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Publications (18)2.58 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Reuse of existing presentation materials is prevalent among knowledge workers. However, finding the most appropriate material for reuse is challenging. Existing information management and search tools provide inadequate support for reuse due to their dependence on users' ability to effectively categorize, recall, and recognize existing materials. Based on our findings from an online survey and contextual interviews, we designed and implemented a slide-based contextual recommender, ConReP, for supporting reuse of presentation materials. ConReP utilizes a user-selected slide as a search-key, recommends materials based on similarity to the selected slide, and provides a local-context-based visual representation of the recommendations. Users input provides new insight into presentation reuse and reveals that slide-based search is more effective than keyword-based search, local-context-based visual representation helps in better recall and recognition, and shows the promise of this general approach of exploiting individual slides and local-context for better presentation reuse.
    02/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: This work aims at discovering community structure in rich media social networks through analysis of time-varying, multirelational data. Community structure represents the latent social context of user actions. It has important applications such as search and recommendation. The problem is particularly useful in the enterprise domain, where extracting emergent community structure on enterprise social media can help in forming new collaborative teams, in expertise discovery, and in the long term reorganization of enterprises based on collaboration patterns. There are several unique challenges: (a) In social media, the context of user actions is constantly changing and coevolving; hence the social context contains time-evolving multidimensional relations. (b) The social context is determined by the available system features and is unique in each social media platform; hence the analysis of such data needs to flexibly incorporate various system features. In this article we propose MetaFac (MetaGraph Factorization), a framework that extracts community structures from dynamic, multidimensional social contexts and interactions. Our work has three key contributions: (1) metagraph, a novel relational hypergraph representation for modeling multirelational and multidimensional social data; (2) an efficient multirelational factorization method for community extraction on a given metagraph; (3) an online method to handle time-varying relations through incremental metagraph factorization. Extensive experiments on real-world social data collected from an enterprise and the public Digg social media Web site suggest that our technique is scalable and is able to extract meaningful communities from social media contexts. We illustrate the usefulness of our framework through two prediction tasks: (1) in the enterprise dataset, the task is to predict users’ future interests on tag usage, and (2) in the Digg dataset, the task is to predict users’ future interests in voting and commenting on Digg stories. Our prediction significantly outperforms baseline methods (including aspect model and tensor analysis), indicating the promising direction of using metagraphs for handling time-varying social relational contexts.
    TKDD. 01/2011; 5:17.
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    ABSTRACT: Diversified ranking on graphs is a fundamental mining task and has a variety of high-impact applications. There are two important open questions here. The first challenge is the measure - how to quantify the goodness of a given top-k ranking list that captures both the relevance and the diversity? The second challenge lies in the algorithmic aspect - how to find an optimal, or near-optimal, top-k ranking list that maximizes the measure we defined in a scalable way? In this paper, we address these challenges from an optimization point of view. Firstly, we propose a goodness measure for a given top-k ranking list. The proposed goodness measure intuitively captures both (a) the relevance between each individual node in the ranking list and the query; and (b) the diversity among different nodes in the ranking list. Moreover, we propose a scalable algorithm (linear wrt the size of the graph) that generates a provably near-optimal solution. The experimental evaluations on real graphs demonstrate its effectiveness and efficiency.
    Proceedings of the 17th ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, San Diego, CA, USA, August 21-24, 2011; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: Presentation material is a commonly-performed task. Yet current tools provide inadequate support - search tools are unable to return individual slides, and the linear model employed by presentation creation tools lacks structure and context. We propose a novel method for presentation creation, implemented in a tool called Outline Wizard, which enables outline-based composition and search. An Outline Wizard user enters a hierarchically-structured outline of a presentation; using that structure, the tool extracts user requests to formulate contextual queries, matches them against presentations within a repository, taking into account both content and structures of the presentations, and presents the user with sets of slides that are appropriate for each outline topic. At the heart of Outline Wizard is an outline-based search technique, which conducts content search within the context derived from the hierarchical structures of both user requests and presentations. We present a heuristic outline-extraction technique, which is used to reverse engineer the structures of presentations, thereby making the structures available for our search engine. Evaluations show that the outline extraction technique and outline-based search both perform well, and that users report a satisfying experience when using Outline Wizard to compose presentations from libraries of existing material.
    Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces, February 7-10, 2010, Hong Kong, China; 01/2010
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    ABSTRACT: This paper aims at discovering community structure in rich media social networks, through analysis of time-varying, multi-relational data. Community structure represents the latent social context of user actions. It has important applications in information tasks such as search and recommendation. Social media has several unique challenges. (a) In social media, the context of user actions is constantly changing and co-evolving; hence the social context contains time-evolving multi-dimensional relations. (b) The social context is determined by the available system features and is unique in each social media website. In this paper we propose MetaFac (MetaGraph Factorization), a framework that extracts community structures from various social contexts and interactions. Our work has three key contributions: (1) metagraph, a novel relational hypergraph representation for modeling multi- relational and multi-dimensional social data; (2) an efficient factorization method for community extraction on a given metagraph; (3) an on-line method to handle time-varying relations through incremental metagraph factorization. Extensive experiments on real-world social data collected from the Digg social media website suggest that our technique is scalable and is able to extract meaningful communities based on the social media contexts. We illustrate the usefulness of our framework through prediction tasks. We outperform baseline methods (including aspect model and tensor analysis) by an order of magnitude.
