Leny A Cavalcante

Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Publications (60)158.67 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Ascidians are interesting neurobiological models because of their evolutionary position as a sister-group of vertebrates and the high regenerative capacity of their central nervous system (CNS). We investigated the degeneration and regeneration of the cerebral ganglion complex of the ascidian Styela plicata following injection of the niacinamide antagonist 3-acetylpyridine (3AP), described as targeting the CNS of several vertebrates. For the analysis and establishment of a new model in ascidians, the ganglion complex was dissected and prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), routine light microscopy (LM), immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, 1 or 10 days after injection of 3AP. The Siphon Stimulation Test (SST) was employed to quantify the functional response. One day after the injection of 3AP, CNS degeneration and recruitment of a non-neural cell type to the site of injury was observed by both TEM and LM. Furthermore, weaker immunohistochemical reactions for astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neuronal βIII-tubulin were observed. In contrast, the expression of caspase-3, a protein involved in the apoptotic pathway, and the glycoprotein CD34, a marker for hematopoietic stem cells, increased. Ten days after the injection of 3AP, the expression of markers tended toward the original condition. The SST revealed attenuation and subsequent recovery of the reflexes from 1 to 10 days after 3AP. Therefore, we have developed a new method to study ascidian neural degeneration and regeneration, and identified the decreased expression of GFAP and recruitment of blood stem cells to the damaged ganglion as reasons for the success of neuroregeneration in ascidians. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.
    Developmental Neurobiology 12/2014; 75(8). DOI:10.1002/dneu.22255 · 4.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We examined the effects of conditioned medium from olfactory ensheathing glia (OEGCM) on the differentiation of oligodendrocytes in mixed cultures of early postnatal hippocampi. Differentiation was judged from the numerical density (ND) of cells immunoreactive to 2’3’ cyclic nucleotide 3’phosphodiesterase (CNPase) and O4 antibodies. NDs increased according to inverted-U dose-response curves, particularly for CNPase+ cells (9-fold at optimal dilution) and these changes were blocked by inhibitors of ERK1, p38-MAPK, and PI3K. Our results raise the possibility that OEG secreted factor(s) may counteract demyelization induced by trauma, neurodegenerative diseases, and advanced age, and should stimulate novel methods to deliver these factors and/or potentiating chemicals.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 07/2014; 449(3). DOI:10.1016/j.bbrc.2014.05.051 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The neural system appears before the vascular system in the phylogenetic tree. During evolution, vascular system generation takes advantage of the pre-existing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in order to form its networks. Nevertheless, the role of VEGF in neuronal and glial cells is not yet completely understood. In order to support the hypothesis of a neural role for VEGF, we searched for VEGF- and VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-like immunoreactivities (immunohisto/cytochemistry and Western blotting) in the eyestalk of the invertebrate Ucides cordatus (Crustacea, Brachyura, Ucididae). Our results showed that both neurons and glial cells expressed VEGF-immunoreactivity, and that VEGFR was evidenced in neural cells. This is the first report about the VEGF/VEGFR-like immunoreactivities in the nervous tissue of a crustacean, and enables U. cordatus to be included in the repertoire of animal models used for ascertaining the role of VEGF in the nervous system.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 04/2014; 447(2). DOI:10.1016/j.bbrc.2014.03.137 · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The neural system appears before the vascular system in the phylogenetic tree. During evolution, vascular system generation takes advantage of the pre-existing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in order to form its networks. Nevertheless, the role of VEGF in neuronal and glial cells is not yet completely understood. In order to support the hypothesis of a neural role for VEGF, we searched for VEGF- and VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-like immunoreactivities (immunohisto/cytochemistry and Western blotting) in the eyestalk of the invertebrate Ucides cordatus (Crustacea, Brachyura, Ucididae). Our results showed that both neurons and glial cells expressed VEGF-immunoreactivity, and that VEGFR was evidenced in neural cells. This is the first report about the VEGF/VEGFR-like immunoreactivities in the nervous tissue of a crustacean, and enables U. cordatus to be included in the repertoire of animal models used for ascertaining the role of VEGF in the nervous system.
    Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 01/2014; · 2.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Complex carbohydrate structures are essential molecules of infectious bacteria, parasites, and host cells and are involved in cell signaling associated with immune responses, glycoprotein homeostasis, and cell migration. The uptake of mannose-tailed glycans is usually carried out by professional phagocytes to trigger MHC class I- and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation or, alternatively, to end inflammation. We have detected the mannose receptor (MR) in cultured olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), so we investigated by flow cytometry whether recently dissociated cells of the olfactory bulb (OB) nerve fiber layer (ONL) could bind a mannosylated ligand (fluorescein conjugate of mannosyl bovine serum albumin; Man/BSA-FITC) in a specific manner. In addition, we estimated the relative proportion of ONL OECs, microglia, and astrocytes, tagged by 2'3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase), by the B4 isolectin of Griffonia simplicifonia (IB4), and by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), respectively, that were Man/BSA-FITC(+) . We also determined by histochemistry and/or immunohistochemistry whether Man/BSA-FITC or an anti-MR antibody (anti-C-terminal MR peptide; anti-cMR) labeled OECs and/or parenchymal microglia. In addition, we confirmed by Western blot with the K1K2 (against the entire MR molecule) antibody that a band of about 180 kDA is expressed in the OB. Our findings are compatible with a prospective sentinel role of OECs against pathogens of the upper airways and/or damage-associated glycidic patterns as well as with homeostasis of OB mannosylated glycoproteins. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Journal of Neuroscience Research 12/2013; 91(12). DOI:10.1002/jnr.23285 · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The use of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) has been shown as a putative efficient therapy for stroke. However, the mechanisms of therapeutic action are not yet completely known. Mannose receptor (MR) is a subgroup of the C-type lectin receptor superfamily involved in innate immune response in several tissues. Although known primarily for its immune function, MR also has important roles in cell migration, cell debris clearance and tissue remodeling during inflammation and wound healing. Here we analyzed MR expression in brains of rats one week after induction of unilateral focal cortical ischemia by thermocoagulation in blood vessels of sensorimotor cortex. Additionally, we evaluated possible changes in such expression in cortices of rats subjected to ischemia plus treatment with BMMCs. Our results showed high expression of MR in an unknown GFAP(+) cell type and in phagocytic macrophages/microglia within the lesion boundary zone whereas in the non-injured (contralateral) cortical parenchyma, low levels of MR expression were observed. Moreover, therapy with BMMCs induced overexpression of MR in ipsilateral (injured) cortex. Previous studies from our group have shown functional recovery and decreased neurodegeneration in BMMC-treated rats in the same model of focal cortical ischemia. Thus, we suggest that ischemic injury induces large increase in MR expression as part of a mechanism for clearance of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). In addition, induction of MR overexpression by BMMCs might increase the efficiency of clearance, being one of the protective mechanisms of these cells.
    Brain research 03/2012; 1452:173-84. DOI:10.1016/j.brainres.2012.03.002 · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The use of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) has been shown as a putative efficient therapy for stroke. However, the mechanisms of therapeutic action are not yet completely known. Mannose Receptor (MR) is a subgroup of the C-type lectin receptor superfamily involved in innate immune response in several tissues. Although known primarily for its immune function, MR also has important roles in cell migration, cell debris clearance and tissue remodeling during inflammation and wound healing. Here we analyzed MR expression in brains of rats one week after induction of unilateral focal cortical ischemia by thermocoagulation in blood vessels of sensorimotor cortex. Additionally, we evaluated possible changes in such expression in cortices of rats subjected to ischemia plus treatment with BMMCs. Our results showed high expression of MR in an unknown GFAP+ cell type and in phagocytic macrophages/microglia within the lesion boundary zone whereas in the non-injured (contralateral) cortical parenchyma, low levels of MR expression were observed. Moreover, therapy with BMMCs induced overexpression of MR in ipsilateral (injured) cortex. Previous studies from our group have shown functional recovery and decreased neurodegeneration in BMMCs-treated rats in the same model of focal cortical ischemia. Thus, we suggest that ischemic injury induces large increase in MR expression as part of a mechanism for clearance of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). In addition, induction of MR overexpression by BMMCs might increase the efficiency of clearance, being one of the protective mechanisms of these cells.
