Rachel M Wald

Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Publications (66)260.64 Total impact

  • Journal of the American College of Cardiology 10/2014; 64(17):1862–1864. · 14.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rationale and Objectives To investigate four-dimensional (4D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance (MR) in the evaluation of intracardiac shunts by simultaneous assessment of pulmonary (QP) and systemic (QS) flows in a pilot study and to compare results to through-plane two-dimensional (2D) PC MR. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained. Nineteen patients with suspected intracardiac shunts underwent cardiac MR at 1.5T. Assessments of QP and QS were performed using free-breathing retrospectively gated 2D PC gradient recalled echo (GRE; 1.6 × 1.6 × 5 mm3) imaging with one-dimensional through-plane velocity encoding gradient (venc = 150 cm/s) in consecutive measurements for the main pulmonary artery (MPA) and ascending aorta (AA), respectively. A prospectively triggered 4D PC GRE technique (2.4 × 1.8 × 3 mm3) with three orthogonal venc directions was also used with volume coverage of both MPA and AA. Results QP and QS assessed by 4D PC correlated with 2D PC acquisitions (r = 0.92 and r = 0.67 respectively; P < .0001 for both) but demonstrated significant underestimation of individual flow volumes (−21.9 ± 12.2 mL; P < .0001 and −10.7 ± 13.1 mL; P = .0023, respectively). Calculated QP:QS ratios demonstrated high correlation (r = 0.78; P < .0001) and no significant differences between 4D PC and 2D PC acquisitions (−0.09 ± 0.24, P = .14). Image acquisition times for 2D PC assessment of QP and QS were 2.98 ± 0.52 and 2.84 ± 0.50 minutes, respectively (P = .038), whereas time to acquire 4D PC images was significantly longer, 18.75 ± 4.58 minutes (P < .001). Conclusions Four-dimensional PC MR imaging allows for accurate assessment of QP:QS ratios in the evaluation of intracardiac shunts while absolute flow volumes demonstrate offsets. Further refinement of the technique with improvement in acquisition times may be required before widespread clinical implementation.
    Academic Radiology 08/2014; 21(8):1002–1008. · 1.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The coronary sinus (CS) is an important vascular structure that allows for access into the coronary veins in multiple interventional cardiology procedures, including catheter ablation of arrhythmias, pacemaker implantation and retrograde cardioplegia. The success of these procedures is facilitated by the knowledge of the CS anatomy, in particular the recognition of its variants and anomalies. This pictorial essay reviews the spectrum of CS anomalies, with particular attention to the distinction between clinically benign variants and life-threatening defects. Emphasis will be placed on the important role of cardiac CT and cardiovascular magnetic resonance in providing detailed anatomic and functional information of the CS and its relationship to surrounding cardiac structures. Teaching Points • Cardiac CT and cardiovascular magnetic resonance offer 3D high-resolution mapping of the coronary sinus in pre-surgical planning.• Congenital coronary sinus enlargement occurs in the presence or absence of a left-to-right shunt.• Lack of recognition of coronary sinus anomalies can lead to adverse outcomes in cardiac procedures.• In coronary sinus ostial atresia, coronary venous drainage to the atria occurs via Thebesian or septal veins.• Coronary sinus diverticulum is a congenital outpouching of the coronary sinus and may predispose to cardiac arrhythmias.
    Insights into imaging. 07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background Chronic hemodynamically relevant pulmonary regurgitation (PR) resulting in important right ventricular (RV) dilation and ventricular dysfunction is commonly seen after tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) repair. Late adverse clinical outcomes, including exercise intolerance, arrhythmias, heart failure and/or death, accelerate in the third decade of life and are cause for considerable concern. Timing of pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) to address chronic PR is controversial, particularly in asymptomatic individuals, and impact of PVR on clinical measures has not been determined. Methods Canadian Outcomes Registry Late After Tetralogy of Fallot Repair (CORRELATE) is a prospective, multi-centre, Canada-wide cohort study. Candidates will be included if they are ≥12 years of age, have had surgically repaired TOF resulting in moderate or severe PR, and are able to undergo cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Enrollment of >1000 individuals from 15 participating centres (Toronto, Montreal, Quebec City, Sherbrooke, Halifax, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver) is anticipated. Clinical data, health-related quality of life metrics and adverse outcomes will be entered into a web-based database. A central core lab will analyze all CMR studies (PR severity, RV volumes and ventricular function). Major adverse outcomes (sustained ventricular tachycardia and cardiovascular cause of death) will be centrally adjudicated. Conclusions CORRELATE will be the first prospective pan-Canadian cohort study of congenital heart disease in children and adults. CORRELATE will uniquely link clinical, imaging and functional data in those with repaired TOF and important PR, thereby enabling critical evaluation of clinically relevant outcomes in those managed conservatively as compared with those referred for PVR.
