Mark J Cowley

The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia

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Publications (57)534.05 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The study of mammalian development has offered many insights into the molecular aetiology of cancer. We previously used analysis of mammary morphogenesis to discover a critical role for GATA-3 in mammary developmental and carcinogenesis. In recent years an important role for microRNAs (miRNAs) in a myriad of cellular processes in development and in oncogenesis has emerged. microRNA profiling was conducted on stromal and epithelial cellular subsets microdissected from the pubertal mouse mammary gland. miR-184 was reactivated by transient or stable overexpression in breast cancer cell lines and examined using a series of in vitro (proliferation, tumour-sphere and protein synthesis) assays. Orthotopic xenografts of breast cancer cells were used to assess the effect of miR-184 on tumourigenesis as well as distant metastasis. Interactions between miR-184 and its putative targets were assessed by quantitative PCR, microarray, bioinformatics and 3' untranslated region Luciferase reporter assay. The methylation status of primary patient samples was determined by MBD-Cap sequencing. Lastly, the clinical prognostic significance of miR-184 putative targets was assessed using publicly available datasets. A large number of microRNA were restricted in their expression to specific tissue subsets. MicroRNA-184 (miR-184) was exclusively expressed in epithelial cells and markedly upregulated during differentiation of the proliferative, invasive cells of the pubertal terminal end bud (TEB) into ductal epithelial cells in vivo. miR-184 expression was silenced in mouse tumour models compared to non-transformed epithelium and in a majority of breast cancer cell line models. Ectopic reactivation of miR-184 inhibited the proliferation and self-renewal of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines in vitro and delayed primary tumour formation and reduced metastatic burden in vivo. Gene expression studies uncovered multi-factorial regulation of genes in the AKT/mTORC1 pathway by miR-184. In clinical breast cancer tissues, expression of miR-184 is lost in primary TNBCs while the miR-184 promoter is methylated in a subset of lymph node metastases from TNBC patients. These studies elucidate a new layer of regulation in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway with relevance to mammary development and tumour progression and identify miR-184 as a putative breast tumour suppressor.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 06/2015; 17(1):83. DOI:10.1186/s13058-015-0593-0 · 5.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal of malignancies and a major health burden. We performed whole-genome sequencing and copy number variation (CNV) analysis of 100 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Chromosomal rearrangements leading to gene disruption were prevalent, affecting genes known to be important in pancreatic cancer (TP53, SMAD4, CDKN2A, ARID1A and ROBO2) and new candidate drivers of pancreatic carcinogenesis (KDM6A and PREX2). Patterns of structural variation (variation in chromosomal structure) classified PDACs into 4 subtypes with potential clinical utility: the subtypes were termed stable, locally rearranged, scattered and unstable. A significant proportion harboured focal amplifications, many of which contained druggable oncogenes (ERBB2, MET, FGFR1, CDK6, PIK3R3 and PIK3CA), but at low individual patient prevalence. Genomic instability co-segregated with inactivation of DNA maintenance genes (BRCA1, BRCA2 or PALB2) and a mutational signature of DNA damage repair deficiency. Of 8 patients who received platinum therapy, 4 of 5 individuals with these measures of defective DNA maintenance responded.
    Nature 02/2015; 518(7540):495-501. DOI:10.1038/nature14169 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND Inherited predisposition to pancreatic cancer contributes significantly to its incidence and presents an opportunity for the development of early detection strategies. The genetic basis of predisposition remains unexplained in a high proportion of patients with familial PC (FPC).METHODS Clinicopathologic features were assessed in a cohort of 766 patients who had been diagnosed with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PC). Patients were classified with FPC if they had ≥1 affected first-degree relatives; otherwise, they were classified with sporadic PC (SPC).RESULTSThe prevalence of FPC in this cohort was 8.9%. In FPC families with an affected parent-child pair, 71% in the subsequent generation were 12.3 years younger at diagnosis. Patients with FPC had more first-degree relatives who had an extrapancreatic malignancy (EPM) (42.6% vs 21.2; P<.0001), particularly melanoma and endometrial cancer, but not a personal history of EPM. Patients with SPC were more likely to be active smokers, have higher cumulative tobacco exposure, and have fewer multifocal precursor lesions, but these were not associated with differences in survival. Long-standing diabetes mellitus (>2 years) was associated with poor survival in both groups.CONCLUSIONSFPC represents 9% of PC, and the risk of malignancy in kindred does not appear to be confined to the pancreas. Patients with FPC have more precursor lesions and include fewer active smokers, but other clinicopathologic factors and outcome are similar to those in patients with SPC. Furthermore, some FPC kindreds may exhibit anticipation. A better understanding of the clinical features of PC will facilitate efforts to uncover novel susceptibility genes and the development of early detection strategies. Cancer 2014. © 2014 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 12/2014; 120(23). DOI:10.1002/cncr.28863 · 4.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The transcription factor SOX9 was recently shown to stimulate ductal gene expression in pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and to accelerate development of premalignant lesions preceding pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here, we investigate how SOX9 operates in pancreatic tumourigenesis.
    Gut 10/2014; DOI:10.1136/gutjnl-2014-307075 · 13.32 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Research 10/2014; 74(19 Supplement):LB-73-LB-73. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2014-LB-73 · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Predictive biomarkers are required to identify patients who may benefit from the use of BH3 mimetics such as ABT-263. This study investigated the efficacy of ABT-263 against a panel of patient-derived pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) xenografts and utilized cell and molecular approaches to identify biomarkers that predict in vivo ABT-263 sensitivity. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The in vivo efficacy of ABT-263 was tested against a panel of 31 patient-derived ALL xenografts composed of MLL-, BCP-, and T-ALL subtypes. Basal gene expression profiles of ALL xenografts were analyzed and confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, protein expression and BH3 profiling. An in vitro coculture assay with immortalized human mesenchymal cells was utilized to build a predictive model of in vivo ABT-263 sensitivity. RESULTS: ABT-263 demonstrated impressive activity against pediatric ALL xenografts, with 19 of 31 achieving objective responses. Among BCL2 family members, in vivo ABT-263 sensitivity correlated best with low MCL1 mRNA expression levels. BH3 profiling revealed that resistance to ABT-263 correlated with mitochondrial priming by NOXA peptide, suggesting a functional role for MCL1 protein. Using an in vitro coculture assay, a predictive model of in vivo ABT-263 sensitivity was built. Testing this model against 11 xenografts predicted in vivo ABT-263 responses with high sensitivity (50%) and specificity (100%). CONCLUSION: These results highlight the in vivo efficacy of ABT-263 against a broad range of pediatric ALL subtypes and shows that a combination of in vitro functional assays can be used to predict its in vivo efficacy.
    Clinical Cancer Research 06/2014; 20(17). DOI:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-14-0259 · 8.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The importance of epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation in tumorigenesis is increasingly being appreciated. To define the genome-wide pattern of DNA methylation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC), we captured the methylation profiles of 167 untreated resected PDACs and compared them to a panel of 29 adjacent non-transformed pancreata using high-density arrays. A total of 11,634 CpG sites associated with 3,522 genes were significantly differentially methylated (DM) in PDAC and were capable of segregating PDAC from non-malignant pancreas, regardless of tumour cellularity. As expected, PDAC hyper-methylation was most prevalent in the 5' region of genes (including the proximal promoter, 5'UTR and CpG islands). Approximately 33% DM genes showed significant inverse correlation with mRNA expression levels. Pathway analysis revealed an enrichment of aberrantly methylated genes involved in key molecular mechanisms important to PDAC: TGF-β, WNT, integrin signaling, cell adhesion, stellate cell activation and axon guidance. Given the recent discovery that SLIT-ROBO mutations play a clinically important role in PDAC, the role of epigenetic perturbation of axon guidance was pursued in more detail. Bisulfite amplicon deep sequencing and qRT-PCR expression analyses confirmed recurrent perturbation of axon guidance pathway genes SLIT2, SLIT3, ROBO1, ROBO3, ITGA2 and MET and suggests epigenetic suppression of SLIT-ROBO signaling and up-regulation of MET and ITGA2 expression. Hypo-methylation of MET and ITGA2 correlated with high gene expression, which was associated with poor survival. These data suggest that aberrant methylation plays an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis affecting core signaling pathways with potential implications for the disease pathophysiology and therapy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    International Journal of Cancer 02/2014; DOI:10.1002/ijc.28765 · 5.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal and molecularly diverse malignancies. Although HER2 amplification occurs in pancreatic cancer, it is inadequately characterised to define its clinical relevance and to exploit the potential of anti-HER2 therapies. We aim to characterise the clinicopathological features of HER2 amplified pancreatic cancer. Our work extends the clinical relevance of our effect as part of the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative (APGI) in cataloguing genomic aberrations that characterise pancreatic cancer. 469 cases of surgically resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) from 12 institutions associated with the APGI from 1990 to 2012 were assessed for HER2 overexpression by immunohistochemistry and HER2 gene amplification by in situ hybridization. 55 of these cases were also assessed for DNA copy number changes and mRNA expression. HER2 amplification was found in 10 of 469 (2.1%) of samples. HER2 gene amplification was found in 100% (7/7) of HER2 3+, 11% (3/27) of HER2 2+ and none of 1+ overexpressiong tumours. In all but one case, HER2 overexpression was uniform throughout tumours rather than showing clonal heterogeneity. HER2 amplification was associated with moderately differentiated tumours with distinctive macroglandular morphology. HER2 amplified tumours were also distinctive in their pattern of metastasis, with involvement of the lung ± brain without liver metastasis. HER2 amplification occurs in 2% of PDAC and has distinct clinicopathological features with implications to clinical practice. The molecular heterogeneity of PDAC implies that even an incidence of 2% represents an attractive target for anti-HER2 therapies, as options for PDAC are limited. Recruiting patients based on HER2 amplification rather than organ of origin could make clinical trials of anti-HER2 therapies more feasible but needs to be well defined with robust diagnostic assays.
    Pathology 02/2014; 46 Suppl 1:S109-10. DOI:10.1097/01.PAT.0000443700.20071.fa · 2.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The HER2 (ERBB2) and MYC genes are commonly amplified in breast cancer, yet little is known about their molecular and clinical interaction. Using a novel chimeric mammary transgenic approach and in vitro models, we demonstrate markedly increased self-renewal and tumour-propagating capability of cells transformed with Her2 and c-Myc. Coexpression of both oncoproteins in cultured cells led to the activation of a c-Myc transcriptional signature and acquisition of a self-renewing phenotype independent of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition programme or regulation of conventional cancer stem cell markers. Instead, Her2 and c-Myc cooperated to induce the expression of lipoprotein lipase, which was required for proliferation and self-renewal in vitro. HER2 and MYC were frequently coamplified in breast cancer, associated with aggressive clinical behaviour and poor outcome. Lastly, we show that in HER2(+) breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy (but not targeted anti-Her2 therapy), MYC amplification is associated with a poor outcome. These findings demonstrate the importance of molecular and cellular context in oncogenic transformation and acquisition of a malignant stem-like phenotype and have diagnostic and therapeutic consequences for the clinical management of HER2(+) breast cancer.Oncogene advance online publication, 23 September 2013; doi:10.1038/onc.2013.368.
