Young Hoon Seo

Konyang University Hospital, Gaigeturi, Jeju, South Korea

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Publications (5)6.18 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: It is unclear which plaque component is related with long-term clinical outcomes in patients with coronary artery occlusive disease (CAOD). We assessed the relationship between plaque compositions and long-term clinical outcomes in those patients. The study subjects consisted of 339 consecutive patients (mean 61.7±12.2 years old, 239 males) who underwent coronary angiogram and a virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound examination. Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE), including all-cause death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular events, and target vessel revascularization were evaluated during a mean 28-month follow-up period. Patients with high fibrofatty volume (FFV, >8.90 mm(3), n=169) had a higher incidence of MACCE (25.4% vs. 14.7%, p=0.015), male sex (75.7% vs. 65.3%, p=0.043), acute coronary syndrome (53.3% vs. 35.9%, p=0.002), multivessel disease (62.7% vs. 41.8%, p<0.001) and post-stent slow flow (10.7% vs. 2.4%, p=0.002) than those with low FFV (FFV≤8.90 mm(3), n=170). Other plaque composition factors such as fibrous area/volume, dense calcified area/volume, and necrotic core area/volume did not show any impact on MACCE. Cardiogenic shock {hazard ratio (HR)=8.44; 95% confidence interval (CI)=3.00-23.79; p<0.001} and FFV (HR=1.85; 95% CI=1.12-3.07; p=0.016) were the independent predictors of MACCE by Cox regression analysis. Thin-cap fibroatheroma, necrotic core area, and necrotic core volume were not associated with MACCE. FFV of a culprit lesion was associated with unfavorable long-term clinical outcomes in patients with CAOD.
    Korean Circulation Journal 06/2013; 43(6):377-83.
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    ABSTRACT: Hypercholesterolemia is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. We sought to evaluate the relation between hypercholesterolemia and plaque composition in patients with coronary artery disease. Study subjects consisted of 323 patients (mean 61.5 years, 226 males) who underwent coronary angiography and virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound examination. Patients were divided into two groups according to total cholesterol level: hypercholesterolemic group (≥200 mg/dL, n=114) and normocholesterolemic group (<200 mg/dL, n=209). Hypercholesterolemic patients were younger (59.7±13.3 years vs. 62.6±11.5 years, p=0.036), than normocholesterolemic patients, whereas there were no significant differences in other demographics. Hypercholesterolemic patients had higher corrected necrotic core volume (1.23±0.85 mm(3)/mm vs. 1.02±0.80 mm(3)/mm, p=0.029) as well as percent necrotic core volume (20.5±8.5% vs. 18.0±9.2%, p=0.016) than normocholesterolemic patients. At the minimal lumen area site, percent necrotic core area (21.4±10.5% vs. 18.4±11.3%, p=0.019) and necrotic core area (1.63±1.09 mm(2) vs. 1.40±1.20 mm(2), p=0.088) were also higher than normocholesterolemic patients. Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that total cholesterol level was an independent factor of percent necrotic core volume in the culprit lesion after being adjusted with age, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol , hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking and acute coronary syndrome (beta 0.027, 95% confidence interval 0.02-0.053, p=0.037). Hypercholesterolemia was associated with increased necrotic core volume in coronary artery plaque. This study suggests that hypercholesterolemia plays a role in making plaque more complex, which is characterized by a large necrotic core, in coronary artery disease.
    Korean Circulation Journal 01/2013; 43(1):23-8.