    Proceedings of the 15th ACM SIGKDD International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, Paris, France, June 28 - July 1, 2009; 01/2009
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    ABSTRACT: Social media websites promote diverse user interaction on media objects as well as user actions with respect to other users. The goal of this work is to discover community structure in rich media social networks, and observe how it evolves over time, through analysis of multi-relational data. The problem is important in the enterprise domain where extracting emergent community structure on enterprise social media, can help in forming new collaborative teams, aid in expertise discovery, and guide long term enterprise reorganization. Our approach consists of three main parts: (1) a relational hypergraph model for modeling various social context and interactions; (2) a novel hypergraph factorization method for community extraction on multi-relational social data; (3) an on-line method to handle temporal evolution through incremental hypergraph factorization. Extensive experiments on real-world enterprise data suggest that our technique is scalable and can extract meaningful communities. To evaluate the quality of our mining results, we use our method to predict users' future interests. Our prediction outperforms baseline methods (frequency counts, pLSA) by 36-250% on the average, indicating the utility of leveraging multi-relational social context by using our method.
    Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on World Wide Web, WWW 2009, Madrid, Spain, April 20-24, 2009; 01/2009
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    ABSTRACT: View maintenance is a problem in data management that arises whenever a view is materialized over a source that changes over time. When the source is large, or when the source and view reside on different hosts, it is not practical to recompute the view and retransmit it over the network each time the source is updated. A better idea, commonly used in systems built with view maintenance in mind, is to translate source updates to ones that can be applied to the view directly. The cost of calculating, transmitting, and applying a translated update is typically dramatically less than the cost of recomputing and retransmitting the entire view. This paper addresses the problem of maintaining XQuery views over XML data. The core algorithm translates updates through queries as expressed in the tree algebra used internally in the Galax engine. This algorithm extends previous work on maintenance for relational views, although there are significant complications due to the data model, which is both ordered and nested. To overcome these obstacles, we propose a scheme for storing auxiliary data that guides the translation of updates in this more complicated setting. A novel aspect of our approach compared to previous work is that the amount and content of annotations can be controlled by users, making it possible to balance the tradeoffs between the size of the auxiliary data and the quality of translated updates. We have built a prototype implementation to test these ideas. Our system extends Galax, and handles a core set of operators and built-in functions capable of expressing many typical first- order queries. Its design is fully compositional, so it can easily be extended to new operators. We present preliminary results of experiments run on benchmark queries from the XMark suite. Categories and Subject Descriptors H.2.4 (Information Sys- tems): Database Management—Query Processing
    PLAN-X 2008, Programming Language Technologies for XML, An ACM SIGPLAN Workshop colocated with POPL 2008, San Francisco, California, USA, January 9, 2008; 01/2008
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    ABSTRACT: Heavily script-based browser applications change the manner in which users interact with Web browsers. Instead of downloading a succession of HTML pages, users download a single application and use that application for a long period of time. The application is not a set of HTML pages, but rather a single page that can possible modify its own presentation based on data exchanged with a server. In such an environment, it is necessary to provide some means for the client to manage its own state. We describe the initial results of our work in providing client-side state management services for these script-based applications. We focus on browser-based services that can help the user before any data is committed on the server. Our services include state checkpointing, property binding, operation logging, operational replay, ATOM/RSS data updates, and application-controlled persistence.
    01/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: Mobile applications often need to synchronize their data with backend servers. Synchronization semantics have typically been set at the level of backend datastores. This is a major hindrance for enterprise applications that cannot assume a uniform storage model. In this paper, we present the SodaSync framework that provides a generic synchronization model for mobile enterprise applications that use heterogeneous backend stores. SodaSync exploits a unifying higher-level data model of service data objects (SDO) and introduces a persistence and synchronization framework for the model. It allows application programmers to express data and consistency requirements in terms of the SDO model and thereby emancipates them from the replication nuances of various backend stores. We present the major features of SodaSync, its architecture, and the status of our implementation.
    Mobile Computing Systems and Applications, 2004. WMCSA 2004. Sixth IEEE Workshop on; 01/2005
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    ABSTRACT: Service-oriented architectures (SOA) will provide the basis of the next generation of distributed software systems, and have already gained enormous traction in the industry through an XML--based instantiation, Web services. A central aspect of SOAs is the looser coupling between applications (services) that is achieved when services publish their functional and non-functional behavioral characteristics in a standardized, machine readable format. In this paper we argue that in the basic SOA model access to metadata is too static and results in inflexible interactions between requesters and providers. We propose specific extensions to the SOA model to allow service providers and requestors to dynamically expose and negotiate their public behavior, resulting in the ability to specialize and optimize the middleware supporting an interaction. We introduce a middleware architecture supporting this extended SOA functionality, and describe a conformant implementation based on standard Web services middleware. Finally, we demonstrate the advantages of this approach with a detailed real world scenario.
