Bruce A Barshop

University of California, San Diego, San Diego, California, United States

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Publications (78)368.12 Total impact

  • Ilya Gertsman, Jon A. Gangoiti, Bruce A. Barshop
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    ABSTRACT: Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics is a rapidly growing field in both research and diagnosis. Generally, the methodologies and types of instruments used for clinical and other absolute quantification experiments are different from those used for biomarkers discovery and untargeted analysis, as the former requires optimal sensitivity and dynamic range, while the latter requires high resolution and high mass accuracy. We used a Q-TOF mass spectrometer with two different types of pentafluorophenyl (PFP) stationary phases, employing both positive and negative ionization, to develop and validate a hybrid quantification and discovery platform using LC–HRMS. This dual-PFP LC–MS platform quantifies over 50 clinically relevant metabolites in serum (using both MS and MS/MS acquisitions) while simultaneously collecting high resolution and high mass accuracy full scans to monitor all other co-eluting non-targeted analytes. We demonstrate that the linearity, accuracy, and precision results for the quantification of a number of metabolites, including amino acids, organic acids, acylcarnitines and purines/pyrimidines, meets or exceeds normal bioanalytical standards over their respective physiological ranges. The chromatography resolved highly polar as well as hydrophobic analytes under reverse-phase conditions, enabling analysis of a wide range of chemicals, necessary for untargeted metabolomics experiments. Though previous LC–HRMS methods have demonstrated quantification capabilities for various drug and small molecule compounds, the present study provides an HRMS quant/qual platform tailored to metabolic disease; and covers a multitude of different metabolites including compounds normally quantified by a combination of separate instrumentation.
    Metabolomics 04/2014; 10(2). · 4.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) is a fatty acid oxidation disorder with widely varying presentations that has presented a significant challenge to newborn screening (NBS). The Western States Regional Genetics Services Collaborative developed a workgroup to study infants with NBS positive for VLCADD. We performed retrospective analysis of newborns with elevated C14:1-acylcarnitine on NBS in California, Oregon, Washington, and Hawai'i including available confirmatory testing and clinical information. Overall, from 2,802,504 children screened, there were 242 cases screen-positive for VLCADD. There were 34 symptomatic true positive cases, 18 asymptomatic true positives, 112 false positives, 55 heterozygotes, 11 lost to follow-up, and 12 other disorders. One in 11,581 newborns had an abnormal NBS for suspected VLCADD. Comparison of analytes and analyte ratios from the NBS demonstrated statistically significant differences between true positive and false positive groups for C14:1, C14, C14:1/C2, and C14:1/C16. The positive predictive value for all true positive cases was 94%, 54%, and 23% when C14:1 was ≥2.0μM, ≥1.0μM, and ≥0.7μM, respectively. Sequential post-analytical analysis could reduce the referral rate in 25.8% of cases. This study is the largest reported follow-up of infants with NBS screen-positive results for suspected VLCADD and demonstrates the necessity of developing comprehensive and consistent long-term follow-up NBS systems. Application of clinical information revealed differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic children with VLCADD. Comparison of NBS analytes and analyte ratios may be valuable in developing more effective diagnostic algorithms.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 01/2014; · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We collected data on 48 patients from 38 families with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency. Global developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID) with speech/language delay and behavioral problems as the most affected domains was present in 44 participants, with additional epilepsy present in 35 and movement disorder in 13. Treatment regimens included various combinations/dosages of creatine-monohydrate, l-ornithine, sodium benzoate and protein/arginine restricted diets. The median age at treatment initiation was 25.5 and 39months in patients with mild and moderate DD/ID, respectively, and 11years in patients with severe DD/ID. Increase of cerebral creatine and decrease of plasma/CSF guanidinoacetate levels were achieved by supplementation with creatine-monohydrate combined with high dosages of l-ornithine and/or an arginine-restricted diet (250mg/kg/d l-arginine). Therapy was associated with improvement or stabilization of symptoms in all of the symptomatic cases. The 4 patients treated younger than 9months had normal or almost normal developmental outcomes. One with inconsistent compliance had a borderline IQ at age 8.6years. An observational GAMT database will be essential to identify the best treatment to reduce plasma guanidinoacetate levels and improve long-term outcomes.