relapse in the nonextraction group were significantly greater at the long-term posttreatment stage and the long-term posttreatment period, respectively. Long-term postreatment overjet changes were similar in the groups. Overbite and its relapse were significantly greater in the extraction group in the long-term posttreatment stage and period, respectively. There was a positive correlation of the relapse of mandibular incisor crowding with the relapse of overjet and overbite, and also a correlation of overjet and overbite relapses. Conclusions There was greater maxillary crowding relapse in the nonextraction group and greater overbite relapse in the extraction group. There were significant and positive correlations of overjet and overbite relapses with mandibular anterior crowding relapse and consequently between overjet and overbite relapses.
    American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics 07/2014; 146(1):67–72. DOI:10.1016/j.ajodo.2014.04.012 · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The objective of this study was to identify the patterns of dental variables of adolescent Japanese-Brazilian descents with normal occlusion, and also to compare them with a similar Caucasian and Mongoloid sample. Methods Lateral cephalometric radiographs were used to compare the groups: Caucasian (n = 40), Japanese-Brazilian (n = 32) and Mongoloid (n = 33). The statistical tests used were one-way ANOVA and ANCOVA. The cephalometric measurements used followed the analyses of Steiner, Tweed and McNamara Jr. Results Statistical differences (P < 0.05) indicated a smaller interincisal angle and overbite for the Japanese-Brazilian sample, when compared to the Caucasian sample, although with similar values to the Mongoloid group. Conclusion The dental patterns found for the Japanese-Brazilian descents were, in general, more similar to those of the Mongoloid sample.
    07/2014; 19(4):50-7. DOI:10.1590/2176-9451.19.4.050-057.oar
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    Ruben Leon-Salazar · Guilherme Janson · José Fernando Castanha Henriques · Vladimir Leon-Salazar
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The aim of this retrospective study was to compare the occlusal outcomes, duration and efficiency of Class I malocclusion treatment carried out with and without premolar extractions in patients with different degrees of initial malocclusion severity. Methods Complete records of 111 patients were obtained and divided into two groups: Group 1 consisted of 65 patients at an initial mean age of 13.82 years old treated with four premolar extractions; whereas Group 2 consisted of 46 patients at an initial mean age of 14.01 years old treated without extractions. Two subgroups were obtained from each group (1A, 1B, 2A and 2B) with different degrees of malocclusion severity according to the initial values of PAR index. Compatibility was assessed using chi-square and t-tests. The subgroups were compared by means of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA).The variables that might be related to treatment duration and efficiency were assessed using the multiple linear regression analysis. Results Initial malocclusion severity was positively related to the amount of occlusal correction and consequently to a higher efficiency index. Moreover, extraction protocol showed a positive relationship with treatment duration and a negative relationship with treatment efficiency. Conclusion Extraction and non-extraction protocols for correction of Class I malocclusion provide similar satisfactory results; however, the extraction protocol increases the overall treatment duration. Orthodontic treatment is more efficient in cases with high initial malocclusion severity treated with a non-extraction protocol.
    07/2014; 19(4):38-49. DOI:10.1590/2176-9451.19.4.038-049.oar
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The aim of this study was to cephalometrically assess the skeletal and dentoalveolar effects of Class II malocclusion treatment performed with the Jones Jig appliance followed by fixed appliances. Methods The sample comprised 25 patients with Class II malocclusion treated with the Jones Jig appliance followed by fixed appliances, at a mean initial age of 12.90 years old. The mean time of the entire orthodontic treatment was 3.89 years. The distalization phase lasted for 0.85 years, after which the fixed appliance was used for 3.04 years. Cephalograms were used at initial (T1), post-distalization (T2) and final phases of treatment (T3). For intragroup comparison of the three phases evaluated, dependent ANOVA and Tukey tests were used. Results Jones Jig appliance did not interfere in the maxillary and mandibular component and did not change maxillomandibular relationship. Jones Jig appliance promoted distalization of first molars with anchorage loss, mesialization and significant extrusion of first and second premolars, as well as a significant increase in anterior face height at the end of treatment. The majority of adverse effects that occur during intraoral distalization are subsequently corrected during corrective mechanics. Buccal inclination and protrusion of mandibular incisors were identified. By the end of treatment, correction of overjet and overbite was observed. Conclusions Jones Jig appliance promoted distalization of first molars with anchorage loss represented by significant mesial movement and extrusion of first and second premolars, in addition to a significant increase in anterior face height.
