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Publications (9)0 Total impact

  • Maíra Greco de Paula, Simone Diniz Junqueira Barbosa
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    ABSTRACT: Interaction designers and software engineers design interactive systems under different yet complementary perspectives. It is necessary, however, to build bridges between the two areas, so that both professionals may contribute with their own expertise to the quality of the final product. One way to foster this communication is by means of shared representations. This paper presents a qualitative study that investigated the use of a set of HCI design representations as a boundary object to convey to software engineers the interaction design solution in the form of a blueprint of the application’s apparent behavior.
    Task Models and Diagrams for User Interface Design, 6th International Workshop, TAMODIA 2007, Toulouse, France, November 7-9, 2007, Proceedings; 01/2007
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the introduction of human-computer interaction activities in the Corporate IT Department in a large energy company in Brazil. It is certified by ISO 9001:2000, and thus has a set of norms that IT employees must follow during the software development process. We discuss the introduction of HCI activities into these norms.
    Human-Computer Interaction - INTERACT 2007, 11th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, September 10-14, 2007, Proceedings, Part II; 01/2007
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    ABSTRACT: Many design models and representations have been proposed to support user-centered system design, such as scenarios, use cases, and prototypes. With these artifacts, designers typically deal with representations of fragments of the application, and sometimes have difficulties communicating with one another about design decisions. To face some of the communication challenges during design, we believe that we could use a global view of the system's apparent behavior, from the users' point of view. Such a representation would serve as a common reference for HCI designers from different disciplinary backgrounds, helping to foster communication among them. In our goal to promote a shared understanding of the application, we have investigated different professionals' usage of MoLIC, an interaction modeling language that follows an interaction-as-conversation metaphor. MoLIC allows designers to build a blueprint of all the interactions that may take place when the application is used.
    Extended Abstracts Proceedings of the 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2005, Portland, Oregon, USA, April 2-7, 2005; 01/2005
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    ABSTRACT: This paper addresses the challenge of efficiently representing and communicating decisions about human-computer interaction to collaborate with software engineers. It describes and illustrates in a case study how an interaction modeling language based on the semiotic engineering of human-computer interaction may be used to derive a skeleton of certain UML diagrams, namely: use case, class, and sequence diagrams. Our goal is to provide a clear representation of the interactive exchanges that may take place, in order to prevent human-computer interaction decisions to be lost or inadvertently overruled when designing the system architecture and internal functional behavior.
    01/2005;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses the role of an enhanced extended lexicon as a shared communicative artifact during software design. We describe how it may act as an interlingua that captures the shared understanding of both stakeholders and designers. We argue for the need to address communicative concerns among design team members, as well as from designers to users through the user interface. We thus extend an existing lexicon language (LEL) to include communication-oriented concerns that user interface designers need to take into account when representing their solution to end users. We propose that the en- hanced LEL may be used as a valuable resource in model-based design, in modeling the help system, and in engineering the user interface elements and widgets.
    Engineering Human Computer Interaction and Interactive Systems, Joint Working Conferences EHCI-DSVIS 2004, Hamburg, Germany, July 11-13, 2004, Revised Selected Papers; 01/2004
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    Simone Diniz Junqueira Barbosa, Maíra Greco de Paula
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    ABSTRACT: A number of design models have been proposed in the area of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) to support user-centered system design. High-level, abstract task models and detailed interface specification languages are among the most widely used. However, the need for designing applications to run in a number of different devices and platforms presents new issues that must be addressed from a platform-separable perspective. In this paper, we show how an interaction-as-conversation metaphor may face this challenge, and present an interaction modeling language that allows designers to build a blueprint of the range of interactions that will be able to take place in the application. Our goal is twofold: to motivate the designers to reflect upon the interactive solution they are creating, and at the same time provide a skeleton interaction specification that may be easily instantiated for different platforms or devices.
    Interactive Systems. Design, Specification, and Verification, 10th International Workshop, DSV-IS 2003, Funchal, Madeira Island, Portugal, June 11-13, 2003, Revised Papers; 01/2003
  • Simone Diniz Junqueira Barbosa, Maíra Greco de Paula
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    ABSTRACT: This paper proposes the use of an interaction modeling language called MoLIC to graphically represent scenarios as an additional resource in software development. MoLIC brings human-computer interaction (HCI) concerns to software engineering processes. It does so by representing potential user- system interaction paths, which will not only allow software designers to make decisions about the HCI aspects of software, but also provide a blueprint — from the users' point of view — of what needs to be implemented and tested, and how users should perceive it. Using MoLIC as an input artifact, software engineering techniques may be used to decide how to build the software that will make it possible for the represented interaction to happen. As such, MoLIC provides a basis not only for communication and understanding among team members, but also as a concrete resource for software design and development.
    Proceedings of ICSE 2003 Workshop on Bridging the Gaps Between Software Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction, May 3-4, 2003, Portland, Oregon, USA; 01/2003
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    Maíra Greco De Paula, Simone Diniz, Junqueira Barbosa
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    ABSTRACT: RESUMO Diversas representações de design têm sido propostas na área de Interação Humano-Computador (IHC) para apoiar o design centrado no usuário. Modelos de tarefa em um alto nível de abstração e linguagens de especificação detalhada da interface de usuário estão entre os mais utilizados. Jä cenários e storyboards são representações comumente utilizadas para promover a comunicação numa equipe de design. Entretanto, estas representações não provêem uma visão global da solução, i.e., o comportamento aparente da aplicação do ponto de vista do usuário. Este artigo argumenta que tal visão global é importante e funciona como um blueprint da aplicação, que permite que profissionais formados em diferentes disciplinas compartilhem a mesma compreensão da essência da aplicação. Argumenta ainda que a adoção da metáfora de interação como uma conversa pode fazer face a este desafio. Para possibilitar isto, apresenta uma linguagem de modelagem de interação que permite que os designers construam um blueprint do conjunto de interações que poderão ocorrer durante o uso da aplicação. ABSTRACT A number of design models and representations have been proposed in the area of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) to support user-centered system design. High-level, abstract task models and detailed interface specification languages are among the most widely used. Scenarios and storyboards are among the most common representations used for communication in multidisciplinary design teams. However, they don't give a global view of the solution, i.e., the application's apparent behavior from the users' point of view. We argue that such a global view is important and serves as a blueprint of the application that allows professionals from multidisciplinary backgrounds to share the same understanding of the essence of the application. In this paper, we argue that an interaction-as-conversation metaphor may face this challenge, and present an interaction modeling language that allows designers to build a blueprint of the range of interactions that will possibly take place when the application is used.
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    Maíra Greco De Paula, Simone D J Barbosa, Carlos José, P De Lucena
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    ABSTRACT: The UML suite of modeling languages fails to properly model the human-computer interaction. On the other hand, newly conceived HCI modeling languages need to foresee their role as members of the family of languages that constitute the UML representations for software design, due to their wide acceptance by both researchers and practitioners. MoLIC, our proposed HCI modeling language, seems to be a natural family member since many consistency checks seem to be possible between MoLIC and other software design notations used in UML. MoLIC is based on Semiotic Engineering and represents interaction as threads of conversation users may have with the system.