    Brain Research 03/2012; · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a special glia that ensheath olfactory receptor axons that enter the brain via olfactory phila, thus, providing a potential route for access of pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp), that has a capsule rich in mannosyl residues, is the most common cause of rhinosinusitis that may evolve to meningitis. We have tested whether OECs in vitro express the mannose receptor (MR), and could internalize Sp via MR. Cultures were infected by a suspension of Sp (ATCC 49619), recognized by an anti-Sp antibody, in a 100:1 bacteria:cells ratio. Competition assays, by means of mannan, showed around a 15-fold reduction in the number of internalized bacteria. To verify whether MR could be involved in Sp uptake, OECs were reacted with an antibody against the MR C-terminal peptide (anti-cMR) and bacteria were visualized with Sytox Green. Selective cMR-immunoreaction was seen in perinuclear compartments containing bacteria whereas mannan-treated cultures showed an extremely low percentage of internalized bacteria and only occasional adhered bacteria. Our data suggest the involvement of MR in adhesion of bacteria to OEC surface, and in their internalization. Data are also coherent with a role of OECs as a host cell prior to (and during) bacterial invasion of the brain.
    Neuroscience Research 12/2010; 69(4):308-13. DOI:10.1016/j.neures.2010.12.015 · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Complex carbohydrate structures are essential molecules of infectious microbes and host cells, and are involved in cell signaling associated with inflammatory and immune responses. The uptake of mannose-tailed glycans is usually carried out by macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), and other professional phagocytes to trigger MHC class I- and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation, and to promote T cell effector responses. Since Schwann cells (SCs) have been proposed as immunocompetent cells, we investigated whether a human cell line (ST88-14 cells) could bind mannosylated ligands in a specific manner. The saturation of uptake of mannosylated molecules by ST88-14 cells and the internalization and distribution pathway of these ligands were tested by cytometry and confocal plus electron microscopy, respectively. This uptake showed a dose-dependent increase, the saturation point being reached at high concentrations of mannosyl residues/240 mM mannose. Merging of man/BSA-FITC and S100 labeling showed their partial, but, significant colocalization. Ultrastructural analysis of ST88-14 cells after incubation with HRP-colloidal gold, without or with subsequent chasing at 37C, showed an initial location on the cell surface and temperature- and time-dependent internalization of the probe. Our findings suggest an efficient mannosylated ligand uptake system through putative lectin(s) that may be operational in inflammatory and immune responses.
    Histology and histopathology 09/2009; 24(8):1029-34. · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mannose receptor (MR) is a transmembrane glycoprotein, postulated to be a link between innate and adaptive immunity. MR is expressed in several cell types but no information is available on that for Schwann cells (SC). We show that rodent SC in primary cultures take up the MR ligand mannosyl/bovine serum albumin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (man/BSA-FITC) in a highly specific manner and bind an antibody against the C-terminus of the murine macrophage MR (anti-cMR). After incubation with man/BSA-FITC, flow cytometry demonstrates 90% positive SC, a dose-dependent increase in tagged cellular components and near total inhibition of the neoglycoprotein uptake by D-mannose or by the mannosylated protein horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Western blot for MR shows that SC share a unique protein of about 180 kDa with peritoneal resident macrophages. Treatment of cultured SC with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) or dexamethasone (DM) followed by the addition of man/BSA-FITC and analysis by flow cytometry shows down- or upregulation, respectively, of man/BSA-FITC uptake. Our results show that SC express the MR in a prospectively functional state and suggest an antigen-presenting function of SC, compatible with a role in infectious/inflammatory states of the peripheral nervous system.
    Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System 07/2009; 14(2):84-92. DOI:10.1111/j.1529-8027.2009.00217.x · 2.50 Impact Factor
  • Wagner Baetas-da-Cruz · Suzana Corte-Real · Leny A Cavalcante
    International journal of infectious diseases: IJID: official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases 02/2009; 13(5):e323-4. DOI:10.1016/j.ijid.2008.11.008 · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    British Journal of Dermatology 04/2008; 158(3):631-3. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2133.2007.08368.x · 4.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ongoing research on the roles of the gas nitric oxide (NO) in the nervous system has demonstrated its involvement in neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, learning, excitotoxicity, neurodegenerative diseases and regulation of the cerebral blood flow. Thus, this molecule has been currently considered an important neuromodulator in CNS. Studies carried out in the visual system, particularly in the retinotectal component, have contributed to this current concept about NO. In the present work, we reviewed critically current data about nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression in the superior colliculus/optic tectum, as well as the roles of NO in the formation of the retinotopic map and in synaptic plasticity. Several vertebrate species have been used in studies about the NOS expression in the retinotectal system and most of the available results are in agreement with the involvement of NO in the developmental refinement of the retinotectal projections, and its role as a neuromodulator of synaptic function during the processing of visual information. However, the few studies about the functional linkage between NOS expression/NO synthesis and retinotectal topographic refinement/tectal synaptic plasticity are not conclusive and/or sometimes inconsistent, indicating that more experimental data are necessary to improve the understanding about NO functions in this visual subsystem. Predictive models for the involvement of NO as a retrograde messenger in the developmental retinotectal refinement are discussed.
    Brain Research Reviews 01/2008; 56(2):403-26. DOI:10.1016/j.brainresrev.2007.09.005 · 5.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously characterized some crustacean glial cells by markers such as 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Here we use antibodies against glutamine synthetase full-length molecule (anti-GS/FL), a GS C-terminal peptide (anti-GS/20aa-C), and brain S100 (anti-S100), as well as the binding of the insect glia and rat astrocytic marker Datura stramonium lectin (DSL), in the optic lobe of the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. All markers label the lamina ganglionaris cartridge region (lighter: anti-GS/FL; heavier: DSL). In addition, anti-GS/FL labels superficial somata of external and internal medullas and internal chiasm cells. Both anti-GS/20aa-C and anti-S100 label heavily the glial sheaths of the lamina ganglionaris. In addition, anti-S100 binds to the perineurial glia of medullary parenchymal vessels. Western blot analyses show that both anti-GS/FL and anti-GS/20aa-C bind mostly to a band of 50-55 kDa, compatible with a long isoform of vertebrate GS, and accessorily to a possible dimer and, in the case of anti-GS/20aa-C, to an ill-defined band of intermediate mass. Binding of anti-S100 is selective for a single band of about 68 kDa but shows no protein in the weight range of the canonical S100 protein superfamily. DSL reveals two bands of about 75 and about 120 kDa, thus within the range of maximal recognition for rat astrocytes. Our results suggest that phenotype protein markers of the optic lobe glia share antigenic determinants with S100 and (a long form of) GS and that, similarly to vertebrate and insect glia, crustacean glia protein and N-glycan residue markers display regional heterogeneity.
    Glia 04/2006; 53(6):612-20. DOI:10.1002/glia.20317 · 6.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our knowledge of astroglia and their physiological and pathophysiological role(s) in the central nervous system (CNS) has grown during the past decade, revealing a complex picture. It is becoming increasingly clear that glia play a significant role in the homeostasis and function of the CNS and that neurons should no longer be considered the only cell type that responds, both rapidly and slowly, to electrochemical activity. We discuss recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the impact of hypoxia and ischemia on astrocytic metabolism and the functional relationship between glucose metabolism and gap junctions in astrocytes. We also address the controversy over whether astrocytic gap junctions mediate protection or killing of neurons during or after hypoxic or ischemic insults.