    05/2014; 19(3):44-51. DOI:10.1590/2176-9451.19.3.044-051.oar
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to cephalometrically compare the skeletal and dentoalveolar effects in the treatment of Class II malocclusion with Pendulum and Jones jig appliances, followed by fixed corrective orthodontics, and to compare such effects to a control group. The sample was divided into three groups. Group 1: 18 patients treated with Pendulum, Group 2: 25 patients treated with Jones jig, and Group 3: 19 young subjects with untreated Class II malocclusions and initial mean age of 12.88 years. The chi-square test was applied to assess severity and gender distribution. Groups 1 and 2 were compared to the control group by means of the one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests in order to differentiate treatment changes from those occurred by craniofacial growth. There were no significant changes among the three groups with regard to the components of the maxilla and the mandible, maxillomandibular relationship, cephalometric and tegumental pattern. Buccal tipping of mandibular incisors was significantly greater in the experimental groups and increased mesial angulation of the maxillary second molars was found in the Jones jig group. In the experimental groups, dental relationship, overbite and overjet were corrected. It can be stated that the distalization achieved its purpose of correcting the Class II.
    12/2013; 18(6):58-64. DOI:10.1590/S2176-94512013000600010
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: This prospective study assessed the stability of Class II treatment with the Bionator, followed by fixed appliances, 10 years after treatment. Material and Methods: The experimental group comprised 23 patients of both sexes (10 boys, 13 girls) at a mean initial age of 11.74 years (late mixed or early permanent dentitions), treated for a mean period of 3.55 years who were evaluated at three stages: initial (T1), final (T2) and long-term posttreatment (T3). A total of 69 lateral cephalograms were evaluated and 69 dental casts were measured using the PAR index. The difference between initial and final PAR indexes, the percentage of occlusal improvement obtained with therapy and the percentage of relapse were calculated, using the PAR index. The variables were compared by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey tests. Results: The significant improvement in apical base relationship, the palatal inclination of the maxillary incisors and the labial inclination of the mandibular incisors, and the significant improvement in molar relationship and reduction of overjet and overbite, obtained with treatment, remained stable in the long-term posttreatment period. There was also significant improvement in the occlusal relationships which remained stable in the long-term posttreatment period. The percentage of occlusal improvement obtained was of 81.78% and the percentage of relapse was of 4.90%. Conclusions: Treatment of Class II division 1 malocclusions with the Bionator associated with fixed appliances showed to be stable in the long-term posttreatment period.
    Journal of applied oral science: revista FOB 11/2013; 21(6):547-53. DOI:10.1590/1679-775720130002 · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This retrospective study aimed to conduct a cephalometric evaluation of the skeletal, dental and soft tissue effects resulting from treatment of adult patients presenting Class II malocclusion, performed with a Mandibular Protraction Appliance (MPA) combined with a fixed orthodontic appliance. The sample consisted of teleradiographs obtained before and after treatment of 9 adult patients (initial mean age of 22.48 years) with bilateral Class II, division 1, malocclusion. Paired t test (p < 0.05) was applied to compare initial and final values. t test revealed an increase in anteroinferior facial height and posterior facial height. The dental changes include: extrusion of upper incisors, buccal inclination, protrusion of lower incisors, mesialization and extrusion of mandibular molars. Regarding the soft tissue component, there was an increase in nasolabial angle in addition to upper lip retrusion. The effects of treating Class II malocclusion adult patients, by means of using Mandibular Protraction Appliance (MPA) combined with a fixed appliance were mostly observed in the mandibular arch, and consisted of buccal inclination, protrusion and intrusion of incisors, and mesialization and extrusion of the molars.