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between the positive remodeling (PR) of a coronary artery and plaque composition has been studied only in a relatively small number of study population or non-culprit lesion. We evaluated the association between coronary plaque composition and coronary artery remodeling in a relatively large number of culprit lesions. The study population consisted of 325 consecutive patients with coronary artery disease that underwent intravascular ultrasound-virtual histology examination in a culprit lesion. The remodeling index (RI) was calculated as the lesion external elastic membrane (EEM) area divided by the average reference EEM area. The lesions with PR (RI>1.05, n=97, mean RI=1.19±0.12) had a higher fibrous volume/lesion length (3.85±2.12 mm(3)/mm vs. 3.04±1.79 mm(3)/mm, p=0.003) and necrotic core volume/lesion length (1.26±0.89 mm(3)/mm vs. 0.90±0.66 mm(3)/mm, p=0.001) than those with negative remodeling (NR) (RI<0.95, n=132, mean RI=0.82±0.09). At the minimal luminal area site, the lesions with PR had a higher fibrous area (5.81±3.17 mm(2) vs. 3.61±2.30 mm(2), p<0.001), dense calcified area (0.73±0.69 mm(2) vs. 0.46±0.43 mm(2), p=0.001), and necrotic core area (1.93±1.33 mm(2) vs. 1.06±0.91 mm(2), p<0.001) than those with NR. RI showed significant positive correlation with fibrous volume/lesion length (r=0.173, p=0.002), necrotic core volume/lesion length (r=0.188, p=0.001), fibrous area (r=0.347, p<0.001), fibrofatty area (r=0.111, p=0.036), dense calcified area (r=0.239, p<0.001), and necrotic core area (r=0.334, p<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the independent factor for PR was the necrotic core volume/lesion length (beta=0.130, 95% confidence interval; 0.002-0.056, p=0.037) over the entire lesion. This study suggests that PR in a culprit lesion is associated with the necrotic core volume in the entire lesion, which is a characteristic of vulnerable plaque.
    Korean Circulation Journal 11/2012; 42(11):747-52.
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We evaluated discrepancy of calcium detection between gray scale intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and virtual histology (VH)-IVUS and the association between coronary calcium and plaque composition. METHODS: Study population consisted of 162 consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with VH-IVUS study. Subjects were divided into 3 groups based on gray scale IVUS findings; No calcification group (n=50), spotty group (n=56) who had a lesion containing only small calcium deposits within an arc <90° and diffuse group (n=56) who had a diffuse calcified lesion with an arc ≥90° in ≥1 cross-sectional image of the lesion. RESULTS: No calcification group was younger than spotty and diffuse groups (54.4±13.0years vs. 61.1±10.7years and 64.2±9.9years, p=0.011 and p<0.001, respectively). No calcification group had some degree of dense calcium (5. 7±6.9mm(3)) by VH-IVUS analysis. Furthermore, calcified volume by VH-IVUS in no calcification group was similar to those in spotty group (5.7±6.9mm(3) vs. 5.4±4.4mm(3)). Dense calcium volume was correlated directly with plaque volume (r=0.65, p<0.001), fibrous volume (r=0.54, p<0.001), fibro-fatty volume (r=0.29, p<0.001) and lipid core volume (r=0.77, p<0.001). In multiple regression analysis, lipid core volume (β=0.287, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.187-0.388, p<0.001) was an independent predictor of dense calcium volume. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that coronary calcium can be present even if invisible in gray scale IVUS and associated with lipid core volume, which is a characteristic of plaque vulnerability.
    International journal of cardiology 07/2012; · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We evaluated which plaque components are associated with long-term clinical events in patients who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The study subjects consisted of 57 consecutive patients (mean age, 58.5±14.5 years; 45 males) who underwent primary PCI and a virtual histology-intravascular ultrasound examination. Major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) including death, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and revascularization were evaluated during the mean 28 month follow-up period. Patients with high fibro-fatty volume (FFV >13.4 mm(3), n=29; mean age, 61.3 years) had a lower ejection fraction (52.7% vs. 59.4%, p=0.022), a higher incidence of multi-vessel disease (69.0% vs. 28.6%, p=0.002), larger plaque area (25.7 mm(2) vs. 15.9 mm(2), p<0.001), and larger plaque volume (315 mm(3) vs. 142 mm(3), p<0.001) than those with a low FFV (≤13.4 mm(3), n=28; mean age, 55.6 years). Patients with high FFV had a significantly higher incidence (32.1% vs. 8.3%, p=0.036) of MACE than those with low FFV. When we divided the study population according to the necrotic core volume (NCV), fibrous volume, or dense calcified volume, no significant findings in terms of demographics and MACE rates were observed. A Cox regression analysis revealed that the independent factor for MACE was FFV (hazard ratio, 6.748; 95% confidence interval, 1.168-38.971, p=0.033) in this study population. The coronary plaque component, particularly FFV, but not NCV, was important in long-term clinical outcomes in patients who underwent primary PCI.
    Korean Circulation Journal 01/2012; 42(1):33-9.