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Publications (8)54.08 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Supplementary information available for this article at http://www.nature.com/icb/journal/vaop/ncurrent/suppinfo/icb201494s1.html
    Immunology and Cell Biology 11/2014; · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that has an important role at mucosal sites in a wide range of immune responses including infection, allergy and auto-immunity. γδ T cells are recognized as IL-17 producers, but based on the level of CD3 expression, we now define the remarkable ability of a CD3(bright) γδ T-cell subset with an effector memory phenotype to rapidly produce IL-17A, but not interferon-γ. CD3(bright) γδ T cells uniformly express the canonical germline encoded Vγ6/Vδ1(+) T-cell receptor. They are widely distributed with a preferential representation in the lungs and skin are negatively impacted in the absence of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor gammat expression or endogenous flora. This population responded rapidly to various stimuli in a mechanism involving IL-23 and NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-inflammasome-dependent IL-1β. Finally, we demonstrated that IL-17-producing CD3(bright) γδ T cells responded promptly and strongly to pneumococcal infection and during skin inflammation. Here, we propose a new way to specifically analyze IL-17-producing Vγ6/Vδ1(+) T cells based on the level of CD3 signals. Using this gating strategy, our data reinforce the crucial role of this γδ T-cell subset in respiratory and skin disorders.Immunology and Cell Biology advance online publication, 11 November 2014; doi:10.1038/icb.2014.94.
    Immunology and Cell Biology 11/2014; · 3.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The specific targeting of tumor-elicited immunosuppression is a promising strategy for the treatment of cancer. We have recently demonstrated that targeting the immunosuppressive pathway mediated by CD73-derived adenosine through the blockade of A2A/A2B adenosine receptors significantly reduced the metastatic potential of CD73(+) breast carcinomas and melanomas via both immunological and non-immunological mechanisms.
    Oncoimmunology. 12/2013; 2(12):e26705.
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    ABSTRACT: CD73 inhibits antitumor immunity through the activation of adenosine receptors expressed on multiple immune subsets. CD73 also enhances tumor metastasis, although the nature of the immune subsets and adenosine receptor subtypes involved in this process are largely unknown. In this study, we revealed that A2A/A2B receptor antagonists were effective in reducing the metastasis of tumors expressing CD73 endogenously (4T1.2 breast tumors) and when CD73 was ectopically expressed (B16F10 melanoma). A2A(-/-) mice were strongly protected against tumor metastasis, indicating that host A2A receptors enhanced tumor metastasis. A2A blockade enhanced natural killer (NK) cell maturation and cytotoxic function in vitro, reduced metastasis in a perforin-dependent manner, and enhanced NK cell expression of granzyme B in vivo, strongly suggesting that the antimetastatic effect of A2A blockade was due to enhanced NK cell function. Interestingly, A2B blockade had no effect on NK cell cytotoxicity, indicating that an NK cell-independent mechanism also contributed to the increased metastasis of CD73(+) tumors. Our results thus revealed that CD73 promotes tumor metastasis through multiple mechanisms, including suppression of NK cell function. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that A2A or A2B antagonists may be useful for the treatment of metastatic disease. Overall, our study has potential therapeutic implications given that A2A/A2B receptor antagonists have already entered clinical trials in other therapeutic settings.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 08/2013; · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the antitumor efficacy and toxicity of a novel combination approach involving adoptive T cell immunotherapy utilizing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells with an immunomodulatory reagent for blocking immunosuppression. We examined whether administration of a PD-1 blocking antibody could increase the therapeutic activity of CAR T cells against two different Her-2+ tumors. The use of a self-antigen mouse model enabled investigation into the efficacy, mechanism and toxicity of this combination approach. In this study we first demonstrated a significant increase in the level of PD-1 expressed on transduced anti-Her-2 CD8+ T cells following antigen-specific stimulation with PD-L1+ tumor cells and that markers of activation and proliferation were increased in anti-Her-2 T cells in the presence of anti-PD-1 antibody. In adoptive transfer studies in Her-2 transgenic recipient mice, we demonstrated a significant improvement in growth inhibition of two different Her-2+ tumors treated with anti-Her-2 T cells in combination with anti-PD-1 antibody. The therapeutic effects observed correlated with increased function of anti-Her-2 T cells following PD-1 blockade. Strikingly a significant decrease in the percentage of Gr1+ CD11b+ myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) was observed in the tumor microenvironment of mice treated with the combination therapy. Importantly, increased anti-tumor effects were not associated with any autoimmune pathology in normal tissue expressing Her-2 antigen. This study demonstrates that specifically blocking PD-1 immunosuppression can potently enhance CAR T cell therapy that has significant implications for potentially improving therapeutic outcomes of this approach in cancer patients.