    10/2013; 18(5):46-52. DOI:10.1590/S2176-94512013000500009
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The aim of this study was to compare the dentoskeletal changes of patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion treated with either the Jasper jumper appliance or the activator-headgear combination, both associated with fixed appliances. Methods The sample comprised 72 subjects with Class II Division 1 malocclusion divided into 3 groups: group 1 included 25 subjects treated with fixed appliances and the force modules of the Jasper jumper at an initial mean age of 12.72 years, group 2 included 25 subjects treated with the activator-headgear combination followed by fixed appliances at an initial mean age of 11.07 years, and group 3 included 22 untreated subjects at an initial mean age of 12.67 years. Initial cephalometric characteristics and dentoskeletal changes were compared with analysis of variance. Results Both experimental groups had similar dentoskeletal changes: restrictive effect on the maxilla, clockwise mandibular rotation and a slight increase in anterior face height, retrusion of the maxillary incisors, distalization of the maxillary molars, protrusion of the mandibular incisors, extrusion of the mandibular molars, and significant improvements of the maxillomandibular relationship, overjet, overbite, and the molar relationship. Conclusions The effects of the Jasper jumper and the activator-headgear combination followed by fixed orthodontic appliances were similar in Class II malocclusion treatment.
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    ABSTRACT: To observe the presence of sexual dimorphism and compare the mesiodistal width of the teeth in Caucasian, African and Japanese individuals with Brazilian ancestry not orthodontically treated and with normal occlusion. One hundred pairs of dental casts were used. It was measured, from first molar to first molar in both arches, the teeth's mesiodistal widths, using a digital caliper. For the statistical analysis of results Kolmogorov-Smirnov, t test, ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05) were used. Sexual dimorphism occurred on the three evaluated groups, and the highest mesiodistal widths were found in males. There was statistically significant difference between racial groups in all evaluated teeth in males. However, in females, this same difference was found only on upper lateral incisor and first molar; and lower lateral incisor, canine, first premolar and first molar. Most of mesiodistal measures present particular characteristics in relation to gender, with higher values for males, and to race, with a tendency for African to present greater mesiodistal distance of the teeth, followed by Japanese and Caucasians, respectively, important for the correct diagnosis and orthodontic planning.
    06/2013; 18(3):130-135. DOI:10.1590/S2176-94512013000300021
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: To analyze the effect of low-level laser on bone remodeling during induced tooth movement in rats. Materials and Methods: A diode laser (808 nm, 100 mW, 54 J on an area of 0.0028 cm(2)) was used. The application was continuous, punctual, and with contact. Forty-two 70-day-old Wistar rats had the maxillary left first molar moved using a force level of 25 g. In two experimental subgroups the movement was performed over 7 days and in three subgroups the movement occurred over 14 days. In the 7-day movement subgroups, one subgroup received laser irradiation on day 1 only; the other subgroup received laser irradiation on days 1, 3, and 5. In the 14-day movement subgroups, one subgroup received laser irradiation on day 1 only; the second on days 1, 3, and 5; and the third on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13. The control group was also divided into two subgroups, and movement occurred over two different periods of treatment (7 days and 14 days) without laser application; these were used as controls for the respective experimental subgroups. Inter-subgroup comparison was performed with Kruskal-Wallis, followed by Mann-Whitney and analysis of variance, followed by Tukey tests within the 7- and 14-day subgroups. Results: The subgroup with three laser applications showed significantly greater osteoclastic activity and bone resorption than the other subgroups in the 7-day movement subgroups. Conclusions: Low-level laser application significantly increased the osteoclastic but not the osteoblastic activity during the initial phases of tooth movement. In addition, the osteoclastic activity was dose-dependent.