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 11/2013; · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The advent of model-enabled workflows in systems biology allows for the integration of experimental data types with genome-scale models to discover new features of biology. This work demonstrates such a workflow, aimed at establishing a metabolomics platform applied to study the differences in metabolomes between anaerobic and aerobic growth of Escherichia coli. Constraint-based modeling was utilized to deduce a target list of compounds for downstream method development. An analytical and experimental methodology was developed and tailored to the compound chemistry and growth conditions of interest. This included the construction of a rapid sampling apparatus for use with anaerobic cultures. The resulting genome-scale data sets for anaerobic and aerobic growth were validated by comparison to previous small-scale studies comparing growth of E. coli under the same conditions. The metabolomics data were then integrated with the E. coli genome-scale metabolic model (GEM) via a sensitivity analysis that utilized reaction thermodynamics to reconcile simulated growth rates and reaction directionalities. This analysis highlighted several optimal network usage inconsistencies, including the incorrect use of the beta-oxidation pathway for synthesis of fatty acids. This analysis also identified enzyme promiscuity for the pykA gene, that is critical for anaerobic growth, and which has not been previously incorporated into metabolic models of E coli. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2013;9999: 1-13. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Biotechnology and Bioengineering 10/2013; · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Therapy to slow the relentless expansion of interstitial extracellular matrix that leads to renal functional decline in patients with CKD is currently lacking. Because chronic kidney injury increases tissue oxidative stress, we evaluated the antifibrotic efficacy of cysteamine bitartrate, an antioxidant therapy for patients with nephropathic cystinosis, in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Fresh cysteamine (600 mg/kg) was added to drinking water daily beginning on the day of surgery, and outcomes were assessed on days 7, 14, and 21 after surgery. Plasma cysteamine levels showed diurnal variation, with peak levels similar to those observed in patients with cystinosis. In cysteamine-treated mice, fibrosis severity decreased significantly at 14 and 21 days after unilateral ureteral obstruction, and renal oxidized protein levels decreased at each time point, suggesting reduced oxidative stress. Consistent with these results, treatment of cultured macrophages with cysteamine reduced cellular generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, treatment with cysteamine reduced α-smooth muscle actin-positive interstitial myofibroblast proliferation and mRNA levels of extracellular matrix proteins in mice and attenuated myofibroblast differentiation and proliferation in vitro, but did not augment TGF-β signaling. In a study of renal ischemia reperfusion, cysteamine therapy initiated 10 days after injury and continued for 14 days decreased renal fibrosis by 40%. Taken together, these data suggest previously unrecognized antifibrotic actions of cysteamine via TGF-β-independent mechanisms that include oxidative stress reduction and attenuation of the myofibroblast response to kidney injury and support further investigation into the potential benefit of cysteamine therapy in the treatment of CKD.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 09/2013; · 8.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of ESRD, but few biomarkers of diabetic kidney disease are available. This study used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to quantify 94 urine metabolites in screening and validation cohorts of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and CKD(DM+CKD), in patients with DM without CKD (DM-CKD), and in healthy controls. Compared with levels in healthy controls, 13 metabolites were significantly reduced in the DM+CKD cohorts (P≤0.001), and 12 of the 13 remained significant when compared with the DM-CKD cohort. Many of the differentially expressed metabolites were water-soluble organic anions. Notably, organic anion transporter-1 (OAT1) knockout mice expressed a similar pattern of reduced levels of urinary organic acids, and human kidney tissue from patients with diabetic nephropathy demonstrated lower gene expression of OAT1 and OAT3. Analysis of bioinformatics data indicated that 12 of the 13 differentially expressed metabolites are linked to mitochondrial metabolism and suggested global suppression of mitochondrial activity in diabetic kidney disease. Supporting this analysis, human diabetic kidney sections expressed less mitochondrial protein, urine exosomes from patients with diabetes and CKD had less mitochondrial DNA, and kidney tissues from patients with diabetic kidney disease had lower gene expression of PGC1α (a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis). We conclude that urine metabolomics is a reliable source for biomarkers of diabetic complications, and our data suggest that renal organic ion transport and mitochondrial function are dysregulated in diabetic kidney disease.