    05/2004;
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a comprehensive set of technologies that enables rich interaction paradigms for Web applications. These technologies improve the richness of user interfaces and the responsiveness of user interactions. Furthermore, they support disconnected or weakly connected modes of operation. The technologies can be used in conjunction with many Web browsers and client platforms, interacting with a J2EE™ server. The approach is based on projecting the server-side model-view-controller paradigm onto the client. This approach is firmly rooted in the Web paradigm and proposes a series of incremental extensions. Most of the described technologies have been adopted by IBM server (WebSphere®) and client products.
    Ibm Systems Journal 02/2004; · 1.29 Impact Factor
  • Ibm Systems Journal 01/2004; 43(2):297-315. · 1.29 Impact Factor
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    Nirmal Mukhi, Ravi B. Konuru, Francisco Curbera
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    ABSTRACT: Service-oriented architectures (SOA) will provide the basis of thenext generation of distributed software systems, and have already gained enormous traction in the industry through an XML--based instantiation, Web services. A central aspect of SOAs is the looser coupling between applications (services) that is achieved when services publish their functional and non-functional behavioral characteristics in a standardized, machine readable format. In this paper we argue that in the basic SOA model access to metadata is too static and results in inflexible interactions between requesters and providers. We propose specific extensions to the SOA model to allow service providers and requestors to dynamically expose and negotiate their public behavior, resulting in the ability to specialize and optimize the middleware supporting an interaction. We introduce a middleware architecture supporting this extended SOA functionality, and describe a conformant implementation based on standard Web services middleware. Finally, we demonstrate the advantages of this approach with a detailed real world scenario.
    Proceedings of the 13th international conference on World Wide Web - Alternate Track Papers & Posters, WWW 2004, New York, NY, USA, May 17-20, 2004; 01/2004
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    Ravi Konuru, Nirmal Mukhi
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    ABSTRACT: Web service providers rely on the Web Service Description Language (WSDL) as the way to communicate information about an available service to a service requestor. This description or meta-data of the service is used by a service requestor to inspect the available interfaces and to access the service. In this paper, we argue that publishing a WSDL with a functional description of a service alone is not requestor friendly, i.e., it does not allow the requestor any flexibility in improving the end-to-end responsiveness and customize the Web Service behavior. We present some scenarios to back this argument and also outline a spectrum of solution approaches.
    07/2003;
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    G. Sevitsky, W. de Pauw, R. Konuru
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    ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of performance and memory problems can require the analysis of large and complex data sets describing a program's execution. An analysis tool must help the user both find the right organization of the data to uncover useful information, and work with the data through a lengthy and unpredictable discovery process. We present Jinsight EX, a tool for analyzing Java performance, that adopts techniques that have been successfully used to explore large data sets in other application domains, and adapts them specifically to the needs of program execution analysis. We introduce execution slices, a high-level organizing abstraction that the user may define and then easily reuse in various settings. We illustrate techniques that allow the user to perform a range of common analysis tasks and to structure a longer analysis process, using this abstraction. We present the tool, its implementation and initial experience of its use
    Technology of Object-Oriented Languages and Systems, 2001. TOOLS 38. Proceedings; 02/2001
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    ABSTRACT: Execution behavior of a Java application can be nondeterministic due to concurrent threads of execution, thread scheduling, and variable network delays. This nondeterminism in Java makes the understanding and debugging of multi-threaded distributed Java applications a difficult and a laborious process. It is well accepted that providing deterministic replay of application execution is a key step towards programmer productivity and program understanding. Towards this goal, we developed a replay framework based on logical thread schedules and logical intervals. An application of this framework was previously published in the context of a system called DejaVu that provides deterministic replay of multi-threaded Java programs on a single Java Virtual Machine(JVM). In contrast, this paper focuses on distributed DejaVu that provides deterministic replay of distributed Java applications running on multiple JVMs. We describe the issues and present the design, implementation and preliminary per...
    12/2000;
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    Olivier Gruber, Ravi B. Konuru
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    ABSTRACT: Recent years have witnessed a rapid increase in the use of personal information devices such as Palms or smart phones, with some people carrying more than one. Moreover, these devices need to work in disconnected mode and vary widely in their features. How does one provide an information-centric experience, across devices, for the end user? The goal of the Bali project is to provide a run-time platform that improves application portability and adaptability across devices. Bali addresses these issues through a minimal, easily deployable Java Runtime Environment, and a JavaBean-based application model. Beans transparently persist and are the units of replication. Bali provides semi-automated replication where applications only deal with the resolution of conflicting updates across devices. Code deployment is fully automated and coordinated with replication. Bali supports a powerful linking framework between beans allowing hyper-linking applications to be easily developed, even in the presence of cross-device replica. Bali fosters programmers' productivity through transparent object management and leverages a model-view-controller architecture enabling applications to adapt to device features as well as increasing code reuse. This paper describes the Bali application model, the minimal JRE, our partially implemented prototype as well as preliminary experience.
    Persistent Object Systems, 9th International Workshop, POS-9, Lillehammer, Norway, September 6-8, 2000, Revised Papers; 01/2000