H. Brisse

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, Burdeos, Aquitaine, France

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Publications (68)47.14 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Wilms Tumor (WT) can occur in association with tumor predisposition syndromes and/or with clinical malformations. These associations have not been fully characterized at a clinical and molecular genetic level. This study aims to describe clinical malformations, genetic abnormalities, and tumor predisposition syndromes in patients with WT and to propose guidelines regarding indications for clinical and molecular genetic explorations. This retrospective study analyzed clinical abnormalities and predisposition syndromes among 295 patients treated for WT between 1986 and 2009 in a single pediatric oncological center. Clinically identified malformations and predisposition syndromes were observed in 52/295 patients (17.6%). Genetically proven tumor predisposition syndromes (n = 14) frequently observed were syndromes associated with alterations of the chromosome WT1 region such as WAGR (n = 6) and Denys-Drash syndromes (n = 3), syndromes associated with alterations of the WT2 region (Beckwith-Wiedeman syndrome, n = 3), and Fanconi anemia (n = 2). Hemihypertrophy and genito-urinary malformations (n = 12 and n = 16, respectively) were the most frequently identified malformations. Other different syndromes or malformations (n = 10) were less frequent. Median age of WT diagnosis was significantly earlier for children with malformations than those without (27 months vs. 37 months, P = 0.0009). There was no significant difference in terms of 5-year EFS and OS between WT patients without or with malformations. The frequency of malformations observed in patients with WT underline the need of genetic counseling and molecular genetic explorations for a better follow-up of these patients, with a frequently good outcome. A decisional tree, based on clinical observations of patients with WT, is proposed to guide clinicians for further molecular genetic explorations. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 08/2013; · 2.35 Impact Factor
  • N. Pierrat, S. Lasalle, H. Brisse
    Physica Medica - PHYS MEDICA. 01/2011; 27.
  • Energy Economics - ENERG ECON. 01/2011; 59.
  • J-F Chateil, B Aubert, H Brisse
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    ABSTRACT: Radiologists should be able to appreciate the radiation dose delivered to patients for routine diagnostic procedures. The radiology report should include data necessary to calculate the patient dose in Gray. Using the effective dose, it is possible to compare with other source of radiation exposure. Simple formulas, taking into account different anatomical regions, derived from dose-area product (conventional radiography) or dose-length product (CT) are provided to calculate the effective dose in Sievert. For conventional (non-interventional) radiography, the effective dose for a given exam is inferior or equal to the yearly background radiation. For CT, the effective dose corresponds to 1 to 10 years of yearly background radiation.
    Journal de Radiologie 11/2010; 91(11 Pt 2):1192-8; quiz 1199-200. · 0.35 Impact Factor
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    J.-F. Chateil, B. Aubert, H. Brisse
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    ABSTRACT: Radiologists should be able to appreciate the radiation dose delivered to patients for routine diagnostic procedures. The radiology report should include data necessary to calculate the patient dose in Gray. Using the effective dose, it is possible to compare with other source of radiation exposure. Simple formulas, taking into account different anatomical regions, derived from dose-area product (conventional radiography) or dose-length product (CT) are provided to calculate the effective dose in Sievert. For conventional (non-interventional) radiography, the effective dose for a given exam is inferior or equal to the yearly background radiation. For CT, the effective dose corresponds to 1 to 10 years of yearly background radiation.
    Journal De Radiologie - J RADIOL. 01/2010; 91(11):1192-1200.
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    ABSTRACT: Diagnosis of choroidal hematoma, either spontaneous or associated with age-related macular degeneration, is clinical. In some cases of expansive or posterior lesion, hematoma may be misdiagnosed as a tumor. MRI and color Doppler imaging (CDI) are important in ruling out uveal melanoma in these cases. We reviewed the clinical, MRI, and ultrasonographic characteristics of 95 patients sent to the Curie Institute for suspected uveal melanoma between 1998 and 2006, whose final diagnosis was a choroidal hematoma. Imaging differences with melanomas are discussed. A total of 95 patients with a diagnosis of hematoma were seen; the age varied from 54 to 92 years with a median age of 77 years; there was a history of macular degeneration in 27 cases and 11 patients were taking an anticoagulant. Intravitreous hemorrhage was noted in 18 cases and the lesion was located in the posterior pole in 28 cases. The thickness of the lesions measured by B scan ultrasonography varied between 1 and 7.8mm, with a mean thickness of 2.86mm. MRI was performed in 27 cases and CDI in ten cases. On CDI, hematomas appeared as linear or regular bulging lesions with no intralesional blood flow. On MRI, hematomas appeared as a high-intensity signal on T1-weighted images, heterogeneous on T2-weigted images in relation to the progression of the clot, but no contrast enhancement was noted inside the lesion. Follow-up examinations showed the progressive involvement of the clot and delayed decreasing size of the lesion. The diagnosis of choroidal hematoma is usually made by fundus examination. In some posterior locations with pseudo-tumoral appearance, CDI and MRI are useful to rule out a uveal tumor.