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 08/2013; · 8.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose:Globotriaosylceramide concentrations were assessed as potential predictors of change from baseline after 12 months by estimated glomerular filtration rate and left-ventricular mass index using pooled data from three randomized, placebo-controlled agalsidase alfa trials and open-label extensions of patients with Fabry disease.Methods:Males (aged 18 years or older) with Fabry disease received agalsidase alfa (0.2 mg/kg every other week for 12 months). A backward-elimination approach evaluated potential predictors (baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate and left-ventricular mass index; age at first dose; baseline and change from baseline at 12 months of globotriaosylceramide (urine, plasma); urine protein excretion; and systolic and diastolic blood pressure). Subgroups included patients randomized to placebo or agalsidase alfa (double-blind phase), then to agalsidase alfa (open-label extensions; placebo→agalsidase alfa or agalsidase alfa→agalsidase alfa, respectively) and stage 2/3 chronic kidney disease patients.Results:Baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate, age at first dose, baseline urine globotriaosylceramide excretion, and baseline and change from baseline urine protein excretion significantly predicted change from baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate in the analysis population (N = 73; all P<0.05), although not in all subgroups. Change from baseline urine and plasma globotriaosylceramide (baseline and change from baseline) concentrations did not predict change from baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate. No predictors of left-ventricular mass index were significant.Conclusion:Changes in globotriaosylceramide concentrations do not appear to be useful biomarkers for prediction of Fabry disease-related changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate or left-ventricular mass index.Genet Med advance online publication 16 May 2013Genetics in Medicine (2013); doi:10.1038/gim.2013.56.
    Genetics in medicine: official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics 05/2013; · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase (GAMT) deficiency is a good candidate disorder for newborn screening because early treatment appears to improve outcomes. We report elevation of guanidinoacetate in archived newborn dried blood spots for 3 cases (2 families) of GAMT deficiency compared with an unaffected carrier and controls. We also report a new case of a patient treated from birth with normal developmental outcome at the age of 42months.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 03/2013; · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cysteamine is approved for the treatment of cystinosis and is being evaluated for Huntington's disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Little is known about the bioavailability and biodistribution of the drug. The aim was to determine plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and tissue (liver, kidney, muscle) cysteamine levels following intraduodenal delivery of the drug in rats pretreated and naïve to cysteamine and to estimate the hepatic first-pass effect on cysteamine. Healthy male rats (n = 66) underwent intraduodenal and portal (PV) or jugular (JVC) venous catheterization. Half were pretreated with cysteamine, and half were naïve. Following intraduodenal cysteamine (20 mg/kg), serial blood samples were collected from the PV or the JVC. Animals were sacrificed at specific time points, and CSF and tissue were collected. Cysteamine levels were determined in plasma, CSF, and tissue. The C(max) was achieved in 5-10 min from PV and 5-22.5 min from JVC. The PV-C(max) (P = 0.08), PV-AUC(0-t) (P = 0.16), JVC-C(max) (P = 0.02) and JVC-AUC(0-t) (P = 0.03) were higher in naive than in pretreated animals. Plasma cysteamine levels returned to baseline in ≤120 min. The hepatic first-pass effect was estimated at 40%. Peak tissue and CSF cysteamine levels occurred ≤22.5 min, but returned to baseline levels ≤180 min. There was no difference in CSF and tissue cysteamine levels between naïve and pretreated groups, although cysteamine was more rapidly cleared in the pretreated group. Cysteamine is rapidly absorbed from the small intestine, undergoes significant hepatic first-pass metabolism, crosses the blood brain barrier, and is almost undetectable in plasma, CSF, and body tissues 2 h after ingestion. Sustained-release cysteamine may provide prolonged tissue exposure.
    Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology 10/2012; · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation with highly variable biochemical, genetic, and clinical characteristics. SCADD has been associated with accumulation of butyryl-CoA byproducts, including butyrylcarnitine (C4), butyrylglycine, ethylmalonic acid (EMA), and methylsuccinic acid (MS) in body fluid and tissues. Differences in genotype frequencies have been shown between patients diagnosed clinically versus those diagnosed by newborn screening. Moreover, while patients diagnosed clinically have a variable clinical presentation including developmental delay, ketotic hypoglycemia, epilepsy and behavioral disorders, studies suggest patients diagnosed by newborn screening are largely asymptomatic. Scant information is published about the biochemical, genetic and clinical outcome of SCADD patients diagnosed by newborn screening. We collected California newborn screening, follow-up biochemical levels, and ACADS mutation data from September, 2005 through April, 2010. We retrospectively reviewed available data on SCADD cases diagnosed by newborn screening for clinical outcomes. During the study period, 2,632,058 newborns were screened and 76 confirmed SCADD cases were identified. No correlations between initial C4 value and follow-up biochemical markers (C4, EMA or MS levels) were found in the 76 cases studied. We found significant correlation between urine EMA versus MS, and correlation between follow-up C4 versus urine EMA. Of 22 cases where ACADS gene sequencing was performed: 7 had two or more deleterious mutations; 8 were compound heterozygotes for a deleterious mutation and common variant; 7 were homozygous for the common variant c.625G>A; and 1 was heterozygous for c.625G>A. Significant increases in mean urine EMA and MS levels were noted in patients with two or more deleterious mutations versus mutation heterozygotes or common polymorphism homozygotes. Clinical outcome data was available in 31 patients with follow-up extending from 0.5 to 60 months. None developed epilepsy or behavioral disorders, and three patients had isolated speech delay. Hypoglycemia occurred in two patients, both in the neonatal period. The first patient had concomitant meconium aspiration; the other presented with central apnea, poor feeding, and hypotonia. The latter, a c.625G>A homozygote, has had persistent elevations in both short- and medium-chain acylcarnitines; diagnostic workup in this case is extensive and ongoing. This study examines the largest series to date of SCADD patients identified by newborn screening. Our results suggest that confirmatory tests may be useful to differentiate patients with common variants from those with deleterious mutations. This study also provides evidence to suggest that, even when associated with deleterious mutations, SCADD diagnosed by newborn screening presents largely as a benign condition.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 02/2012; 106(1):55-61. · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We used exome sequencing to identify the genetic basis of combined malonic and methylmalonic aciduria (CMAMMA). We sequenced the exome of an individual with CMAMMA and followed up with sequencing of eight additional affected individuals (cases). This included one individual who was identified and diagnosed by searching an exome database. We identify mutations in ACSF3, encoding a putative methylmalonyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA synthetase as a cause of CMAMMA. We also examined a canine model of CMAMMA, which showed pathogenic mutations in a predicted ACSF3 ortholog. ACSF3 mutant alleles occur with a minor allele frequency of 0.0058 in ∼1,000 control individuals, predicting a CMAMMA population incidence of ∼1:30,000. ACSF3 deficiency is the first human disorder identified as caused by mutations in a gene encoding a member of the acyl-CoA synthetase family, a diverse group of evolutionarily conserved proteins, and may emerge as one of the more common human metabolic disorders.
    Nature Genetics 08/2011; 43(9):883-6. · 35.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a 45-year-old patient who was diagnosed with propionic acidemia in infancy, who experienced an unstable first two years of life but who eventually had a good developmental outcome. She developed severe renal failure requiring renal transplantation in her forties and premature ovarian failure. Renal failure and premature ovarian failure have not previously been associated with propionic acidemia. We hypothesize that propionic acidemia may have contributed to these complications, and discuss several possible mechanisms for this, emphasizing mainly the electron transport chain/mitochondrial energy deficiency hypothesis.