E. Alted López

Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Madrid, Spain

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Publications (23)35.43 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Quantifying and evaluating the response to the bedside monitor alarms (BMA) by nurses in intensive care unit (ICU). Metodology: Prospective observational study (October 2011-January 2012). Randomized blind audit on alarm management. Alarm programming and alarm limits were related to experience in ICU. We evaluated the response to BMA with the variables: alarm type (relevant/not relevant/alert) and response type. Descriptive analysis of variables for multivariate ANOVA and Chi-square test with SPSS 17.0.
    Enfermeria intensiva / Sociedad Espanola de Enfermeria Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Aims Quantifying and evaluating the response to the bedside monitor alarms (BMA) by nurses in intensive care unit (ICU). Metodology: Prospective observational study (October 2011-January 2012). Randomized blind audit on alarm management. Alarm programming and alarm limits were related to experience in ICU. We evaluated the response to BMA with the variables: alarm type (relevant/not relevant/alert) and response type. Descriptive analysis of variables for multivariate ANOVA and Chi-square test with SPSS 17.0. Results 434 audits were analyzed. The programming was: Blood pressure (BP) 88.25%, heart rate (HR) 98.62% O2 saturation (SO) 96.79%, respiratory rate (FR) 65.75%. The alarms originated were BP 49.73%, 10.75% HR, 39.25% SO, 3.27% FS. The nurse responded to 93.3% of them and 50% were treated before 10 sec. 56.16% of the alarms were not relevant, 25.12% relevant and 18.72% alerting. 41.8% were due to handling. Conclusion The alarms are programmed/attended by the nurse and there is uniformity in programming/selection limits. 25% of BMA carried therapeutic attitude.
    Enfermería Intensiva 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: To assess pain in non-communicative patients with severe trauma undergoing mechanical ventilation prior to, during and after tracheal suctioning, mobilization and wound care. A prospective and observational study from October to December 2011 was performed. Study variables were ESCID scale and monitoring of vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate). Data were gathering 5minutes before, during and 15minutes after the 3procedures. The nursing evolutive report recorded pain assessment, administration and effectiveness of the analgesia. Descriptive analysis of variables included Student's T test/ANOVA for multivariate analysis with SPSS 17.0. A hundred eighty four observations: 46.8% tracheal suctioning, 38.5% mobilization and 14.7% wound care were performed in 29 patients. ESCID score was 0.4±1 before, 3.4±2.7 during and 0.4±1 after for wound care; 0.4±1.1 before, 3.6±2.2 during and 1.1±0.5 for tracheal suctioning; 0.5±1.1 before, 3±2.8 during and 0.2±0.8 after for mobilization. These increased significantly during the performance of the 3procedures before-during/during-after: P=.000. All the hemodynamic variables were significantly modified during mobilization and tracheal suctioning: before-during/during-after: P=.000, with the exception of the cures that only affected respiratory rate. 27% of the procedures received analgesia: 9% received it before, 15% during and 3.2% after, with more analgesia being required for the wound care (33.3%). The data collected in the nursing report on the evaluation of pain/effectiveness of the analgesia showed 20.66%. An increase on the ESCID score was observed while performing the procedures.
    Enfermería Intensiva 10/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To assess pain in non-communicative patients with severe trauma undergoing mechanical ventilation prior to, during and after tracheal suctioning, mobilization and wound care. Material and method A prospective and observational study from October to December 2011 was performed. Study variables were ESCID scale and monitoring of vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate). Data were gathering 5 minutes before, during and 15 minutes after the 3 procedures. The nursing evolutive report recorded pain assessment, administration and effectiveness of the analgesia. Descriptive analysis of variables included Student's T test/ANOVA for multivariate analysis with SPSS 17.0. Results A hundred eighty four observations: 46.8% tracheal suctioning, 38.5% mobilization and 14.7% wound care were performed in 29 patients. ESCID score was 0.4 ± 1 before, 3.4 ± 2.7 during and 0.4 ± 1 after for wound care; 0.4 ± 1.1 before, 3.6 ± 2.2 during and 1.1 ± 0.5 for tracheal suctioning; 0.5 ± 1.1 before, 3 ± 2.8 during and 0.2 ± 0.8 after for mobilization. These increased significantly during the performance of the 3 procedures before-during/during-after: P = .000. All the hemodynamic variables were significantly modified during mobilization and tracheal suctioning: before-during/during-after: P = .000, with the exception of the cures that only affected respiratory rate. 27% of the procedures received analgesia: 9% received it before, 15% during and 3.2% after, with more analgesia being required for the wound care (33.3%). The data collected in the nursing report on the evaluation of pain/effectiveness of the analgesia showed 20.66%. Conclusion An increase on the ESCID score was observed while performing the procedures.