    Journal francais d'ophtalmologie 10/2009; 32(9):621-8. · 0.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Diagnosis of choroidal hematoma, either spontaneous or associated with age-related macular degeneration, is clinical. In some cases of expansive or posterior lesion, hematoma may be misdiagnosed as a tumor. MRI and color Doppler imaging (CDI) are important in ruling out uveal melanoma in these cases. Patients and methods We reviewed the clinical, MRI, and ultrasonographic characteristics of 95 patients sent to the Curie Institute for suspected uveal melanoma between 1998 and 2006, whose final diagnosis was a choroidal hematoma. Imaging differences with melanomas are discussed. Results A total of 95 patients with a diagnosis of hematoma were seen; the age varied from 54 to 92 years with a median age of 77 years; there was a history of macular degeneration in 27 cases and 11 patients were taking an anticoagulant. Intravitreous hemorrhage was noted in 18 cases and the lesion was located in the posterior pole in 28 cases. The thickness of the lesions measured by B scan ultrasonography varied between 1 and 7.8 mm, with a mean thickness of 2.86 mm. MRI was performed in 27 cases and CDI in ten cases. On CDI, hematomas appeared as linear or regular bulging lesions with no intralesional blood flow. On MRI, hematomas appeared as a high-intensity signal on T1-weighted images, heterogeneous on T2-weigted images in relation to the progression of the clot, but no contrast enhancement was noted inside the lesion. Follow-up examinations showed the progressive involvement of the clot and delayed decreasing size of the lesion. Conclusion The diagnosis of choroidal hematoma is usually made by fundus examination. In some posterior locations with pseudo-tumoral appearance, CDI and MRI are useful to rule out a uveal tumor.
    Journal Francais D Ophtalmologie - J FR OPHTALMOL. 01/2009; 32(9):621-628.
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    ABSTRACT: Medulloblastoma patients treated at the Institute Curie between 1980 and 2000 were reviewed. Only patients whose primary treatment included craniospinal radiation were considered. Surviving patients were identified and evaluated by means of self-report questionnaires using the Health Utility Index (HUI). Psychosocial functioning, employment, and other health-related indicators were recorded. Seventy-three patients were treated during the study period. At a median follow-up from diagnosis of 14.4 years, 49 patients were alive and 45 surviving patients could be contacted. Late sequelae were frequent, particularly neurological deficits (71%) and endocrine complications (52%). Impairments of psychosocial functioning, including employment, driving capacity, independent living, and marital status, were identified in most patients. Most long-term medulloblastoma survivors suffer persistent deficits in several domains, with a significant impact on their psychosocial functioning. These findings reinforce the importance of early intervention programs for all survivors in order to reduce the psychosocial impacts of their disease.
    Journal of Neuro-Oncology 01/2009; 95(2):271-279. · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: All components of the sacrum (bone, cartilage, bone marrow, meninges, nerves, notochord remnants, etc.) can give rise to benign or malignant tumours. Bone metastases and intraosseous sites of haematological malignancies, lymphoma and multiple myeloma are the most frequent aetiologies, while primary bone tumours and meningeal or nerve tumours are less common. Some histological types have a predilection for the sacrum, especially chordoma and giant cell tumour. Clinical signs are usually minor, and sacral tumours are often discovered in the context of nerve root or pelvic organ compression. The roles of conventional radiology, CT and MRI are described and compared with the histological features of the main tumours. The impact of imaging on treatment decisions and follow-up is also reviewed.
