Kishanda Vyboh

Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (2)7.69 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 is caused by the expansion of the coding CAG repeat in the ATXN3 gene. Interestingly, a -1 bp frameshift occurring within an (exp)CAG repeat would henceforth lead to translation from a GCA frame, generating polyalanine stretches instead of polyglutamine. Our results show that transgenic expression of (exp)CAG ATXN3 led to -1 frameshifting events, which have deleterious effects in Drosophila and mammalian neurons. Conversely, transgenic expression of polyglutamine-encoding (exp)CAA ATXN3 was not toxic. Furthermore, (exp)CAG ATXN3 mRNA does not contribute per se to the toxicity observed in our models. Our observations indicate that expanded polyglutamine tracts in Drosophila and mouse neurons are insufficient for the development of a phenotype. Hence, we propose that -1 ribosomal frameshifting contributes to the toxicity associated with (exp)CAG repeats.
    Human Molecular Genetics 02/2012; 21(10):2211-8. · 7.69 Impact Factor
  • Kishanda Vyboh, Lara Ajamian, Andrew J Mouland
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    ABSTRACT: Viruses that infect cells elicit specific changes to normal cell functions which serve to divert energy and resources for viral replication. Many aspects of host cell function are commandeered by viruses, usually by the expression of viral gene products that recruit host cell proteins and machineries. Moreover, viruses engineer specific membrane organelles or tag on to mobile vesicles and motor proteins to target regions of the cell (during de novo infection, viruses co-opt molecular motor proteins to target the nucleus; later, during virus assembly, they will hijack cellular machineries that will help in the assembly of viruses). Less is understood on how viruses, in particular those with RNA genomes, coordinate the intracellular trafficking of both protein and RNA components and how they achieve assembly of infectious particles at specific loci in the cell. The study of RNA localization began in earlier work. Developing lower eukaryotic embryos and neuronal cells provided important biological information, and also underscored the importance of RNA localization in the programming of gene expression cascades. The study in other organisms and cell systems has yielded similar important information. Viruses are obligate parasites and must utilise their host cells to replicate. Thus, it is critical to understand how RNA viruses direct their RNA genomes from the nucleus, through the nuclear pore, through the cytoplasm and on to one of its final destinations, into progeny virus particles. FISH serves as a useful tool to identify changes in steady-state localization of viral RNA. When combined with immunofluorescence (IF) analysis, FISH/IF co-analyses will provide information on the co-localization of proteins with the viral RNA. This analysis therefore provides a good starting point to test for RNA-protein interactions by other biochemical or biophysical tests, since co-localization by itself is not enough evidence to be certain of an interaction. In studying viral RNA localization using a method like this, abundant information has been gained on both viral and cellular RNA trafficking events. For instance, HIV-1 produces RNA in the nucleus of infected cells but the RNA is only translated in the cytoplasm. When one key viral protein is missing (Rev), FISH of the viral RNA has revealed that the block to viral replication is due to the retention of the HIV-1 genomic RNA in the nucleus. Here, we present the method for visual analysis of viral genomic RNA in situ. The method makes use of a labelled RNA probe. This probe is designed to be complementary to the viral genomic RNA. During the in vitro synthesis of the antisense RNA probe, the ribonucleotide that is modified with digoxigenin (DIG) is included in an in vitro transcription reaction. Once the probe has hybridized to the target mRNA in cells, subsequent antibody labelling steps (Figure 1) will reveal the localization of the mRNA as well as proteins of interest when performing FISH/IF.
    Journal of Visualized Experiments 01/2012;