    The Angle Orthodontist 05/2013; DOI:10.2319/100812-789.1 · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to compare the dentoskeletal changes of patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion treated with either the Jasper jumper appliance or the activator-headgear combination, both associated with fixed appliances. The sample comprised 72 subjects with Class II Division 1 malocclusion divided into 3 groups: group 1 included 25 subjects treated with fixed appliances and the force modules of the Jasper jumper at an initial mean age of 12.72 years, group 2 included 25 subjects treated with the activator-headgear combination followed by fixed appliances at an initial mean age of 11.07 years, and group 3 included 22 untreated subjects at an initial mean age of 12.67 years. Initial cephalometric characteristics and dentoskeletal changes were compared with analysis of variance. Both experimental groups had similar dentoskeletal changes: restrictive effect on the maxilla, clockwise mandibular rotation and a slight increase in anterior face height, retrusion of the maxillary incisors, distalization of the maxillary molars, protrusion of the mandibular incisors, extrusion of the mandibular molars, and significant improvements of the maxillomandibular relationship, overjet, overbite, and the molar relationship. The effects of the Jasper jumper and the activator-headgear combination followed by fixed orthodontic appliances were similar in Class II malocclusion treatment.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 05/2013; 143(5):684-94. DOI:10.1016/j.ajodo.2013.01.009 · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aims of this meta-analysis were to quantify and to compare the amounts of distalization and anchorage loss of conventional and skeletal anchorage methods in the correction of Class II malocclusion with intraoral distalizers. The literature was searched through 5 electronic databases, and inclusion criteria were applied. Articles that presented pretreatment and posttreatment cephalometric values were preferred. Quality assessments of the studies were performed. The averages and standard deviations of molar and premolar effects were extracted from the studies to perform a meta-analysis. After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 40 studies were included in the systematic review. After the quality analysis, 2 articles were classified as high quality, 27 as medium quality, and 11 as low quality. For the meta-analysis, 6 studies were included, and they showed average molar distalization amounts of 3.34 mm with conventional anchorage and 5.10 mm with skeletal anchorage. The meta-analysis of premolar movement showed estimates of combined effects of 2.30 mm (mesialization) in studies with conventional anchorage and -4.01 mm (distalization) in studies with skeletal anchorage. There was scientific evidence that both anchorage systems are effective for distalization; however, with skeletal anchorage, there was no anchorage loss when direct anchorage was used.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 05/2013; 143(5):602-15. DOI:10.1016/j.ajodo.2012.11.024 · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the stability of molar relationship after non-extraction treatment of Class II malocclusion. The sample comprised 39 subjects (16 females, 23 males) with initial Class II malocclusion treated with no extractions, using fixed appliances. Mean age at the beginning of treatment was 12.94 years, at the end of treatment was 15.14 years and at post-retention stage was 21.18 years. Mean treatment time was 2.19 years and mean time of post-treatment evaluation was 6.12 years. To verify the influence of the severity of initial Class II molar relationship in stability of molar relationship, the sample was divided into two groups, one presenting a ½-cusp or ¾-cusp Class II molar relationship, and the other with full-cusp Class II molar relationship. In dental casts from initial, final and post-retention stages, molar, first and second premolars and canine relationships were measured. Data obtained were analyzed by dependent ANOVA, Tukey and Pearson's correlation tests, as well as independent t test between the two groups divided by severity of initial molar relationship. There was a non-statistically significant 0.12-mm relapse of molar relationship. The initial severity of Class II molar relationship was not correlated to relapse in the post-retention period. When compared, the two groups showed no difference in relapse of molar relationship. It was concluded that correction of Class II molar relationship is stable and initial severity does not influence relapse of molar relationship.
    04/2013; 18(2):42-54. DOI:10.1590/S2176-94512013000200013
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate healing time before loading, areas compression and tension and location of insertion on mini-implant stability. DESIGN: Six minipigs were used. Each animal received 3 mini-implants in each quadrant: 1 mini-implant was used as an unloaded control (G1, n=24); the other 2 were loaded with 150g-force at three time intervals (G2: immediate loading, G3: after 15 days and G4: after 30 days), with 16 mini-implant in each experimental group. After 120 days, tissue blocks of the areas of interest were harvested. Clinical analysis (exact Fisher test) determined the survival rate. Histological analysis (Kontron KS 300™, Zeiss) quantified the fractional bone-to-implant contact (%BIC) and bone area (%BA) at each healing time point, areas of interest, and insertion site (ANOVA and t tests for dependent and independent samples). RESULTS: The mini-implant survival rates were G1: 71%, G2: 50%, G3: 75% and G4: 63%, with no statistical differences between them. The groups presented similar %BIC and %BA. There were no differences between the compression and tension sides or maxillary and mandibular insertion sites. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that low-intensity immediate or early orthodontic loading does not affect mini-implant stability, because similar histomorphometric results were observed for all the groups, with partial osseointegration of the mini-implants present.