    Skeletal Radiology 05/2008; 37(4):277-89. · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Detail the most frequent problems encountered in the differential diagnosis of retinoblastoma. and method: We conducted a retrospective study on the children referred to the Curie Institute for suspicion of retinoblastoma between 2000 and 2006. Diagnosis was made by fundus examination using the indirect ophthalmoscope, ultrasonography, and MRI. Of the 486 children seen during this period, 408 had unilateral or bilateral retinoblastoma and 78 (16%) had another lesion: Coats disease (20 children, 25%), congenital malformations (23 children, 30%; coloboma, PHPV, microphthalmia, isolated or associated with retinal dysplasia), other tumors (10 children, 13%; astrocytomas and medulloepithelioma), combined hamartomas (six children, 8%), inflammatory diseases (six children, 8%) (Toxocara canis, cat scratch eye disease, or toxoplasmosis), and other diseases (13 children, 16%; corneal opacities, congenital cataract, or retinal detachment). Compared to previous series, this study shows the proportion of erroneous diagnosis has lowered (16%) compared to earlier studies by Balmer (1986; 30%), and Shields (1991; 42%). No cases of retinopathy of prematurity were seen in our series, demonstrating that screening is good or of a lower frequency in France. The frequency of PHPV has dropped. Coats disease remains a frequent and sometimes difficult diagnosis to make, particularly in advanced stages of the disease.
    Journal francais d'ophtalmologie 03/2008; 31(2):165-72. · 0.51 Impact Factor
  • Archives De Pediatrie - ARCHIVES PEDIATRIE. 01/2008; 15(5):926-927.
  • J. F. Chateil, H. Brisse
    Journal De Radiologie - J RADIOL. 01/2008; 89(10):1278-1278.
  • Archives De Pediatrie - ARCHIVES PEDIATRIE. 01/2008; 15(5):904-904.
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    ABSTRACT: Objectif : Préciser les problèmes les plus fréquents de diagnostic différentiel du rétinoblastome. Patients et méthode : Nous avons réalisé une étude rétrospective des enfants adressés entre 2000 et 2006 à l’Institut Curie pour suspicion de rétinoblastome. Le diagnostic a été établi par l’examen du fond d’œil à l’ophtalmoscope binoculaire, l’échographie et l’IRM. Résultats : Sur les 486 enfants examinés pendant cette période, 408 enfants présentaient un rétinoblastome, et 78 enfants, (16 %) une autre pathologie : maladie de Coats (20 enfants, 25 %), pathologies malformatives (23 enfants, 30 %) (colobome, persistance du vitré primitif, microphtalmie isolée ou associée à une dysplasie rétinovitréenne), pathologie tumorale autre (10 enfants, 13 %) (astrocytome et médulloépithéliome), hamartome combiné (6 enfants, 8 %), pathologies inflammatoires (6 enfants, 8 %) (infection à Toxocara canis, maladie des griffes du chat, toxoplasmose), et autres pathologies (13 enfants, 16 %) (cataracte congénitale, pathologies cornéennes, décollements de rétine). Discussion : Cette étude montre une diminution de la fréquence des diagnostics erronés (16 %) par rapport aux séries antérieures de Balmer (30 %, 1986) et de Shields (42 %, 1991). Aucun cas de rétinopathie du prématuré n’a été constaté dans notre série, témoignant d’un bon dépistage ou de la fréquence moindre de cette pathologie en France. La fréquence de la persistance du vitré primitif a diminué. La maladie de Coats reste en revanche un piège diagnostique, surtout lors des stades avancés de la maladie.
    Journal Francais D Ophtalmologie - J FR OPHTALMOL. 01/2008; 31(2):165-172.
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    ABSTRACT: Objectifs L’utilisation du scanner en pédiatrie pose la question du risque de cancer radio-induit à long terme. En collaboration avec la SFIPP, la faisabilité de la mise en place d’une cohorte d’enfants exposés a été testée. Matériels et méthodes Dans 13 services de radiologie pédiatrique, des données démographiques et d’exposition (région anatomique examinée, protocole dosimétrique du service) ont été recueillies pour les enfants soumis à un scanner avant l’âge de 5 ans entre 2000 et 2006. Résultats La cohorte comporte 30 000 enfants avec un âge au premier scanner de moins d’ 1 an pour 42 % d’entre eux, de 1 à 2 ans pour 19 %, puis 13 % pour chaque classe d’âge d’un an, jusqu’à 5 ans. Le nombre moyen d’examens par enfant est de 1,5 (1 à 33) et ceux-ci concernent pour 66 % le crâne, 22 % le thorax, 10 % l’abdomen et le pelvis, et enfin pour 2 % d’autres localisations. Conclusion Cette étude montre qu’il est possible de mettre en place une cohorte d’enfants soumis à un scanner en France. L’évaluation du risque de cancer à long terme sera basée sur l’incidence de cancer jusqu’à 15 ans via les registres pédiatriques de cancer et sur la mortalité pour le suivi ultérieur.
    Journal De Radiologie - J RADIOL. 01/2008; 89(10):1222-1222.