    Glia 06/2005; 50(4):351-61. DOI:10.1002/glia.20213 · 6.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Leishmania amazonensis, an obligatory intracellular parasite, survives internalization by macrophages, but no information is available on the involvement of microglia. We have investigated microglia-protozoa interactions in mixed glial cultures infected with promastigote forms of L. amazonensis after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or dexamethasone (DM) treatment. After 2 hr of exposure to parasites in control cultures, there was a small number of infected microglia (1%). Preincubation with LPS or DM led to 14% or 60% of microglial cells with attached parasites, respectively. DM treatment resulted in 39% of microglial cells with internalized parasites (controls or LPS-treated cells had < or =1%). Scanning electron micrographs showed numerous filopodia in DM-treated cells, whereas these projections were rarely observed in LPS-treated or control cells. DM treatment also affected the intramicroglial survival of Leishmania. In control cultures, internalized parasites, tagged with an anti-lipophosphoglycan (anti-LPG) antibody, showed fragmented DNA [terminal deoxyribonucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP-X nick end labeling (TUNEL+)] after 4 hr of interaction, but changes seemed slightly delayed in DM-treated cultures. After 12 hr, there were no LPG+/TUNEL+ profiles in controls, whereas rare LPG+ profiles still persisted in DM-treated cells. Our results suggest that microglia are highly effective in the elimination of Leishmania and that the process can be effectively studied by LPG/TUNEL double labeling.
    Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry 09/2004; 52(8):1047-55. DOI:10.1369/jhc.3A6242.2004 · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Synemin (Syn) is an intermediate filament (IF) protein. To gain insight into a morphogenetic role of Syn, we have studied its expression patterns in the developing human retina and lens and compared it with those of other IF proteins. In addition, we have tested Syn expression in fetuses (23 and 28 weeks) affected by Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), Meckel syndrome, and trisomy 13. In the retina, Syn expression starts in the nerve fiber and ganglion cell layers (NFL and GCL) at 15 weeks, remains there in up to 20 weeks, and spreads to other layers and may be colocalized with vimentin, GFA, or neurofilaments in the subsequent 16 weeks. This expansion of Synemin expression from 20 to 28 weeks is not observed in WWS in which Syn immunoreactivity in NFL is reduced and Vim expression is increased. Changes are seen in Syn or vimentin expressions in the retinae of 23-week-old Meckel syndrome or 28-week-old trisomy 13 fetuses. Syn expression in the lens is, at first (16 weeks), uniformly distributed, becoming stronger in the epithelium of the anterior part at 25 weeks and later. As in the retina, Syn expression in lens is also selectively affected in WWS. The colocalization of Synemin with vimentin, GFA, or NF supports the idea that Syn is a key cross-linking protein that connects different cytoskeletal structures. Moreover, stagnant Syn expression in WWS retina and lens reinforces the notion of a significant role of this protein in morphogenesis.
    Experimental Neurology 11/2003; 183(2):499-507. DOI:10.1016/S0014-4886(03)00240-1 · 4.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Proteoglycans are abundant in the developing brain and there is much circumstantial evidence for their roles in directional neuronal movements such as cell body migration and axonal growth. We have developed an in vitro model of astrocyte cultures of the lateral and medial sectors of the embryonic mouse midbrain, that differ in their ability to support neuritic growth of young midbrain neurons, and we have searched for the role of interactive proteins and proteoglycans in this model. Neurite production in co-cultures reveals that, irrespective of the previous location of neurons in the midbrain, medial astrocytes exert an inhibitory or nonpermissive effect on neuritic growth that is correlated to a higher content of both heparan and chondroitin sulfates (HS and CS). Treatment of astrocytes with chondroitinase ABC revealed a growth-promoting effect of CS on lateral glia but treatment with exogenous CS-4 indicated a U-shaped dose-response curve for CS. In contrast, the growth-inhibitory action of medial astrocytes was reversed by exogenous CS-4. Treatment of astrocytes with heparitinase indicated that the growth-inhibitory action of medial astrocytes may depend heavily on HS by an as yet unknown mechanism. The results are discussed in terms of available knowledge on the binding of HS proteoglycans to interactive proteins, with emphasis on the importance of unraveling the physiological functions of glial glycoconjugates for a better understanding of neuron-glial interactions.
    Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research 09/2003; 36(8):993-1002. DOI:10.1590/S0100-879X2003000800005 · 1.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Glial cells, in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, provide an essential environment for developmental, supportive, and physiological functions. However, information on glial cells themselves and on glial cell markers, with the exception of those of Drosophila and other insects, is not abundant in invertebrate organisms. A common ultrastructural feature of invertebrate nervous systems is that layers of glial cell cytoplasm-rich processes ensheath axons and neuronal and glial somata. In the present study, we have examined the binding of a monoclonal antibody to 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) in the compound eye and optic lobe of the crab Ucides cordatus using both light and electron microscopy. CNPase is a noncompact myelin protein that is a phenotypic marker of oligodendroglial and Schwann cells, is apparently involved in the ensheathment step prior to myelin compaction, and is also expressed by the potentially myelinating olfactory ensheathing glia. CNPase has raised much interest, first by virtue of its unusual enzymatic activity and more recently by its membrane-skeletal features and possible involvement in migration or expansion of membranes. We have found CNPase-like immunoreactivity in most cells of the compound eye basement membrane and both in optic cartridges of the synaptic layer and cells of the outer sublayer of the lamina ganglionaris. The results suggest that in the crab visual system some, but not all, glial cells, including some adaxonal glia, may express the noncompact myelin protein CNPase or a related protein.
    Glia 09/2003; 43(3):292-8. DOI:10.1002/glia.10264 · 6.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The olfactory bulb (OB) presents a unique pattern of permanent acquisition of primary afferents and interneurons, but not much detail is known about the differentiation of its oligodendroglial cells. We studied the expression of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase), a protein related to axonal ensheathment by myelinating cells. Expression of CNPase in OB follows a general caudorostral gradient, with the exception of the glomerular layer (GL). At postnatal day 5-6 (P5-P6), the first CNPase(+) profiles appeared in the dorsal lateral olfactory tract adjacent to the accessory OB (AOB), followed by rare cell bodies and processes in AOB internal plexiform layer at P7. At P9, the main OB (MOB) granular cell layer (GrCL) already showed intensely stained CNPase(+) processes. From P5 to P12, small numbers of CNPase(+) cells were found in the subventricular zone (SVZ), throughout its rostral extension (SVZ-RE), and in the intrabulbar subependymal layer. The appearance of CNPase(+) profiles delimiting glomeruli started in the GL rostralmost region at P12, extending to all GL levels, but glomeruli remained open caudally at P15. At P18, oligodendroglial glomeruli were evident throughout OB, but the adult pattern was established only after P30. There was no age-related loss of CNPase immunoreactivity in glial cell bodies, possibly indicating de novo ensheathment of neurites. Our results show an earlier onset of oligodendroglial differentiation in OB than previously reported and a rostrocaudal gradient of formation of oligodendroglial glomeruli. They also raise the possibility that a minor fraction of OB oligodendrocytes might derive from the SVZ-RE.
    Journal of Neuroscience Research 08/2003; 73(4):471-80. DOI:10.1002/jnr.10678 · 2.73 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

798 Citations
158.67 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1978–2014
    • Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
      • • Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho (IBCCF)
      • • Programa de Bioengenharia e Terapias Celulares
      • • Departamento de Microbiologia Médica
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 2004
    • Fundação Oswaldo Cruz
      • Departamento de Biologia Celular e Ultraestrutura Celular (CPqAM)
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 1986
    • Fundação Planetário da Cidade do Rio de janeiro
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil