Rishi Sud

Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

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Publications (5)8.76 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Background: Quality of life (QoL) is an important clinical and research outcome within the drug and alcohol abuse context. The AlQoL 9 is a specific questionnaire designed to assess health- and non-health-related consequences of alcoholism. The English version of the AlQoL 9 has not been validated using a larger sample. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of the English version of AlQoL 9 in a sample of treatment-seeking individuals in Australia. Methods: A sample of 138 participants from inpatient and outpatient treatments facilities completed the AlQoL 9 test and the World Health Organisation Quality of Life Assessment-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF). The study's investigative parameters included the demographic characteristics of the sample, internal structure, and convergent validity. Furthermore, correlations between the AlQoL 9 scale scores and the scores obtained from the WHOQOL-BREF test were investigated using Pearson product-moment correlation analyses. Results: The English version of the AlQoL 9 attained a significant Cronbach's alpha of 0.825. The mean score obtained in the test was 21.92 (SD = 6.79). Using Varimax rotation, the AlQoL 9 yielded one principal factor that had accounted for 37.85% of variance. Convergent validity analysis demonstrated significant correlations (p < 0.001) between the AlQoL 9 scores and the scores of all four dimensions of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the English version of the AlQoL 9 constitutes a valid and reliable research instrument for evaluating quality of life among alcohol-dependent individuals.
    The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 03/2014; 40(2):131-6. · 1.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study compares the diagnostic approach to pulmonary embolism (PE) in the study institution to well established guidelines. The study also re-examines the cost-benefit analyses of qualitative d-dimers and lung scans in the low Wells pre-test probability (PTP) group. A retrospective study of 169 consecutive CTPAs requested in the Emergency Department of a major teaching hospital during a 12 month period. The prevalence of PE was 0% (0/65), 11.7% (9/77), and 0% (0/2) in the low, moderate and high PTP groups respectively, and 6.3% (9/144) overall. PTP was only documented in 10 (6.9%) cases, and the qualitative D-dimer assay was only ordered in 33.8% (22/65) of low Wells PTP subjects. The false positive d-dimer rate was 90.2% (37/41). Cost-benefit analysis and assay performance defines a narrow range of low PTP PE prevalence between 1%-5% for the utilisation of the qualitative d-dimer assay. The overall prevalence of PE in subjects undergoing CTPA was significantly lower compared to data in the literature. The authors recommend warranted clinical suspicion of PE should be confirmed by a senior physician prior to placing a patient in the PE work-up pathway. In such patients, the qualitative d-dimer assay should be utilised if PTP is low, and the exclusionary efficiency of the d-dimer will be improved in the setting of higher PE prevalence in this subgroup. Hospitals should audit local PE prevalence, as cost-benefit analyses raises questions about the effectiveness of d-dimers when PE prevalence is very low in the low PTP subgroup.
    Internal Medicine Journal 06/2013; · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Health-Related Quality of Life for Drug Abusers (HRQoLDA) test was designed to specifically evaluate quality of life among substance users. In this study, the validity and reliability of the English version of the HRQoLDA test are reported for the first time. A sample of 121 participants from inpatient and outpatient treatment facilities completed the HRQoLDA test. The mean HRQoLDA score was 45.9 (SD = 16.9), while the overall Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.905. The factorial analysis of the HRQoLDA test revealed a unidimensional structure. Convergent validity analyses demonstrated significant correlations between the HRQoLDA test scores and the scores of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-Bref Questionnaire in different dimensions. The results revealed that the HRQoLDA was successfully adapted to English. The HRQoLDA is a reliable research instrument for evaluating quality of life of substance users.
    European Addiction Research 05/2012; 18(5):220-7. · 2.36 Impact Factor
  • Australian Journal of Primary Health 04/2012; · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The concept of quality of life relates to the perceptions of individuals about their mental and physical health as well as non-health related areas. The evaluation of quality of life in the context of substance abuse has been conducted using generic instruments. The Drug Users Quality of Life Scale (DUQOL) is a specific assessment tool in which the most pertinent and salient areas to drug abusers are taken into consideration. In this study, the authors report the results of a validation study in which the DUQOL was used for the first time in Australia. A sample of 120 participants from inpatient and outpatient treatment facilities completed a series of questionnaires, including the DUQOL and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF). Parameters investigated in this study included the demographic characteristics of the sample, internal structure, and convergent validity. Correlations between the DUQOL scale scores and the scores of the WHOQOL-Bref test were investigated via Pearson product-moment correlation analyses. The English version of the DUQOL attained a significant overall Cronbach's alpha of 0.868. The factorial analysis of the DUQOL identified one principal factor that accounted for 28.499% of the variance. Convergent validity analyses demonstrate significant correlations (p < 0.01) between the DUQOL scores and the scores of all four dimensions of the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. This study demonstrates that the DUQOL constitutes a reliable research instrument for evaluating quality of life of substance users in Australia.
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 03/2012; 10:31. · 2.27 Impact Factor