Kathrin Heser

University of Bonn, Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Are you Kathrin Heser?

Claim your profile

Publications (6)20.43 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background In the revised version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) the Mood Disorder Workgroup for DSM-V the bereavement exclusion criterion for the diagnosis of major depression has been eliminated. Aim To investigate the impact of bereavement on the incidence of depression and depressive symptoms in the elderly. Method Participants over 75 years from the longitudinal German Study on Ageing, Cognition, and Dementia in Primary Care Patients (AgeCoDe) that were still married at baseline were investigated (n=1,193). Data from four follow-ups (time frame: 6 years) were investigated. The response rate at baseline was 50.3%. Three clinical endpoints were analyzed: depressive symptoms according to Geriatric Depression Scale (1) GDS≥6, (2) GDS≥10, and (3) Major Depression (MD). The effect of loss was investigated using random-effects regression models. Results Experiencing a loss of spouse was predictive of a higher incidence in GDS≥6 (OR 4.52, 95% CI 2.6–7.9) and 10 (OR 5.59, 95% CI 1.8–17.0) even after adjusting for age, gender, impairment at baseline, and GDS score at baseline. Associations with MD were not significant (OR 1.77, 96% CI 0.9–3.5). Conclusions Older adults experiencing the loss of their spouse are more likely to display elevated levels of depressive symptoms, that may reach a concerning level of severity.
    Journal of affective disorders 01/2014; 161:97–103. · 3.76 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To analyse predictors of costs in dementia from a societal perspective in a longitudinal setting. Healthcare resource use and costs were assessed retrospectively using a questionnaire in four waves at 6-month intervals in a sample of dementia patients (N = 175). Sociodemographic data, dementia severity and comorbidity at baseline, cognitive impairment and impairment in basic and instrumental activities of daily living were also recorded. Linear mixed regression models with random intercepts for individuals were used to analyse predictors of total and sector-specific costs. Impairment in activities of daily living significantly predicted total costs in dementia patients, with associations between basic activities of daily living and formal care costs on the one and instrumental activities of daily living and informal care costs on the other hand. Nursing home residence was associated with lower total costs than residence in the community. There was no effect of cognition on total or sector-specific costs. Cognitive deficits in dementia are associated with costs only via their effect on the patients' capacity for activities of daily living. Transition into a nursing home may reduce total costs from a societal perspective, owing to the fact that a high amount of informal care required by severely demented patients prior to transition into a nursing home may cause higher costs than inpatient nursing care.
    Value in Health 05/2013; 16(3):A104. · 2.19 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Depression is a risk factor for stroke and mortality but whether this also holds into old age is uncertain. We therefore studied the association of depression with the risk for non-fatal stroke and all-cause mortality in very old age. METHODS: A representative sample of 3085 primary care patients aged ≥75 years were serially assessed during a 6-year follow-up. The relation between depression (Geriatric Depression Scale >6, n=261) and relevant covariates including vascular risk factors and disease, functional and mild cognitive impairment and ApoE genotype on primary care givers information of incident stroke (n=209) and mortality (n=647) were assessed by Cox regression and by competing risk regressions. RESULTS: Depression was not independently associated with incident stroke in fully adjusted models that treated death as the competing event (subdistribution hazard ratio=0.80, 95% confidence interval=0.47 to 1.36). The risk associated with depression was similar for men and women, and for age groups 75-79, 80-84 and ≥85 years. In contrast, depression increased all-cause mortality rates, even after adjusting for a range of confounders (hazard ratio=1.31, 95% confidence interval=1.03 to 1.67). LIMITATIONS: We have no information on past depressive episodes and cause of death. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to reports in younger populations, depression does not appear to increase stroke risk among the old and very old, but continuous to be a risk factor for all-cause mortality.