    Oncogene 09/2013; DOI:10.1038/onc.2013.368 · 8.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal and molecularly diverse malignancies. Repurposing of therapeutics that target specific molecular mechanisms in different disease types offers potential for rapid improvements in outcome. Although HER2 amplification occurs in pancreatic cancer, it is inadequately characterized to exploit the potential of anti-HER2 therapies. HER2 amplification was detected and further analyzed using multiple genomic sequencing approaches. Standardized reference laboratory assays defined HER2 amplification in a large cohort of patients (n = 469) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). An amplified inversion event (1 MB) was identified at the HER2 locus in a patient with PDAC. Using standardized laboratory assays we established diagnostic criteria for HER2 amplification in PDAC, and observed a prevalence of 2%. Clinically, HER2 amplified PDAC was characterized by a lack of liver metastases, and preponderance of lung and brain metastases. Excluding breast and gastric cancer, the incidence of HER2-amplified cancers in the USA is >22,000 per annum. HER2 amplification occurs in 2% of PDAC and has distinct features with implications for clinical practice. The molecular heterogeneity of PDAC implies that even an incidence of 2% represents an attractive target for anti-HER2 therapies, as options for PDAC are limited. Recruiting patients based on HER2 amplification, rather than organ of origin, could make trials of anti-HER2 therapies feasible in less common cancer types.
    Genome Medicine 08/2013; 5(8):78. DOI:10.1186/gm482 · 4.94 Impact Factor
  • Cancer Research 08/2013; 73(8 Supplement):1156-1156. DOI:10.1158/1538-7445.AM2013-1156 · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are responsible for the fibrotic matrix of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. In vitro protocols examining PSC biology have usually involved PSCs cultured on plastic, a non-physiological surface. However, PSCs cultured on physiological matrices e.g. Matrigel™ (normal basement membrane) and collagen (fibrotic pancreas), may have distinctly different behaviours compared to cells cultured on plastic. Therefore, we aimed to i) compare PSC gene expression after culture on plastic, Matrigel™ and collagen I; ii) validate the gene array data for transgelin, the most highly dysregulated gene in PSCs grown on activating versus non-activating matrices, at mRNA and protein levels; iii) examine the role of transgelin in PSC function; and iv) assess transgelin expression in human chronic pancreatitis sections. Culture of PSCs on different matrices significantly affected their gene expression pattern. 146, 619 and 432 genes respectively were differentially expressed (p<0.001) in PSCs cultured on collagen I vs Matrigel™, Matrigel™ vs plastic and collagen I vs plastic. The highest fold change (12.5 fold upregulation) in gene expression in cells on collagen I vs Matrigel™, was observed for transgelin (an actin stress fibre associated protein). Transgelin was significantly increased in activated PSCs versus quiescent PSCs. Silencing transgelin expression decreased PSC proliferation and also reduced PDGF-induced PSC migration. Notably, transgelin was highly expressed in chronic pancreatitis in stromal areas and peri-acinar spaces but was absent in acinar cells. These findings suggest that transgelin is a potentially useful target protein to modulate PSC function so as to ameliorate pancreatic fibrosis.
    AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 07/2013; DOI:10.1152/ajpgi.00016.2013 · 3.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Overexpression of the anti-apoptotic factor, BCL-2, is a frequent feature of malignant disease and is commonly associated with poor prognosis and resistance to conventional chemotherapy. In breast cancer, however, high BCL-2 expression is associated with favourable prognosis, estrogen receptor (ER) positivity and low tumour grade; whilst low expression is included in several molecular signatures associated with resistance to endocrine therapy. In the present study, we correlate BCL-2 expression and DNA methylation profiles in human breast cancer and in multiple cell models of acquired endocrine-resistance to determine whether BCL-2 hypermethylation could provide a useful biomarker of response to cytotoxic therapy. In human disease, diminished expression of BCL-2 was associated with hypermethylation of the second exon, in a region that overlapped a CpG island and an ER-binding site. Hypermethylation of this region, which occurred in 10% of primary tumours, provided a stronger predictor of patient survival (p=0.019) when compared to gene expression (n=522). In multiple cell-models of acquired endocrine-resistance, BCL-2 expression was significantly reduced in parallel with increased DNA methylation of the exon 2 region. The reduction of BCL-2 expression in endocrine-resistant cells lowered their apoptotic threshold to anti-mitotic agents: nocodazole, paclitaxel and the PLK1 inhibitor, BI2536. This phenomenon could be reversed with ectopic expression of BCL-2, and rescued with the BCL-2 inhibitor, ABT-737. Collectively, these data imply that BCL-2 hypermethylation provides a robust biomarker of response to current and next generation cytotoxic agents in endocrine-resistant breast cancer, which may prove beneficial in directing therapeutic strategy for patients with non-resectable, metastatic disease.
    Molecular Cancer Therapeutics 07/2013; 12(9). DOI:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-13-0012 · 6.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Metastasis, the leading cause of cancer death, requires tumor cell intravasation, migration through the bloodstream, arrest within capillaries, and extravasation to invade distant tissues. Few mechanistic details have been reported thus far regarding the extravasation process or re-entry of circulating tumor cells at metastatic sites. Here, we demonstrate that neuropilin-2 (NRP-2), a multi-functional non-kinase receptor for semaphorins, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and other growth factors, expressed on cancer cells interacts with α5 integrin on endothelial cells to mediate vascular extravasation and metastasis in zebrafish and murine xenograft models of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In tissue from RCC patients, NRP-2 expression is positively correlated with tumor grade and highest in metastatic tumors. In a prospectively acquired cohort of patients with pancreatic cancer, high NRP-2 expression co-segregated with poor prognosis. Through biochemical approaches as well as Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), we describe a unique mechanism through which NRP-2 expressed on cancer cells interacts with α5 integrin on endothelial cells to mediate vascular adhesion and extravasation. Taken together, our studies reveal a clinically significant role of NRP-2 in cancer cell extravasation and promotion of metastasis.
    Cancer Research 05/2013; 73(14). DOI:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-0529 · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in our society, with a mortality that virtually parallels its incidence, a median survival of <12 months even with maximal therapy, and a 5-year survival rate of <5 %. The diversity of clinical outcomes and the molecular heterogeneity of histopathologically similar cancer types, incomplete knowledge of the genomic aberrations that drive carcinogenesis and the lack of therapeutics that specifically target most known genomic aberrations necessitates large-scale detailed analysis of cancer genomes to identify novel potential therapeutic strategies. As part of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC), the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative (APGI) used exomic sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations that characterize a large, clinically focused, prospectively accrued cohort of patients with pancreatic cancer. The cohort consisted of early (clinical stages I and II) non-pre-treated patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma who underwent operative resection with curative intent. We devised approaches to adjust for low epithelial content in primary tumours and to define the genomic landscape of pancreatic cancer to identify novel candidate driver genes and mechanisms. We aim to develop stratified, molecular phenotype-guided therapeutic strategies using existing therapeutics that are either rescued, repurposed, in development, or are known to be effective in an undefined subgroup of PC patients. These are then tested in primary patient-derived xenografts and cell lines from the above deeply characterized cohort. In addition, we return information to treating clinicians that influences patient care and are launching a clinical trial called IMPaCT (Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy). This umbrella design trial randomizes patients with metastatic disease to either standard first-line therapy with gemcitabine, or a molecular phenotype-guided approach using next-generation sequencing strategies to screen for actionable mutations defined through the ICGC effort.
    Journal of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Sciences 05/2013; 20(6). DOI:10.1007/s00534-013-0610-6 · 2.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Intrauterine nutrition can program metabolism, creating stable changes in physiology that may have significant health consequences. The mechanism underlying these changes is widely assumed to involve epigenetic changes to the expression of metabolic genes, but evidence supporting this idea is limited. Here we have performed the first study of the epigenomic consequences of exposure to maternal obesity and diabetes. We used a mouse model of natural-onset obesity that allows comparison of genetically identical mice whose mothers were either obese and diabetic or lean with a normal metabolism. We find that the offspring of obese mothers have a latent metabolic phenotype that is unmasked by exposure to a Western-style diet, resulting in glucose intolerance, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. The offspring show changes in hepatic gene expression and widespread but subtle alterations in cytosine methylation. Contrary to expectation, these molecular changes do not point to metabolic pathways but instead reside in broadly developmental ontologies. We propose that, rather than being adaptive, these changes may simply produce an inappropriate response to suboptimal environments; maladaptive phenotypes may be avoidable if postnatal nutrition is carefully controlled.
    Epigenetics: official journal of the DNA Methylation Society 04/2013; 8(6). DOI:10.4161/epi.24656 · 5.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSEIndividuals with adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater demonstrate a broad range of outcomes, presumably because these cancers may arise from any one of the three epithelia that converge at that location. This variability poses challenges for clinical decision making and the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PATIENTS AND METHODS We assessed the potential clinical utility of histomolecular phenotypes defined using a combination of histopathology and protein expression (CDX2 and MUC1) in 208 patients from three independent cohorts who underwent surgical resection for adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. RESULTS: one, patients with histomolecular nonpancreaticobiliary (intestinal) carcinoma without LN metastases who had an excellent prognosis; two, those with histomolecular pancreaticobiliary carcinoma with LN metastases who had a poor outcome; and three, the remainder of patients (nonpancreaticobiliary, LN positive or pancreaticobiliary, LN negative) who had an intermediate outcome. CONCLUSION Histopathologic and molecular criteria combine to define clinically relevant histomolecular phenotypes of adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater and potentially represent distinct diseases with significant implications for current therapeutic strategies, the ability to interpret past clinical trials, and future trial design.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 02/2013; DOI:10.1200/JCO.2012.46.8868 · 17.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The exocrine pancreas can undergo acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), as in the case of pancreatitis where precursor lesions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) can arise. The NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) has been implicated in carcinogenesis with dual roles depending on its subcellular localization. In this study, we examined the expression and the role of Sirt1 in different stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis, i.e. ADM models and established PDAC. In addition, we analyzed the expression of KIAA1967, a key mediator of Sirt1 function, along with potential Sirt1 downstream targets. Sirt1 was co-expressed with KIAA1967 in the nuclei of normal pancreatic acinar cells. In ADM, Sirt1 underwent a transient nuclear-to-cytoplasmic shuttling. Experiments where during ADM, we enforced repression of Sirt1 shuttling, inhibition of Sirt1 activity or modulation of its expression, all underscore that the temporary decrease of nuclear and increase of cytoplasmic Sirt1 stimulate ADM. Our results further underscore that important transcriptional regulators of acinar differentiation, that is, Pancreatic transcription factor-1a and beta-catenin can be deacetylated by Sirt1. Inhibition of Sirt1 is effective in suppression of ADM and in reducing cell viability in established PDAC tumors. KIAA1967 expression is differentially downregulated in PDAC and impacts on the sensitivity of PDAC cells to the Sirt1/2 inhibitor Tenovin-6. In PDAC, acetylation of beta-catenin is not affected, unlike p53, a well-characterized Sirt1-regulated protein in tumor cells. Our results reveal that Sirt1 is an important regulator and potential therapeutic target in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Cancer Res; 73(7); 2357-67. (C)2012 AACR.
    Cancer Research 01/2013; 73(7). DOI:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-3359 · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Somatic mutation calling from next-generation sequencing data remains a challenge due to the difficulties of distinguishing true somatic events from artifacts arising from PCR, sequencing errors or mis-mapping. Tumor cellularity or purity, sub-clonality and copy number changes also confound the identification of true somatic events against a background of germline variants. We have developed a heuristic strategy and software (http://www.qcmg.org/bioinformatics/qsnp/) for somatic mutation calling in samples with low tumor content and we show the superior sensitivity and precision of our approach using a previously sequenced cell line, a series of tumor/normal admixtures, and 3,253 putative somatic SNVs verified on an orthogonal platform.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(11):e74380. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0074380 · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Medical Oncology Group of Australia Scientific Meeting, Melbourne, Australia; 01/2013

Publication Stats

1k Citations
534.05 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2014
    • The Kinghorn Cancer Centre
      Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia
  • 2011–2014
    • Garvan Institute of Medical Research
      • Cancer Research Program
      Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia
  • 2013
    • Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital
      Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • 2007–2013
    • University of New South Wales
      • • St Vincent's Clinical School
      • • School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences (BABS)
      Kensington, New South Wales, Australia