    Clinical Cancer Research 07/2013; · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Using gene-expression data from over 6,000 breast cancer patients, we report herein that high CD73 expression is associated with a poor prognosis in triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). Because anthracycline-based chemotherapy regimens are standard treatment for TNBC, we investigated the relationship between CD73 and anthracycline efficacy. In TNBC patients treated with anthracycline-only preoperative chemotherapy, high CD73 gene expression was significantly associated with a lower rate of pathological complete response or the disappearance of invasive tumor at surgery. Using mouse models of breast cancer, we demonstrated that CD73 overexpression in tumor cells conferred chemoresistance to doxorubicin, a commonly used anthracycline, by suppressing adaptive antitumor immune responses via activation of A2A adenosine receptors. Targeted blockade of CD73 enhanced doxorubicin-mediated antitumor immune responses and significantly prolonged the survival of mice with established metastatic breast cancer. Taken together, our data suggest that CD73 constitutes a therapeutic target in TNBC.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 06/2013; · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tumors use several strategies to evade immunosurveillance. One such mechanism is the generation of adenosine within the tumor microenvironment, which potently suppresses antitumor T cell responses. Adenosine within the tumor is generated by CD73, a membrane-bound nucleotidase that is expressed by tumor cells, suppressive immune subsets such as T regulatory cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells and endothelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that targeted inhibition of CD73 has the potential to reduce tumorigenesis and metastasis, as well as enhancing the potency of T-cell-directed therapies. This review outlines the impact of adenosine on suppressing the antitumor response and the evidence supporting the rationale for CD73 targeting in the treatment of cancer.
    Trends in Immunology 04/2012; 33(5):231-7. · 9.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CD73 is a cell surface 5'-nucleotidase that converts AMP to adenosine, an immune suppressive molecule. CD73 may promote immune escape in cancer by contributing to the degradation of extracellular ATP released by dying cancer cells in hypoxic tumors or following chemotherapy. However, whether CD73 exerts a critical oncogenic function during tumorigenesis is unknown. In this study, we used genetically deficient mice to investigate its contribution to autochthonous tumor formation. CD73 deficiency suppressed the development of 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced fibrosarcomas through a mechanism relying upon IFN-γ, natural killer (NK) cells, and CD8(+) T cells. Similarly, CD73 deficiency also suppressed prostate tumorigenesis in TRAMP transgenic mice. Importantly, treatment with an anti-CD73 monoclonal antibody effectively suppressed growth of established MCA-induced tumors or TRAMP-C1 prostate tumors and inhibited the development of TRAMP-C1 lung metastases. The therapeutic activity of anti-CD73 monoclonal antibody against primary tumors was dependent on CD8(+) T cells, whereas its antimetastatic activity was dependent on host CD73 expression independent of T cells or NK cells. Taken together, our findings indicate that CD73 is a critical factor in tumorigenesis and that anti-CD73 antibodies may offer a novel generalized strategy to blunt immune escape and treat cancer.
    Cancer Research 03/2012; 72(9):2190-6. · 9.28 Impact Factor