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Publications (9)6.03 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Drought is a global problem that has far-reaching impacts and especially on vulnerable populations in developing regions. This paper highlights the need for a Global Drought Early Warning System (GDEWS), the elements that constitute its underlying framework (GDEWF) and the recent progress made towards its development. Many countries lack drought monitoring systems, as well as the capacity to respond via appropriate political, institutional and technological frameworks, and these have inhibited the development of integrated drought management plans or early warning systems. The GDEWS will provide a source of drought tools and products via the GDEWF for countries and regions to develop tailored drought early warning systems for their own users. A key goal of a GDEWS is to maximize the lead time for early warning, allowing drought managers and disaster coordinators more time to put mitigation measures in place to reduce the vulnerability to drought. To address this, the GDEWF will take both a top-down approach to provide global real-time drought monitoring and seasonal forecasting, and a bottom-up approach that builds upon existing national and regional systems to provide continental to global coverage. A number of challenges must be overcome, however, before a GDEWS can become a reality, including the lack of in-situ measurement networks and modest seasonal forecast skill in many regions, and the lack of infrastructure to translate data into useable information. A set of international partners, through a series of recent workshops and evolving collaborations, has made progress towards meeting these challenges and developing a global system.
    Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 05/2013; · 6.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Drought monitoring, assessment, response, mitigation, adaptation, and early warning systems have been created in a number of countries around the world, and some regional and continental efforts have been successful. However, the creation of a Global Drought Early Warning System (GDEWS) remains elusive. A GDEWS incorporates forecasting and research improvements, in addition to monitoring, impact, planning, mitigation and adaptation and recovery information. At a series of workshops in 2010, the US National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) agreed to take the first step toward a GDEWS, the formation of a Global Drought Monitoring Portal (GDMP). This effort currently covers three continents - North America, Europe, and Africa - and provides global drought indicator information through satellite products and Global Historical Climate Network locations. The GDMP has benefited from coordination with the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). Other nations have expressed interest in contributing and new regional and continental information should be online shortly. This paper presents the capabilities of the GDMP to link the monitoring, forecasting, research, and impacts aspects of international drought as well as the advantages of using common architecture through GEO to facilitate transfer and interoperability of GDEWS-related information.
    AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts. 12/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2007) has suggested the hydrometeorological extremes of both drought and flooding may increase under climate change. Drought zones can grow over large tracts of continental area and are a global-scale phenomenon (Sheffield and Wood 2011). The Group on Earth Observations Global Drought Monitor Portal (GDMP) was established as a demonstration for the 5th Earth Observation Ministerial Summit in Beijing in 2010. The European Drought Observatory, the North American Drought Monitor, the Princeton University experimental African Drought Monitor, and the University College London experimental global drought monitor were made "interoperable" through installation of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Mapping Services (WMS) on their respective servers, allowing maps of current drought conditions to be exchanged and assembled into maps of global drought coverage on the NIDIS portal. Partners from the Republic of Argentina, the Commonwealth of Australia, China, Jordan, Brazil, and Uruguay have also joined. The GEO Global Drought Monitoring, Forecasting, and Early Warning effort involves multiple parties and institutions, including the World Meteorological Organization, the World Climate Research Program Drought Interest Group, NASA, and others. The GEO Secretariat held a launch workshop in Geneva on 4-6 May 2010 to initiate drafting the final GEO Work Plan, and, during this meeting, additional capabilities were added to the existing GDMP: 1) drought forecasting was added to drought "current conditions" monitoring, in a partnership with Joint Research Centre (and other partners) aiming at a combined platform for Hydrological Extremes (drought and flooding); 2) extending drought forecasts from the medium-range 15-day window to a 30-day window; this will be tested through pilot projects over Europe and Africa, as part of the Global Water Scarcity Information Service (GLOWASIS)and the Improved Drought Early Warning Forecasting for Africa (DEWFORA) to strengthen preparedness and adaptation; 3) setting up an Early Warning System network for drought ( to be developed through World Meteorological Organization WMO); and 4) adding global remote sensing drought monitoring capabilities (soil moisture anomalies). Flooding represents positive precipitation anomalies, whereas drought represents negative precipitation anomalies. The JRC combined Hydrologic Extremes platform will include multiple models and tools, such as; 1) JRC Global Flood Detection System and Global Flood Early Warning System; 2) the WMO Flash Flood Guidance system; 3) the Dartmouth Flood Observatory; 4) a suite of monitored and forecasted drought and water scarcity indicators through the various drought observatories accessible through the GEO Global Drought Monitor Portal. The GEO Global Drought and Flooding systems represent the "applications-side" of water activities within the GEO Work Plan and are supported by the "Research and Development (R&D) side" of water activities within the new 2012-2015 GEO Work Plan.
    AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts. 12/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has created the Asian Water Cycle Initiative regional network for South Asia and NASA has launched two networks to enhance the rapid transitioning of scientific achievements and NASA technology into operational use. All three networks meet a new type of scientific challenge by providing strong linkage among the scientific communities, the space agencies, and decision makers. We focus here on the two NASA-sponsored networks that carry out complementary approaches: WaterNet focused on large-scale national/international collaborations; North Olympic Peninsula Solution Network developed a local proof of concept project first, then began integration and collaboration at progressively larger scales, culminating with a national-level discourse via the National Association of Resource, Conservation and Development councils (NARC&DC). The ultimate goals of both groups were to bring NASA Science and Technology products to organizations/groups to improve decision making and to create collaborations and networks that would extend beyond the parent groups and expand and continue to be sustainable, after the original projects were completed. This paper provides a summary of lessons learned. The primary objective of the NOPSN is to bring NASA science and technology tools to watershed managers to improve the scientific basis of decision making in NASA national application areas of water management, agricultural efficiency, and ecological forecasting. To achieve this objective, the NOPSN team first developed and implemented a local proof-of-concept project for the Dungeness River, Washington, to improve water forecasting. The team then developed local and regional collaborations with water resource managers, stakeholder groups, and local, state, and federal agencies to identify environmental issues, challenges, and needs that could be addressed with NASA technology. Finally,through its partnership with NARC&D, it provided the NOPSN team extended the Solutions Network concept nationally. The collaboration with the NARC&DC represented a unique aspect of NOPSN project, because it provided access to 375 member RC&D Councils throughout the United States. WaterNet created a network of scientists who develop products with NASA data and which include decision support systems, such as the California Nevada River Forecasting Center (flood forecasting), the Salt River Project (water supply for Phoenix, Arizona), the EPA Chesapeake Bay watershed water pollution model, the Drought Monitoring Center for Southeastern Europe (DMCSEE), and the Integrated Global Water Cycle Observations (IGWCO) community and water Societal Benefit Area within the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) for facilitating practical pilot projects. The experience of WaterNet's work is that rapid transitioning of remote sensing to operational decision support can be impeded or fostered by infrastructure and intermediary steps.
    AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts. 12/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Agriculture is the main consumer of freshwater, and improved precision and accuracy of the terrestrial water cycle requires a more reliable way of monitoring agricultural water use and agricultural water productivity. Wisser et al 2008 reported that agricultural water consumption over the satellite-determined crop acreage (from AVHRR, SPOT VGT), particularly for India and China (Thenkabail et al 2006) was 30% higher than the commonly used Food and Agricultural Organization country-reported agricultural crop census data. We propose further quantification and clarification of this error through the following methodology: 1) greater accuracy in measuring actual area and precise spatial distribution of irrigated and rainfed cropland areas, along with identification of crop types and cropping intensities; 2) satellite monitoring of actual evapotranspiration (water use) by croplands; 3) reconciling agricultural plot information and evapotranspiration against calculated stores of water and water budgets, as derived from a Global Hydrologic Model Multi-Model Ensemble; and (d) modeling and pin-pointing areas of low and high water productivity (WP) to optimize agricultural water use and thus save large quanta of water. We propose producing global irrigated and rainfed areas at finer scales using Landsat 30 m imagery in fusion with MODIS 250 m imagery using the spectral matching technique (Thenkabail et al 2009). Crop water use (water transpired by the crop) and crop water productivity maps can be prepared for terrestrial areas, by using the surface energy balance model, in which evapotranspiration fraction is provided from Landsat ETM+ and\or MODIS thermal data, combined with locally derived meteorological data such as wind speed, humidity, incoming radiation, and other surface values to derive turbulent diffusion and finally computing reference evapotranspiration (e.g., Penman-Montieth approach), so that sensible heat flux may be deducted from net radiation to derive evapotranspiration. Methodologies such as Simplified Surface Energy Balance model (Senay et. al., 2007) and disALEXI (Anderson et al)will be deployed. A real time water tracking and accounting system will be deployed for scales ranging from 1 kilometer to 5 kilometer. A multimodel ensemble will be employed to reduce individual model bias, and the ensemble will include the Water Balance Model (WBM/WTM), the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, and a high resolution version of the NASA/GSFC Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS), combined with post-processing routing algorithm (Shrestha and Houser 2008). Soil moisture anomalies will be estimated to provide drought indices (Sheffield et al 2004) by running the ensemble from 1890 to the present for each area.
    AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts. 01/2009; 1:10.
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    ABSTRACT: The inadequacies of water cycle observations for monitoring long-term changes in the global water system, as well as their feedback into the climate system, poses a major constraint on sustainable development of water resources and improvement of water management practices. Hence, The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) has established Task WA-08-01, "Integration of in situ and satellite data for water cycle monitoring," an integrative initiative combining different types of satellite and in situ observations related to key variables of the water cycle with model outputs for improved accuracy and global coverage. This presentation proposes development of the Rapid, Integrated Monitoring System for the Water Cycle (Global-RIMS)--already employed by the GEO Global Terrestrial Network for Hydrology (GTN-H)--as either one of the main components or linked with the Asian system to constitute the modeling system of GEOSS for water cycle monitoring. We further propose expanded, augmented capability to run multiple grids to embrace some of the heterogeneous methods and formats of the Earth Science, Hydrology, and Hydraulic Engineering communities. Different methodologies are employed by the Earth Science (land surface modeling), the Hydrological (GIS), and the Hydraulic Engineering Communities; with each community employing models that require different input data. Data will be routed as input variables to the models through web services, allowing satellite and in situ data to be integrated together within the modeling framework. Semantic data integration will provide the automation to enable this system to operate in near-real-time. Multiple data collections for ground water, precipitation, soil moisture satellite data, such as SMAP, and lake data will require multiple low level ontologies, and an upper level ontology will permit user-friendly water management knowledge to be synthesized. These ontologies will have to have overlapping terms mapped and linked together. so that they can cover an even wider net of data sources. The goal is to develop the means to link together the upper level and lower level ontologies and to have these registered within the GEOSS Registry. Actual operational ontologies that would link to models or link to data collections containing input variables required by models would have to be nested underneath this top level ontology, analogous to the mapping that has been carried out among ontologies within GEON.
    AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts. 12/2008;
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    ABSTRACT: A semantic web ontology enables semantic data integration and semantic smart searching. Several organizations have attempted to implement smart registration and integration or searching using ontologies. These are the NOESIS (NSF project: LEAD) and HydroSeek (NSF project: CUAHS HIS) data discovery engines and the NSF project GEON. All three applications use ontologies to discover data from multiple sources and projects. The NASA WaterNet project was established to identify creative, innovative ways to bridge NASA research results to real world applications, linking decision support needs to available data, observations, and modeling capability. WaterNet (NASA project) utilized the smart query tool Noesis as a testbed to test whether different ontologies (and different catalog searches) could be combined to match resources with user needs. NOESIS contains the upper level SWEET ontology that accepts plug in domain ontologies to refine user search queries, reducing the burden of multiple keyword searches. Another smart search interface was that developed for CUAHSI, HydroSeek, that uses a multi-layered concept search ontology, tagging variables names from any number of data sources to specific leaf and higher level concepts on which the search is executed. This approach has proven to be quite successful in mitigating semantic heterogeneity as the user does not need to know the semantic specifics of each data source system but just uses a set of common keywords to discover the data for a specific temporal and geospatial domain. This presentation will show tests with Noesis and Hydroseek lead to the conclusion that the construction of a complex, and highly heterogeneous water cycle ontology requires multiple ontology modules. To illustrate the complexity and heterogeneity of a water cycle ontology, Hydroseek successfully utilizes WaterOneFlow to integrate data across multiple different data collections, such as USGS NWIS. However,different methodologies are employed by the Earth Science, the Hydrological, and Hydraulic Engineering Communities, and each community employs models that require different input data. If a sub-domain ontology is created for each of these,describing water balance calculations, then the resulting structure of the semantic network describing these various terms can be rather complex, heterogeneous, and overlapping, and will require "mapping" between equivalent terms in the ontologies, along with the development of an upper level conceptual or domain ontology to utilize and link to those already in existence.
    AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts. 11/2008; -1:1029.
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    ABSTRACT: The water cycle is continuously being transformed by climate change, erosion, pollution, salinization, and engineering practices, and is central to drought, flood, and disease hazards. Therefore, it is a national priority is to use advancements in scientific observations and knowledge to develop solutions to society's water challenges. NASA's unique role in this national priority is to exploit its unique view from space to improve water and energy cycle monitoring and prediction. As such, NASA's Earth science programs have collected substantial water cycle information and knowledge that must be integrated and shared to develop solutions in all twelve national priority application areas. However, NASA alone cannot achieve the ultimate goal of improved operational environmental assessments, predictions and applications and therefore must establish collaborations and interoperability with existing networks and nodes of research organizations, operational agencies, the scientific community, and private industry. Therefore, we propose to develop WaterNet: The NASA Water Cycle Solutions Network whose goal is to improve and optimize the sustained ability of water cycle researchers, stakeholders, organizations and networks to interact, identify, harness, and extend NASA research results to augment decision support tools and meet national needs. We will develop WaterNet by engaging relevant NASA water and energy cycle resources and community-of-practice organizations to develop what we term an "actionable database" that can be used to communicate and connect NASA Water and energy cycle focus area research Results (NWRs) towards the improvement of water-related Decision Support Tools (DSTs). Recognizing the many existing highly valuable water-related science and application networks, we will focus a balance of our efforts to enable their interoperability in a solutions network context. We will initially focus on identifying, collecting information about, and analyzing the two end points, these being the NWRs and water related DSTs. We will then develop strategies to connect these two end points via innovative communication strategies, improved user access to NASA resources, improved water cycle research community appreciation for DST requirements, improved policymaker, management and stakeholder knowledge of NASA research and application products, and identifying pathways for progress. Finally, we will develop relevant benchmarking and metrics, to understand the network's characteristics, to optimize its performance, and to establish sustainability.
    IEEE International Geoscience & Remote Sensing Symposium, IGARSS 2007, July 23-28, 2007, Barcelona, Spain, Proceedings; 01/2007
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    ABSTRACT: Earth is a unique, living planet due to the abundance and vigorous cycling of water throughout the global environment. Water is essential to life and directly impacts society's welfare, progress, and sustainable growth. It is a national priority to use advancements in scientific observations and knowledge to develop solutions to the water challenges faced by society. NASA has collected substantial water cycle information and knowledge that must be transitioned to develop solutions for all twelve National Priority Application (NPA) areas and must establish collaborations and interoperability with existing networks and nodes of research organizations, operational agencies, science communities, and private industry. Therefore, WaterNet: The NASA Water Cycle Solutions Network will foster a Water and Energy cycle Community of Practice who has knowledge of both decision support needs and cutting-edge research results, and therefore can formulate a broad array of solutions to augment decision support tools and meet national needs.