    Enfermería Intensiva 01/2013; 24(4):137–144.
  • A. Baeza Roman, L. Colino Gómez, E. Alted López
    Medicina Intensiva 04/2012; · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To validate a safety tool used in high-risk sectors (safety briefing) in intensive care medicine. DESIGN: A prospective, observational and analytical study was carried out. SETTING: Trauma and emergency intensive care unit in a tertiary hospital. PATIENTS: Patients with severe trauma (Injury Severity Score ISS≥16). INTERVENTION: Documentation of incidents related to patient safety (PS). VARIABLES: Patients characteristics, state of the Unit, patient safety incidents, aspects of the tool (SP) and safety culture impact. RESULTS: We included 441 patients (75.15% males, mean age 39.9±17.5 years), with blunt trauma in 89% and a 10.5% mortality rate. The tool was applied in 586 out of 798 possible shifts (73.4%), and documented 942 events (2.20 incidents per patient). The incidents were more frequently associated with medication (20.7%), devices (placement 4.03%, and maintenance 17.8%) and airway and mechanical ventilation (MV) (17.09%). A correlation was established between the occurrence of incidents and the characteristics of the patient (higher Injury Severity Score, presence of MV, and continuous renal replacement therapies) and the status of the Unit (more than 6 patients per shift out of 8 possible, and holiday period). The tool significantly influenced different aspects of the safety culture of the unit (communication frequency, number of events, punitive loss and active work in PS). CONCLUSIONS: Safety briefing is a tool for the documentation of incidents that is simple and easy to use, and is useful for implementing improvements and in influencing safety culture.
    Medicina Intensiva 01/2012; 36(7):481-487. · 1.32 Impact Factor
  • A Baeza Roman, L Colino Gómez, E Alted López
    Medicina Intensiva 02/2011; 36(3):243. · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AimsTo determine compliance of the standard “semirecumbent position between 30–45o in patients with artificial airway (AA)”. To know the opinion of the professionals on this issue.
    World Pumps 01/2011; 22(3):117-124.
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    ABSTRACT: The clinical value of routine chest X-rays in critical care has been questioned, but has not been studied in the trauma environment to date. The objective of this study was to identify easy to use clinical predictors of utility in this setting. A prospective observational study was made in an 8-bed traumatology ICU. Severe trauma patients (ISS > 15), aged 15 or older and admitted for 48 h or longer were included. Pregnant women and radiographs obtained during initial care or for reasons other than routine indication were excluded. A staff physician, separated from clinical duties, independently reviewed the films in search of changes, as described in a closed checklist. Following closed criteria, the attending physicians reported previous day clinical events and changes in clinical management after chest X-ray obtainment. Demographic and epidemiological data were also recorded. The associations among variables were studied by univariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 1440 routine chest X-rays were obtained from 138 consecutive patients during one year. Young males prevailed (82%; 39 ± 16 years). The most common process was severe blunt trauma (97%). Fifty-two percent suffered severe chest trauma. The mean length of stay was 12.9 ± 10.1 days. Mechanical ventilation was used in 86.8% of the cases. A median of 10.4 ± 9.3 films were obtained from each patient. A total of 14% of the X-rays showed changes, most commonly malpositioning of an indwelling device (6.8%) or infiltrates (4.9%). Those findings led to a change in care in 84.6% of the cases. Multivariate analysis identified the following significant (p < 0.05) risk factors for radiographic changes: first two days of evolution, mechanical ventilation, worsening of PaO₂/FiO₂, worsening of lung compliance and changes in respiratory secretions. Based on the results obtained, the risk of not identifying dangerous conditions by restricting routine chest X-rays prescription to the described conditions is low. Observing this policy would probably mean substantial savings and a reduction in radiation exposure.
    Medicina Intensiva 01/2011; 35(5):280-5. · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background The clinical value of routine chest X-rays in critical care has been questioned, but has not been studied in the trauma environment to date. The objective of this study was to identify easy to use clinical predictors of utility in this setting.
    Medicina Intensiva 01/2011; 35(5):280-285. · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine compliance of the standard "semirecumbent position between 30-45° in patients with artificial airway (AA)". To know the opinion of the professionals on this issue. An observational, prospective study was carried out in December 2009 in the ICU department of a tertiary hospital that excluded the limitation of therapeutic effort, prone position and antitrendelemburg. Data collected: headrest angle, professional experience of the nurse, shift, perception of the auditor, diagnostic, type of AA (tracheostomy or endotracheal tube), mechanical ventilation (MV) (yes/no) and enteral nutrition (EN). Nurses were surveyed to verify if they knew the standard, if they complied with it, the method used and their suggestions. We used the Student's t test and ANOVA for multivariable analysis, and Fisher's χ2; p<0.05=significant. A total of 546 valid measurements were obtained from 53 patients, of which 40.9% had the correct semirecumbent position (30-45°). Professionals with <1 year of experience were those who raised the headrest the least, with only 26.4% of these measurements over 30°. The standard was met in only 34.8% of the neurocritical patients (NC) vs non NC (46.7%) (p<0.05). It was <30° in 29.2% of patients with tracheostomy vs 44% measurements performed on patients with TOT (p<0.05). There were no differences between shifts, the use of MV or EN. Diagnostic accuracy of the auditor: sensitivity: 91.6%; specificity: 72.5%; positive predictive value: 70.2%; negative predictive value (NPV): 92.4%. 97.9% of responders know the standard. Visual judgment was used in 97.2% of the cases. Measured compliance was less than 50% although the standard is well known by the nursing team. Even though the subjective perception has a high NPV, it does not achieve the standard.
    Enfermería Intensiva 01/2011; 22(3):117-24.
  • E Alted López
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    ABSTRACT: Trauma is a pandemic disease in the current society. In an attempt to minimize its impact, trauma care systems have been developed, the basic component being the Trauma Centers (TC). Management of the patient with severe trauma in the TC is supported by moderate scientific evidence, with many studies, but of weak quality. It is described how the volume, experience, availability of resources and other aspects are able to decrease mortality and achieve functional improvement in the TC in severe trauma patients.
    Medicina Intensiva 04/2010; 34(3):188-93. · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To analyze diagnostic (blood drawings) and iatrogenic (Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy, CRRT) blood losses (BL) in severe trauma patients.
    Enfermería Intensiva. 01/2010; 21(3).
  • E Alted López, S Bermejo, M Chico
    Medicina Intensiva 11/2009; 33(8):409-10. · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important reason of morbidity-mortality all over the world, affecting young males more and generating Public Health problem. Unfortunately, the advances in the pathophysiology knowledge have not followed a similar development in therapeutic options, there currently not being any contrasted neuroprotectants. In this article, we have reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic measures used in the management of patient with severe TBI. The general measures as well as those aimed at controlling intracranial hypertension, the role of the surgery and some more innovative therapeutic options currently under evaluation in these patients are analyzed.
    Medicina Intensiva 02/2009; 33(1):16-30. · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important reason of morbidity-mortality all over the world, affecting young males more and generating Public Health problem. Unfortunately, the advances in the pathophysiology knowledge have not followed a similar development in therapeutic options, there currently not being any contrasted neuroprotectants. In this article, we have reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic measures used in the management of patient with severe TBI. The general measures as well as those aimed at controlling intracranial hypertension, the role of the surgery and some more innovative therapeutic options currently under evaluation in these patients are analyzed.
    Medicina Intensiva 01/2009; 33(1):16-30. · 1.32 Impact Factor
  • E. Alted López, S. Bermejo, M. Chico
    Medicina Intensiva 01/2009; 33(8):409-410. · 1.32 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Article: Sedation
    Intensive Care Medicine 09/2005; 18:S157-S158. · 5.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We proposed to compare the efficacy and safety of midazolam and propofol in its new preparation (2% propofol) when used for prolonged, deep sedation in traumatized, critically ill patients. We also retrospectively compared 2% propofol with its original preparation, 1% propofol, used in a previous study in a similar and contemporary set of patients. A prospective, randomized, unblinded trial (midazolam and 2% propofol) and a retrospective, contemporary trial (2% propofol and 1% propofol). A trauma intensive care unit in a tertiary university hospital. A total of 63 consecutive trauma patients, admitted within a period of 5 months and requiring mechanical ventilatory support for >48 hrs, 43 of whom (73%) suffered severe head trauma. We also retrospectively compared the 2% propofol group with a series of patients in whom 1% propofol was used. For the prospective trial, we randomized two groups--a midazolam group with continuous administration of midazolam at dosages 0.1-0.35 mg/kg/hr, and a 2% propofol group with continuous infusion at dosages 1.5-6 mg/kg/hr. Equal dosages of analgesics were administered. Similar management protocols were applied in the 1% propofol group, used in the retrospective analysis with 2% propofol. Epidemiologic and efficacy variables were recorded. Hemodynamic and biochemical variables were also monitored on a regular basis. Neuromonitoring was also performed on those patients with head trauma. Sedation adequacy was similar and patient behavior after drug discontinuation was not different in either prospective group (midazolam and 2% propofol). Hemodynamic or neuromonitoring variables were also similar for both groups. Triglyceride levels were significantly higher in the 2% propofol group compared with the midazolam group. A higher number of therapeutic failures because of sedative inefficacy was seen in the 2% propofol group compared with the midazolam group, especially during the first sedation days. When comparing 2% propofol and 1% propofol, a significantly higher number of therapeutic failures because of hypertriglyceridemia were found in the 1% propofol group, as opposed to a major number of therapeutic failures because of inefficacy, found in the 2% propofol group. Propofol's new preparation is safe when used in severely traumatized patients. Its more concentrated formula improves the lipid overload problem seen with the prolonged use of the previous preparation. Nevertheless, a major number of therapeutic failures were detected with 2% propofol because of the need for dosage increase. This fact could be caused by a different disposition and tissue distribution pattern of both propofol preparations. New studies will be needed to confirm these results.
    Critical Care Medicine 12/2000; 28(11):3612-9. · 6.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the study was to investigate whether continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) would facilitate removal of substantial amounts of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) from the circulation in traumatized critically ill patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. The study design was a prospective, nonblind, randomized controlled trial that was set in the trauma intensive care unit of a tertiary university referral hospital. Thirty consecutive critically ill, mechanically ventilated trauma patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (without renal failure) were included in the study. Patients were randomized to either CVVH or conventional treatment. Blood and ultrafiltrate samples were collected from each patient before the initiation of CVVH and after 24, 72, and 168 hours of therapy. In the control group, blood samples were collected during the same periods. In the 30 patients studied, 15 had hemofiltration and 15 did not. Both groups were similar with regard to age (36+/-18 years v 36+/-14 years) and severity scores (injury severity score, 32+/-16 v 30+/-11; APACHE II score, 22+/-7 v 21+/-6; Goris score, 5.2+/-1.7 v 5.2+/-1.8). Before CVVH, TNF and IL-6 could be detected in the serum of all patients. The mean concentration of TNF was 17+/-22 pg/mL in patients and 22+/-20 pg/mL in control subjects (P = NS). The mean concentration of IL-6 was 2,153+/-2,824 pg/mL in patients and 1,774+/-1,637 pg/mL in control subjects (P = NS). We found a TNF and IL-6 substantial elimination with CVVH (excretion of TNF [microg/d] at 24, 48, and 168 hours: 112.6+/-161.2, 105.2+/-149.4, and 143.1+/-170.0; excretion of IL-6 [microg/d]: 1,655+/-719, 3,091+/-489, and 2,420+/-366). However, no significant difference was found in serum cytokines concentration between groups during the study: mean serum TNF concentration decreased from the pretreatment level to a mean level of 12+/-9.6 pg/mL in patients and 21+/-27 pg/mL in control subjects. Similar results were found with IL-6 concentration that decreased from the pretreatment level to a mean of 554+/-731 pg/mL in patients and 382 +/-568 pg/mL in control subjects. In conclusion, CVVH is associated with removal of substantial amounts of TNF and IL-6 from the circulation in traumatized critically ill patients, but the profile of these mediators is similar to that of controls, suggesting a nonclinically relevant elimination. Further prospective, randomized, clinical trials are needed to support our results.
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases 11/1997; 30(4):483-8. · 5.29 Impact Factor