    Journal of affective disorders 03/2013; · 3.76 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Whether late-onset depression is a risk factor for or a prodrome of dementia remains unclear. We investigated the impact of depressive symptoms and early- v. late-onset depression on subsequent dementia in a cohort of elderly general-practitioner patients (n = 2663, mean age = 81.2 years). Method Risk for subsequent dementia was estimated over three follow-ups (each 18 months apart) depending on history of depression, particularly age of depression onset, and current depressive symptoms using proportional hazard models. We also examined the additive prediction of incident dementia by depression beyond cognitive impairment. RESULTS: An increase of dementia risk for higher age cut-offs of late-onset depression was found. In analyses controlling for age, sex, education, and apolipoprotein E4 genotype, we found that very late-onset depression (aged ⩾70 years) and current depressive symptoms separately predicted all-cause dementia. Combined very late-onset depression with current depressive symptoms was specifically predictive for later Alzheimer's disease (AD; adjusted hazard ratio 5.48, 95% confidence interval 2.41-12.46, p < 0.001). This association was still significant after controlling for cognitive measures, but further analyses suggested that it was mediated by subjective memory impairment with worries. CONCLUSIONS: Depression might be a prodrome of AD but not of dementia of other aetiology as very late-onset depression in combination with current depressive symptoms, possibly emerging as a consequence of subjectively perceived worrisome cognitive deterioration, was most predictive. As depression parameters and subjective memory impairment predicted AD independently of objective cognition, clinicians should take this into account.
    Psychological Medicine 11/2012; · 5.59 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Social support has been suggested to positively influence cognition and mortality in old age. However, this suggestion has been questioned due to inconsistent operationalisations of social support among studies and the small number of longitudinal studies available. This study aims to investigate the influence of perceived social support, understood as the emotional component of social support, on cognition and mortality in old age as part of a prospective longitudinal multicentre study in Germany. A national subsample of 2,367 primary care patients was assessed twice over an observation period of 18 months regarding the influence of social support on cognitive function and mortality. Perceived social support was assessed using the 14-item version of the FSozU, which is a standardised and validated questionnaire of social support. Cognition was tested by the neuropsychological test battery of the Structured Interview for the Diagnosis of Dementia (SIDAM). The influence of perceived support on cognitive change was analysed by multivariate ANCOVA; mortality was analysed by multivariate logistic and cox regression. Sample cognitive change (N = 1,869): Mean age was 82.4 years (SD 3.3) at the beginning of the observation period, 65.9% were female, mean cognition was 49 (SD 4.4) in the SIDAM. Over the observation period cognitive function declined in 47.2% by a mean of 3.4 points. Sample mortality (N = 2,367): Mean age was 82.5 years (SD 3.4), 65.7% were female and 185 patients died during the observation period. Perceived social support showed no longitudinal association with cognitive change (F = 2.235; p = 0.135) and mortality (p = 0.332; CI 0.829-1.743). Perceived social support did not influence cognition and mortality over an 18 months observation period. However, previous studies using different operationalisations of social support and longer observation periods indicate that such an influence may exist. This influence is rather small and the result of complex interaction mechanisms between different components of social support; the emotional component seems to have no or only a limited effect. Further research is needed to describe the complex interactions between components of social support. Longer observation periods are necessary and standardised operationalisations of social support should be applied.
    BMC Geriatrics 03/2012; 12:9. · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The diagnostic criteria for dementia include reliable evidence of cognitive deterioration over time measured by cognitive tests. The Structured Interview for the Diagnosis of Dementia of the Alzheimer Type, Multi-infarct Dementia and Dementia of other Etiology according to DSM-III-R, DSM-IV and ICD-10 (SIDAM) is a neuropsychological instrument to determine cognitive status in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. Normative data for changes in cognitive functioning that normally occur in cognitively healthy individuals are required to interpret changes in SIDAM test scores. A sample of 1,090 cognitively healthy individuals participating in the German Study on Ageing, Cognition and Dementia in Primary Care Patients (AgeCoDe) aged 75 years and older was assessed four times at 1.5-year intervals over a period of 4.5 years using the SIDAM. Age- and education-specific reliable change indices (RCIs) accounting for probable measurement error and practice effects were computed for a 90% confidence interval. Across different age and education subgroups, changes from at least 3-5 points indicated significant (i.e. reliable) changes in SIDAM test scores at the 90% confidence level. This study offers age- and education-specific normative data for the SIDAM based upon established RCI methods. The RCI scores provided in this study may help clinicians and researchers to interpret cognitive changes in SIDAM test scores and may contribute to the early detection and diagnosis of MCI and dementia in the elderly.
    Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders 03/2012; 33(2-3):73-83. · 2.79 Impact Factor