Rebecca E. Grinter

Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

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Publications (111)13.5 Total impact

  • Andrea G. Parker, Rebecca E. Grinter
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    ABSTRACT: Human–Computer Interaction (HCI) researchers are increasingly examining how Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can help people eat more healthfully. However, within HCI, there has been little examination of the way that cultural values influence how people think about food and wellness, and how sociocultural context supports or impedes attempts to eat healthfully. Our work focuses on the diet-related health challenges of African Americans within low-income neighborhoods. This population disproportionately experiences diet-related disease, and as such, researchers have consistently advocated research that examines the way in which food practices are culturally situated. Through formative focus groups with 46 participants we identified several design implications for tools that promote healthy eating while accounting for collectivism, a cultural value often ascribed to the African American population. Based on our design implications we developed, deployed and evaluated two systems that supported the sharing of community-held knowledge about making healthy eating decisions. In our discussion, we present implications for the design of collectivistic systems that address food practices. We conclude with recommendations for HCI research that investigates the relationship between culture and food more broadly.
    International Journal of Human-Computer Studies 01/2014; 72(2):185–206. · 1.42 Impact Factor
  • Ellen W. Zegura, Rebecca E. Grinter
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    ABSTRACT: Technology hubs---labs committed to fostering local technology and entrepreneurship communities---are newcomers in local African ICT ecosystems. While research has focused on the organizational structure of labs, the degree to which they fuel start ups, and surrounding institutional contexts in which they operate, less is understood about how each operates as a Community of Practice (CoP) from social learning theory. And yet, the creation of such a community of practice seems central to building local ICT capacity. Drawing on data from Liberia's iLab, we describe how it functions as a CoP and identify some next steps for supporting its community.
    Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Information and Communications Technologies and Development: Notes - Volume 2; 12/2013
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    ABSTRACT: Link for paper here http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2491501
    ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 07/2013; 20:13:1-13:4. · 1.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We are proposing a SIG designed for Human-Computer Interaction for Development (HCI4D) Community. It is designed to foster further collaboration, dissemination of research results and findings from practitioners, as well as to promote discussion of how we can both learn from each other and from those we serve in underserved communities wherever they may be.
    CHI '13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems; 04/2013
  • Deana Brown, Rebecca E. Grinter
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    ABSTRACT: Migration of parents, in pursuit of 'a better life', has deep roots in Caribbean history and culture. However, the separation from children that results means that care gets provided through a transnational network of caregivers and devices. In this paper we describe how mobile phones in particular have entered a complex care network and while they support some communications they have also contributed to many of the difficulties associated with migration. On the basis of our observations, we conclude with a call for future Ubicomp research into family communication to look to support parenting by considering caregiving networks as wider than just the family. Moreover, this study contributes to our thinking about what 'more' means when introducing additional technologies in family and care networks and their ability to reinforce or shift power structures in the networks in which they are embedded.
    Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing; 09/2012
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    ABSTRACT: As HCI researchers have designed tools to promote wellness, disease has often been approached as a general problem. In contrast, public health research argues for an activist approach focused on how certain groups disproportionately experience disease and eliminating these disparities. Taking this activist stance, we examine how technology can reduce health inequalities by disrupting power relationships and helping communities pursue social change. We discuss our tool, Community Mosaic (CM), which allows individuals to share their healthy eating ideas with one another as a means of advocating behavior change. Our results characterize how CM helped facilitate activism (i.e., collective efforts to counter local challenges to healthy living) and shift users' attitudes regarding their role as advocates for health. We contribute to the field of HCI by using our findings to present a set of recommendations for future research focused on designing and evaluating health promotion tools using an activist lens.
    01/2012;
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    Susan Wyche, Rebecca E. Grinter
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    ABSTRACT: Although computer-mediated family communication remains a longstanding focus of study in Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), families who face challenges in communication due to differences in technology infrastructures remain understudied. To address this gap in the literature, we interviewed 39 Kenyan migrants living in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. who regularly communicate with friends and family members living in their homeland. The contributions of this work are primarily empirical. Findings from our study reveal how high costs, identity management, and infrastructural differences between rural and urban areas in Kenya, impact decisions families and their extended members make when using information and communication technology (ICT). We present design implications and reflect on how understanding Kenyan migrants' ICT practices can positively influence design for the broader population.
    CSCW '12 Computer Supported Cooperative Work, Seattle, WA, USA, February 11-15, 2012; 01/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Bandwidth caps, a limit on the amount of data users can upload and download in a month, are common globally for both home and mobile Internet access. With caps, each bit of data consumed comes at a cost against a monthly quota or a running tab. Yet, relatively little work has considered the implications of this usage-based pricing model on the user experience. In this paper, we present results from a qualitative study of households living with bandwidth caps. Our findings suggest home users grapple with three uncertainties regarding their bandwidth usage: invisible balances, mysterious processes, and multiple users. We discuss how these uncertainties impact their usage and describe the potential for better tools to help monitor and manage data caps. We conclude that as a community we need to cater for users under Internet cost constraints.
    01/2012;
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    Susan Wyche, Rebecca E. Grinter
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we contribute to the community's understanding about the relationship between religion and technology use. Simultaneously, we demonstrate how sketching supports the creative design process in novel ways. We describe how we used sketching to translate findings from our fieldwork examining Charismatic Pentecostals and technology use in São Paulo, Brazil, into conceptual design concepts. We then presented these sketches to the participants who motivated and inspired the ideas depicted in the drawings. Findings from these interviews suggest that sketching can be used to uncover value differences between users and designers, highlight promising design ideas, and validate qualitative research findings. We conclude with a discussion describing how our use of sketching illustrates the intellectual rigor involved in design research.
    iConference 2012, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, February 7-10, 2012; 01/2012
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    Andrea Grimes Parker, Richard Harper, Rebecca E Grinter
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    ABSTRACT: There are numerous everyday health technologies (applications designed for people to use in their daily lives) that promote healthy eating habits. From educational games to monitoring applications, these systems often take a corrective approach in that they are designed to fix the problematic aspects of people's interactions with, and thoughts about, food. We propose a complementary approach, termed celebratory health technology design, in which systems promote healthy eating by highlighting positive food interactions, meanings, and values. We present a case study from our research to show the benefit and feasibility of designing celebratory health applications. Our goal is to encourage a more comprehensive approach to everyday health technology design, one that encompasses not only corrective systems, but celebratory applications as well.
    Journal of diabetes science and technology 01/2011; 5(2):319-24.
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    ABSTRACT: As Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) have entered homes and more, so Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) research has expanded to examine new motivations for coordination and communications. Recently this has grown to include a focus on religion. But, yet, while the uses of ICTs by practitioners of a variety of faiths have been examined, far less is known about how officials within religious institutions adopt, use and reject ICTs. In this paper, we report findings from a study of American Protestant Christian ministers’ use of ICTs. We present findings and discuss the use of systems in church management, worship, pastoral care, and outreach, and the challenges in integrating ICTs into religious practice. Despite these difficulties, we found that ministers, chose to experiment with ICTs because of their ability to sustain, reinforce and grow their church (laity and ministry collectively) community.
    Computer Supported Cooperative Work 01/2011; 20:449-472. · 0.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This workshop is aimed at exploring the issues at the intersection of feminist thinking and human computer interaction. Both feminism and HCI have made important contributions to social science in the past several decades, but though their potential for overlap seem high, they have not engaged each other directly until recently. In this workshop we will explore diverse--and contentious--ways that feminist perspectives can support user research, design ideation and problem framing, sketching and prototyping, and design criticism and evaluation. The workshop will include fast-moving mini-panels and hands-on group exercises emphasizing feminist interaction criticism and design ideation.
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2011, Extended Abstracts Volume, Vancouver, BC, Canada, May 7-12, 2011; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: This forum looks at how the fields of interaction design and HCI can extend to cover "developing" communities around the world, ones that are gaining access to digital technology for the first time. Gary Marsden, Editor | gaz@acm.org
    Interactions. 01/2011; 18(2):72-75.
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    ABSTRACT: The experience of interacting with a robot has been shown to be very different in comparison to people’s interaction experience with other technologies and artifacts, and often has a strong social or emotional component—a difference that poses potential challenges related to the design and evaluation of HRI. In this paper we explore this difference, and its implications on evaluating HRI. We outline how this difference is due in part to the general complexity of robots’ overall context of interaction, related to their dynamic presence in the real world and their tendency to invoke a sense of agency.We suggest that due to these differences HCI evaluation methods should be applied to HRI with care, and we present a survey of select HCI evaluation techniques from the perspective of the unique challenges of robots. We propose a view on social interaction with robots that we call the holistic interaction experience, and introduce a set of three perspectives for exploring social interaction with robots: visceral factors of interaction, social mechanics, and social structures. We demonstrate how our three perspectives can be used in practice, both as guidelines to discuss and categorize robot interaction, and as a component in the evaluation process. Further, we propose an original heuristic for brainstorming various possibilities of interaction experiences based on a concept we call the interaction experience map.
    International Journal of Social Robotics 01/2011; 3:53-67.
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    ABSTRACT: With widespread broadband adoption, more households report experiencing sub-optimal speeds. Not only are slow speeds frustrating, they may indicate consumers are not receiving the services they are paying for from their internet service providers. Yet, determining the speed and source of slow-downs is difficult because few tools exist for broadband management. We report on results of a field trial with 10 households using a visual network probe designed to address these problems. We describe the results of the study and provide design implications for future tools. More importantly, we argue that tools like this can educate and empower consumers by making broadband speeds and sources of slow-downs more visible.
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2011, Vancouver, BC, Canada, May 7-12, 2011; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: In managing and troubleshooting home networks, one of the challenges is in knowing what is actually happening. Availability of a record of events that occurred on the home network before trouble appeared would go a long way toward addressing that challenge. In this position/work-in-progress paper, we consider requirements for a general-purpose logging facility for home networks. Such a facility, if properly designed, would potentially have other uses. We describe several such uses and discuss requirements to be considered in the design of a logging platform that would be widely supported and accepted. We also report on our initial deployment of such a facility.
    Computer Communication Review. 01/2011; 41:84-89.
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    ABSTRACT: Before building the network or its components, first understand the home and the behavior of its human inhabitants.
    Commun. ACM. 01/2011; 54:62-71.
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    ABSTRACT: When purchasing home broadband access from Internet service providers (ISPs), users must decide which service plans are most appropriate for their needs. Today, ISPs advertise their available service plans using only generic upload and download speeds. Un-fortunately, these metrics do not always accurately reflect the vary-ing performance that home users will experience for a wide range of applications. In this paper, we propose that each ISP service plan carry a "nutrition label" that conveys more comprehensive informa-tion about network metrics along many dimensions, including vari-ous aspects of throughput, latency, loss rate, and jitter. We first jus-tify why these metrics should form the basis of a network nutrition label. Then, we demonstrate that current plans that are superficially similar with respect to advertised download rates may have differ-ent performance according to the label metrics. We close with a discussion of the challenges involved in presenting a nutrition label to users in a way that is both accurate and easy to understand.
    01/2011;
  • Rebecca E. Grinter, Katie A. Siek, Andrea Grimes
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    ABSTRACT: (Does it bother anyone that design continues to be driven by awful marketing techniques?)
    Interactions. 01/2010; 17:76-79.
  • Rebecca E. Grinter, Katie A. Siek, Andrea Grimes
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    ABSTRACT: The last decade has seen a large explosion of health-related human centered computing research and practice focused on wellness (e.g., good nutrition and exercise promotion) with the intention of helping people avoid needing medical care. And while Health Informatics may appear to be the obvious home for these activities, it is a discipline that has focused on the design, development, and evaluation of systems to process healthcare data and through that aid in patient treatment. Given the ubiquity of wellness systems we think its time to create a Wellness Informatics community. The goal of the workshop is to identify the themes and grand challenges for designing and evaluating Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) that help people stay well.
    Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2010, Extended Abstracts Volume, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, April 10-15, 2010; 01/2010

Publication Stats

4k Citations
13.50 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004–2014
    • Georgia Institute of Technology
      • • School of Interactive Computing
      • • College of Computing
      Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • 2011
    • The University of Tokyo
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2003–2005
    • Palo Alto Research Center
      Palo Alto, California, United States
  • 1997–1999
    • Alcatel Lucent
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1998
    • AT&T Labs
      Austin, Texas, United States
  • 1994–1996
    • University of California, Irvine
      • Department of Informatics
      Irvine, California, United States