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    H. Brisse, B. Aubert
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    ABSTRACT: Objectifs Réévaluer les niveaux actuels d’exposition en TDM pédiatrique afin de contribuer à l’établissement des niveaux de référence diagnostiques. Matériels et méthodes Fin 2007, les membres de la SFIPP ont reçu une fiche de recueil incluant la dose absorbée (CTDIvol16/tête et cou, CTDIvol32/tronc et membres) pour trois âges types (1,5 et 10 ans) et des indications types sur huit régions anatomiques (crâne, massif facial, sinus, rochers, thorax, poumon « basse dose », abdomen-pelvis et os). Résultats L’analyse a porté sur 20 sites hospitaliers. Pour les âges de 1,5 et 10 ans respectivement, les 75èmes centiles des distributions de doses étaient de : 34,41 et 50 mGy pour le crâne ; 24,22 et 24 mGy pour le massif facial ; Il, Il et 11 mGy pour les sinus ; 48,71 et 85 mGy pour les rochers ; 3,3, 5 et 6 mGy pour le thorax ; 2,3 et 4 mGy pour le poumon « basse dose » ; 4,5 et 7 mGy pour l’abdomen-pelvis ; et 7,11 et 13 mGy pour l’os. Conclusion Comparativement au guide des procédures (2005), les valeurs sont légèrement supérieures pour le crâne, les sinus et les rochers. Les écarts dosimétriques inter-centres restent élevés.
    Journal De Radiologie - J RADIOL. 01/2008; 89(10):1222-1222.
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    ABSTRACT: Whereas neuroblastoma (NB) with MYCN amplification presents a poor prognosis, no single marker allows to reliably predict outcome in tumours without MYCN amplification. We report here an extensive analysis of 147 NB samples at diagnosis, without MYCN amplification, by chromosomal comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH), providing a comprehensive overview of their genomic imbalances. Comparative genomic hybridisation profiles showed gains or losses of entire chromosomes (type 1) in 71 cases, whereas partial chromosome gains or losses (type 2), including gain involving 17q were observed in 68 cases. Atypical profiles were present in eight cases. A type 1 profile was observed more frequently in localised disease (P<0.0001), and in patients of less than 12 months at diagnosis (P<0.0001). A type 2 genomic profile was associated with a higher risk of relapse in the overall population (log-rank test; P<0.0001), but also in the subgroup of patients with localised disease (log-rank test, P=0.007). In multivariate analysis, the genomic profile was the strongest independent prognostic factor. In conclusion, the genomic profile is of prognostic impact in patients without MYCN amplification, making it a help in the management of low-stage NB. Further studies using higher-resolution CGH are needed to better characterise atypical genomic alterations.
    British Journal of Cancer 08/2007; 97(2):238-46. · 5.08 Impact Factor
  • Journal de Radiologie 04/2007; 88(3 Pt 1):411-4. · 0.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging is frequently requested in Oncology. Radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians are often asked to perform a panel of imaging examinations as part of the initial staging or follow-up of cancer patients. Medical imaging must therefore integrate polyvalent skills enabling imaging specialists to understand and interpret all types of images. In this context, PET imaging combined with non-enhanced CT, and diagnostic quality contrast-enhanced CT scan and optimisation of CT settings, is part of this multidisciplinary approach requiring the specific skills of a radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician. This approach must therefore be conducted in both directions: radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians should both know how to correlate PET and CT images, while preserving the specificities of each discipline. Radiologists need to be aware of several aspects of PET imaging: PET technology, the examination procedure and injection of iodinated contrast agent for high quality diagnostic CT, ideally followed by double interpretation of CT images, PET images and fused images. Radiologists should be familiar with PET imaging, as this procedure may be associated with several pitfalls and artefacts that need interpretation by a trained specialist. The authors analyse the examination technique of PET combined with non-enhanced and/or contrast-enhanced CT and the proposals for optimal interpretation of normal or pathological PET/CT fusion images.
    Cancer Imaging 02/2007; 7 Spec No A:S95-9. · 1.59 Impact Factor
  • Journal De Radiologie - J RADIOL. 01/2007; 88(10):1322-1322.

Publication Stats

521 Citations
47.14 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux
      Burdeos, Aquitaine, France
  • 2000–2009
    • Institut Curie
      • Service de Radiothérapie
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2002–2006
    • Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy
      • Department of Radiotherapy
      Île-de-France, France
  • 2004
    • Hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul – Hôpitaux universitaires Paris Centre
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 1996–1998
    • Hôpital Universitaire Robert Debré
      • Service d’Imagerie Pédiatrique
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France