    The Canadian journal of cardiology 06/2014; · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In women with valvular heart disease, pregnancy-associated cardiovascular changes can contribute to maternal, fetal, and neonatal complications. Ideally, a woman with valvular heart disease should receive preconception assessment and counselling from a cardiologist with expertise in pregnancy. For women with moderate- and high-risk valve lesions, appropriate risk stratification and management during pregnancy will optimise outcomes. Pregnancy in women with high-risk lesions, such as severe aortic stenosis, severe mitral stenosis, and those with mechanical valves, requires careful planning and coordination of antenatal care by a multidisciplinary team. The purpose of this overview is to describe the expected haemodynamic changes in pregnancy, review pregnancy risks for women with valvular heart disease, and discuss strategies for management.
    Best practice & research. Clinical obstetrics & gynaecology 05/2014; · 1.87 Impact Factor
  • Tal Geva, Jose D Martins, Rachel M Wald
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    ABSTRACT: Atrial septal defects are the third most common type of congenital heart disease. Included in this group of malformations are several types of atrial communications that allow shunting of blood between the systemic and the pulmonary circulations. Most children with isolated atrial septal defects are free of symptoms, but the rates of exercise intolerance, atrial tachyarrhythmias, right ventricular dysfunction, and pulmonary hypertension increase with advancing age and life expectancy is reduced in adults with untreated defects. The risk of development of pulmonary vascular disease, a potentially lethal complication, is higher in female patients and in older adults with untreated defects. Surgical closure is safe and effective and when done before age 25 years is associated with normal life expectancy. Transcatheter closure offers a less invasive alternative for patients with a secundum defect who fulfil anatomical and size criteria. In this Seminar we review the causes, anatomy, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcomes of atrial septal defects in children and adult patients in whom this defect is the primary cardiac anomaly.
    The Lancet 04/2014; · 39.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In adults with prior arterial switch operation (ASO) for d-transposition of the great arteries, the need for routine coronary artery assessment and evaluation for silent myocardial ischemia is not well defined. In this observational study we aimed to determine the value of a comprehensive cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) protocol for the detection of coronary problems in adults with prior ASO for d-transposition of the great arteries. Adult ASO patients (≥18 years of age) were recruited consecutively. Patients underwent a comprehensive stress perfusion CMR protocol that included measurement of biventricular systolic function, myocardial scar burden, coronary ostial assessment and myocardial perfusion during vasodilator stress by perfusion CMR. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed on the same day as a confirmatory second imaging modality. Stress studies were visually assessed for perfusion defects (qualitative analysis). Additionally, myocardial blood flow was quantitatively analysed from mid-ventricular perfusion CMR images. In unclear cases, CT coronary angiography or conventional angiography was done. Twenty-seven adult ASO patients (mean age 23 years, 85% male, 67% with a usual coronary pattern; none with a prior coronary artery complication) were included in the study. CMR stress perfusion was normal in all 27 patients with no evidence of inducible perfusion defects. In 24 cases the coronary ostia could conclusively be demonstrated to be normal. There was disagreement between CMR and SPECT for visually-assessed perfusion defects in 54% of patients with most disagreement due to false positive SPECT. Adult ASO survivors in this study had no CMR evidence of myocardial ischemia, scar or coronary ostial abnormality. Compared to SPECT, CMR provides additional valuable information about the coronary artery anatomy. The data shows that the asymptomatic and clinically stable adult ASO patient has a low pre-test probability for inducible ischemia. In this situation it is likely that routine evaluation with stress CMR is unnecessary.
    Journal of cardiovascular magnetic resonance : official journal of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance. 01/2014; 16(1):98.