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 04/2011; 103(4):338-40. · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Methylcrotonylglycinuria (MCG) is an inborn error of leucine catabolism and has a recessive pattern of inheritance that results from the deficiency of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC). The clinical phenotypes are highly variable ranging from neonatal onset with severe neurological involvement to asymptomatic adults. Here we identified two novel MCCA (exon 3: c.137G>A; p.46G>E), (IVS7-1G>A splice site mutation), and four novel MCCB (exon 11: c.1065A>T; p.355L>F), (exon 15: c.1430A>G; p.477Q>R), (exon 16: c.1549G>A; p.517G>R), (exon 16: c.1559A>C; p.520Y>S) mutant alleles from five MCC-deficient patients.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 10/2010; 102(2):218-21. · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cysteamine bitartrate is taken lifelong, every 6 h and for the treatment of cystinosis. Recent studies using cysteamine for for other diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders adopt the same dosing regimen for cysteamine. Regular cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon) may cause upper gastrointestinal symptoms in some patients. This is the only study that provides pharmacokinetic data for cysteamine delivered in an enteric-release preparation in normal subjects. EC-cysteamine is very well tolerated and does not cause increased gastrin concentrations, even at relatively high doses. EC-cysteamine at the higher dose results in better drug uptake as measured by Cmax and AUC and is more likely to be effective. Cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon) is the approved treatment for cystinosis. Poor compliance and patient outcome may occur because the drug needs to be taken every 6 h and in some patients causes gastrointestinal symptoms due to hypergastrinaemia. A formulation of cysteamine requiring twice daily ingestion would improve the quality of life for these patients. This study compares the pharmacokinetics and gastrin production following cysteamine bitartrate non-enteric-coated and cysteamine bitartrate enteric-coated in normal healthy subjects. Enteric-coated cysteamine was prepared. Following single doses of cysteamine bitartrate non-enteric-coated 450 mg and cysteamine bitartrate enteric-coated 450 mg and 900 mg, serial plasma cysteamine and gastrin concentrations were measured. Two subjects also received cysteamine bitartrate non-enteric-coated 900 mg. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms were recorded. Six healthy adults (mean age 20.7 years, range 18-24 years; mean weight 59.3 kg) received drug. All post-dose gastrin concentrations were within the normal range (<100 pg ml(-1)). The tmax following cysteamine bitartrate non-enteric-coated (mean and SD is 75+/-19 min) was shorter than cysteamine bitartrate enteric-coated (220+/-74 min) (P=0.001), but only the Cmax and AUC estimates following 900 mg cysteamine bitartrate enteric-coated were significantly greater than any of the other preparations or doses (P<0.05). One patient had GI symptoms following both 900 mg cysteamine bitartrate non-enteric-coated and cysteamine bitartrate enteric-coated. Although patient numbers were low, single high doses of cysteamine bitartrate enteric-coated were better tolerated than similar doses of cysteamine bitartrate non-enteric-coated in the healthy subjects and all had normal gastrin concentrations. The delayed tmax following cysteamine bitartrate enteric-coated suggested that the cysteamine was released enterically.
    British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 09/2010; 70(3):376-82. · 3.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cystinosis causes renal and other organ failure. Treatment with 6-hourly cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon, Mylan, Morgantown, West Virginia) reduces intracellular cystine and the rate of organ deterioration. A recent study showed that an enteric-release cysteamine required less frequent daily dosing. This report describes the long-term use of enteric-coated (EC) cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon) in children with cystinosis. After a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of EC-cysteamine in children with cystinosis, 5 patients remained on twice-daily treatment. White blood cell cystine levels were measured 12 hours after ingestion every 4 to 8 weeks. These levels were then compared with the patient's previous 6-h post-dose levels taken while on regular cysteamine bitartrate before entering the study. Blood chemistry was also measured. Five children with cystinosis (mean age, 9 years; range, 8 to 17 years) who previously took cysteamine bitartrate (mean dose, 47 mg/kg body wt), received EC-cysteamine for 10 to 27 months (mean dose, 25 mg/kg body wt) and had mean white blood cell cystine levels of 0.77 and 0.71 nmol half-cystine/mg protein, respectively. During the study period, patients maintained adequate growth and there was no significant deterioration in renal or thyroid function. Two children were required to restart acid suppression after 6 months on EC-cysteamine therapy. Long-term, twice-daily EC-cysteamine, given at approximately 60% of the previous daily dose of cysteamine bitartrate, was effective at maintaining white blood cell cystine levels within a satisfactory range. There was no significant deterioration in renal or thyroid function.