    Archives of oral biology 01/2013; 58(7). DOI:10.1016/j.archoralbio.2012.12.010 · 1.88 Impact Factor
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    Kelly Chiqueto · José Fernando Castanha Henriques · Sérgio Estelita Cavalcante Barros · Guilherme Janson
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the effects produced by the MARA appliance in the treatment of Angle's Class II, division 1 malocclusion. The sample consisted of 44 young patients divided into two groups: The MARA Group, with initial mean age of 11.99 years, treated with the MARA appliance for an average period of 1.11 years, and the Control Group, with initial mean age of 11.63 years, monitored for a mean period of 1.18 years with no treatment. Lateral cephalograms were used to compare the groups using cephalometric variables in the initial and final phases. For these comparisons, Student's t test was employed. MARA appliance produced the following effects: Maxillary growth restriction, no change in mandibular development, improvement in maxillomandibular relationship, increased lower anterior facial height and counterclockwise rotation of the functional occlusal plane. In the upper arch, the incisors moved lingually and retruded, while the molars moved distally and tipped distally. In the lower arch, the incisors proclined and protruded, whereas the molars mesialized and tipped mesially. Finally, there was a significant reduction in overbite and overjet, with an obvious improvement in molar relationship. It was concluded that the MARA appliance proved effective in correcting Angle's Class II, division 1 malocclusion while inducing skeletal changes and particularly dental changes.
    01/2013; 18(1):35-44. DOI:10.1590/S2176-94512013000100011
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    ABSTRACT: Skeletal, dental and profile discrepancies can be amended by using functional orthodontic appliances. This study is a report of the treatment of a patient, 11 years and 4 months old, with Class II, division 1, malocclusion, convex profile, protrusion of upper incisors, pronounced overjet and overbite, and mild crowding. The patient was treated with a Jasper Jumper associated to fixed appliances for 6 months and Class II intermaxillary elastics (3/16-in) during the last 4 months. After debonding, a Hawley retainer was used during daytime and a modified Bionator for night use during one year. In the lower dental arch a bonded lingual retainer was used. This treatment combination improved the profile, as well as the overjet, overbite and molar relation. There was clockwise mandibular rotation and increase of lower anterior facial height. The lower incisors were protruded and extruded and the lower molars were extruded. The centric occlusal relation was checked and it was coincident to the maximum usual intercuspation. It was demonstrated that the Jasper Jumper is an efficient alternative to Class II malocclusion treatment, providing improvement in the facial profile, although the changes are more dentoalveolar than skeletal.
    01/2013; 18(2):22-9. DOI:10.1590/S2176-94512013000200010
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    Vanessa Scherer Porto · José Fernando Castanha Henriques · Guilherme Janson · Marcos Roberto de Freitas · Arnaldo Pinzan
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this retrospective study was to compare, by means of lateral cephalograms, the facial growth pattern changes due to the treatment with and without extractions of four first premolars in dolichofacial individuals. METHODS: Groups 1 and 2 were constituted of 23 dolichofacial patients each, with Class II malocclusion, division 1 and initial age average of 12.36 and 12.29 years, respectively. Patients from Group 1 were treated without extractions and Group 2 was treated with extraction of the four first premolars, given that both used occipital headgear. Groups were compatibilized according to age, treatment period, gender and malocclusion severity. The t test was applied for intergroups comparison. RESULTS: Most variables (SN.PP, SN.Ocl and FMA) did not present statistically significant difference between groups. CONCLUSION: Although the treatment with extractions tend to reduce the mandibular plane angle (SN.GoGn) and the facial axis (NS.Gn), the analyzed treatment protocols did not affect in a clinically relevant way the facial growth pattern.
    12/2012; 17(6):69-75. DOI:10.1590/S2176-94512012000600016

Publication Stats

1k Citations
103.25 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013–2014
    • University of Northern Parana
      Londrina, Paraná, Brazil
  • 2003–2014
    • University of São Paulo
      • Department of Stomatology (Baurú)
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2007
    • Universidade Federal de São Paulo
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2002
    • Methodist University
      Fayetteville, North Carolina, United States
    • University of Campinas
      Conceição de Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil