Ayaka Takashima

Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto Prefecture, Japan

Are you Ayaka Takashima?

Claim your profile

Publications (4)7.27 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Seijo-bofu-to, a traditional medicine used to treat acne in Asian countries, contains twelve herbal components, including Angelica dahurica root, a source of furanocoumarin derivatives. In this study, we investigated potential herb-drug interactions of seijo-bofu-to in healthy male volunteers. Thirty-two young, healthy, non-smoking males were assessed for the baseline activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, CYP3A, CYP2D6, N-acetyltransferase 2 and xanthine oxidase according to the urinary metabolic indices of 8-hr urine samples collected after the administration of a 150-mg dose of caffeine and a 30-mg dose of dextromethorphan, and the ratio of urinary excretion of 6β-hydroxycortisol to cortisol. Thereafter, the volunteers received 3.75 g of seijo-bofu-to twice daily for seven days and underwent the same tests on post-dose day 7. The geometric mean ratio of the CYP1A2 activity on day 7 to that observed at baseline was 0.66 (95% CI, 0.55─0.79, p = 0.001). The geometric mean phenotypic indices for CYP3A, CYP2D6, N-acetyltransferase 2 and xanthine oxidase on day 7 did not differ from the baseline values. The findings of the present study suggest that seijo-bofu-to may inhibit the activity of CYP1A2, whereas it is unlikely to participate in herb-drug interactions involving medications predominantly metabolized by CYP3A, CYP2D6, N-acetyltransferase 2 or xanthine oxidase. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology 02/2014; · 2.18 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many patients use herbal medicines to relieve menopausal symptoms. Keishi-bukuryo-gan contains five herbal components, and has been used for treating hypermenorrhoea, dysmenorrhoea and menopausal symptoms in Asian countries. In this study, we investigated the potential herb-drug interactions of keishi-bukuryo-gan in healthy female subjects.   Thirty-one healthy females (20-27 years) were studied to evaluate their baseline activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, CYP2D6, CYP3A, xanthine oxidase (XO) and N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) based on the urinary metabolic indices of an 8-h urine sample collected after a 150-mg dose of caffeine and a 30-mg dose of dextromethorphan, and also the urinary excretion ratio of 6β-hydroxycortisol to cortisol. Thereafter, the subjects received 3.75g of keishi-bukuryo-gan twice daily for seven days, and underwent the same tests on post-dose day 7. The geometric mean phenotypic index for CYP1A2 significantly decreased by 16% on day 7 compared with the baseline (P=0.026). Keishi-bukuryo-gan did not alter the indices for CYP2D6, CYP3A, XO and NAT2. Keishi-bukuryo-gan may inhibit the activity of CYP1A2, which is predominantly involved in oestrogen metabolism. However, TJ-25 is unlikely to participate in herb-drug interactions involving medications predominantly metabolized by CYP2D6, CYP3A, XO and NAT2. K
    The Journal of pharmacy and pharmacology. 05/2012; 64(5):670-6.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Although the interaction between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other drugs is important in the treatment of depression, there have been few studies of SSRIs concerning transporter-mediated interactions in humans. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of commonly used SSRIs on the pharmacokinetics of fexofenadine, a P-glycoprotein substrate.Twelve healthy volunteers (3 females and 9 males) were enrolled in this study. Each subject received a 60-mg dose of fexofenadine orally at baseline. Afterward, they were randomly assigned to receive 3 treatments with a 60-mg dose of fexofenadine after a 7-day treatment with fluvoxamine (50 mg/d), paroxetine (20 mg/d), or sertraline (50 mg/d), with 2-week intervals between the agents.Fluvoxamine pretreatment significantly increased the maximum plasma concentration, the area under the concentration time curves, and the 24-hour urinary fexofenadine excretion by 66% (P = 0.004), 78% (P = 0.029), and 78% (P < 0.001), respectively, without prolonging its elimination half-life. Paroxetine extended the elimination half-life of fexofenadine by 45% (P = 0.042), and it increased the 24-hour urinary fexofenadine excretion by 55% (P = 0.002). Sertraline did not alter any of the pharmacokinetic parameters of fexofenadine.This is the first report of the different effects of 3 commonly used SSRIs on fexofenadine pharmacokinetics in humans. Our 7-day, repeated-dose clinical study in healthy volunteers indicates that fluvoxamine and paroxetine, but not sertraline, may impact the patient exposure to fexofenadine, which is likely the result of P-glycoprotein inhibition in the small intestine and/or the liver.
    Journal of clinical psychopharmacology 04/2012; 32(2):195-9. · 5.09 Impact Factor
  • Epilepsy & Seizure 01/2010; 3(1):34-50.