    The Journal of pediatrics 02/2010; 156(5):823-7. · 4.02 Impact Factor
  • N Vivatrat, B A Barshop, K L Jones
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 11/2009; 149A(11):2557-9. · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cystinosis causes renal and other organ failure. Regular 6-hourly cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon; Mylan, Morgantown, West Virginia) reduces intracellular cystine and the rate of organ deterioration. A formulation of cysteamine requiring less frequent dosing may improve compliance and possibly patient outcome. Enteric-release cysteamine was prepared. For a period of 1 month, patients received their regular cysteamine dose every 6 hours (stage I). The patients then underwent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies following washout periods using single-doses of cysteamine and enteric-release cysteamine (stage II). Finally, the patients commenced regular enteric-release cysteamine therapy (stage III). Weekly trough white blood cell (WBC) cystine levels were recorded. Seven children with cystinosis (mean age, 11.8 years; range, 8-17 years) who received cysteamine and enteric-release cysteamine (mean dose, 45 and 28.8 mg/kg body weight/day, respectively) had mean WBC cystine levels of 0.7+/-0.3 and 0.41+/-0.22 nmol half-cystine/mg protein in study stages I and III, respectively. Study stage II showed that the mean time (T(max)) to reach the maximum plasma cysteamine level (C(max)) was longer for enteric-release cysteamine than for cysteamine (176 minutes vs 60 minutes; P=.001), but the mean C(max) at the same dose was similar. Mean serum gastrin levels were similar after ingestion of cysteamine and enteric-release cysteamine. Twelve-hour enteric-release cysteamine, given at approximately 60% of the previous daily dose of cysteamine, was effective in maintaining trough WBC cystine levels within a satisfactory range.
    The Journal of pediatrics 09/2009; 156(1):71-75.e1-3. · 4.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In male patients with Fabry disease, an X-linked disorder of glycosphingolipid metabolism caused by deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A, kidney dysfunction becomes apparent by the third decade of life and invariably progresses to ESRD without treatment. Here, we summarize the effects of agalsidase alfa on kidney function from three prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trials and their open-label extension studies involving 108 adult male patients. The mean baseline GFR among 54 nonhyperfiltrating patients (measured GFR <135 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) treated with placebo was 85.4 +/- 29.6 ml/min per 1.73 m(2); during 6 mo of placebo, the mean annualized rate of change in GFR was -7.0 +/- 32.9 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Among 85 nonhyperfiltrating patients treated with agalsidase alfa, the annualized rate of change was -2.9 +/- 8.7 ml/min per 1.73 m(2). Treatment with agalsidase alfa did not affect proteinuria. Multivariate analysis revealed that GFR and proteinuria category (< 1 or > or = 1 g/d) at baseline significantly predicted the rate of decline of GFR during treatment. This summary represents the largest group of male patients who had Fabry disease and for whom the effects of enzyme replacement therapy on kidney function have been studied. These data suggest that agalsidase alfa may stabilize kidney function in these patients.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 05/2009; 20(5):1132-9. · 8.99 Impact Factor
  • W L Nyhan, M Willis, B A Barshop, J Gangoiti
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    ABSTRACT: Expanded programmes of newborn screening permit early diagnosis in time to prevent serious complications. These programmes have begun to detect patients who might otherwise remain asymptomatic. An additional confounding variable is the positive screen that results from maternal rather than neonatal disease. This was the case in an infant in whom elevated hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine (C(5)OH) in his newborn screen was the result of placental transfer from his mother, whose holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency was being successfully treated with biotin. The mother had been diagnosed and treated with biotin prenatally. She had no phenotypic feature of holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency, most importantly no episodes ever of acute metabolic acidosis. In the infant a repeat screen was also positive. On day 28 the infant's plasma C(5)OH carnitine was 0.05 mumol/L (normal) and urinary organic acids on day 39 were normal. The mother's excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid was 109 mmol/mol creatinine. These observations indicate that holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency is one more maternal metabolic disease which may lead to a positive screen in her unaffected newborn infant. They also make the point that holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency in an infant should be detectable in programmes of neonatal screening, which was not clear previously.
    Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease 05/2009; · 4.07 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
368.12 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1990–2014
    • University of California, San Diego
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Pathology
      San Diego, California, United States
  • 2008–2009
    • Rady Children's Hospital
      San Diego, California, United States
  • 2001
    • University of Massachusetts Amherst
      Amherst Center, Massachusetts, United States
    • University of Valencia
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
  • 2000
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Seattle, WA, United States