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to clarify the correlates of left ventricular mass and secondarily, left ventricular volume, in a cohort of prevalent hemodialysis recipients. Left ventricular hypertrophy is common and left ventricular mass is a widely-accepted surrogate for clinical outcomes in dialysis recipients, who are often subjected to chronic pressure and volume overload. However, the precise pathophysiologic mechanisms of left ventricular hypertrophy in this unique population have not been well understood. This was a cross-sectional study of patients receiving conventional thrice-weekly dialysis in Toronto, Canada. Left ventricular mass and volume were assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance and indexed to the patient's height to the power of 2.7. Fibroblast growth factor-23 concentration was measured using a C-terminal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Patient demographics, comorbidities, dialysis-associated blood pressures and ultrafiltration volumes, biochemical and hematologic parameters, vascular access and medications were extracted from clinical records. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify independent correlates of left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and the left ventricular end diastolic volume index (LVEDVI). We enrolled 56 patients, of whom 23 (41.1 %) were women with mean age 54 ± 12 years. Mean LVMI was 31.1 ± 6.8 g/m(2.7). In multivariable analyses, systolic blood pressure and LVEDVI were the only factors significantly associated with LVMI. Post-dialysis weight, percent reduction in urea and the presence of a permanent form of vascular access were associated with LVEDVI. Fibroblast growth factor-23 was not associated with either LVMI or LVEDVI. Blood pressure and left ventricular dilatation are independent determinants of elevated left ventricular mass. Aggressive blood pressure reduction and avoidance of volume overload may confer LVM regression and improve clinical outcomes.
    The international journal of cardiovascular imaging 11/2013; · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) experience increased rates of mortality and morbidity in adulthood. This study was designed to identify risk factors for death and ventricular tachycardia (VT) in a large contemporary cohort of patients with repaired TOF. Subjects with repaired TOF from four large congenital heart centres in the USA, Canada and Europe were enrolled. Clinical, ECG, exercise, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and outcome data were analysed. Of the 873 patients (median age 24.4 years), 32 (3.7%) reached the primary outcome (28 deaths, 4 sustained VT; median age at outcome 38 years; median time from CMR to outcome 1.9 years). Cox proportional-hazards regression identified RV mass-to-volume ratio ≥0.3 g/mL (HR, 5.04; 95% CI 2.3 to 11.0; p<0.001), LV EF z score<-2.0 (HR, 3.34; 95% CI 1.59 to 7.01; p=0.001), and history of atrial tachyarrhythmia (HR, 3.65; 95% CI 1.75 to 7.62; p=0.001) as outcome predictors. RV dysfunction was predictive of the outcome similar to LV dysfunction. In subgroup analysis of 315 subjects with echocardiographic assessment of RV systolic pressure, higher pressure (HR 1.39; 95% CI 1.19 to 1.62; p<0.001) was associated with death and sustained VT independent of RV hypertrophy and LV dysfunction. RV hypertrophy, ventricular dysfunction and atrial tachyarrhythmias are predictive of death and sustained VT in adults with repaired TOF. These findings may inform risk stratification and the design of future therapeutic trials.
    Heart (British Cardiac Society) 10/2013; · 5.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Vasodilator stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is a clinically useful tool for detection of clinically significant myocardial ischaemia in adults. We report our 5-year retrospective experience with perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance in a large, quarternary adult congenital heart disease centre. Methods: We reviewed all cases of perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients referred from the adult congenital heart disease service. Dipyridamole stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance was undertaken on commercially available 1.5 and 3 T cardiovascular magnetic resonance scanners. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging was performed 8-10 minutes after completion of the rest perfusion sequence. Navigator whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography was also performed where feasible. Results of stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance were correlated with complementary imaging studies, surgery, and clinical outcomes. Results: Over 5 years, we performed 34 stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations (11 positive). In all, 84% of patients had further investigations for ischaemia in addition to cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Within a subgroup of 19 patients who had definitive alternative assessment of their coronary arteries, stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance demonstrated a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 100%. Of the 34 studies, two were false negatives, in which the aetiology of ischaemia was extrinsic arterial compression rather than intrinsic coronary luminal narrowing. Coronary abnormalities were identified in 71% of cases who had coronary magnetic resonance angiography. Conclusion: Stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance is a useful and accurate tool for investigation of myocardial ischaemia in an adult congenital heart disease population with suspected non-atherosclerotic coronary abnormalities.
    Cardiology in the Young 09/2013; · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to determine associations between aortic morphometry evaluated by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and pregnancy outcomes in women with aortic coarctation (CoA). Consecutive women with CoA seen with CMR within 2 years of delivery were reviewed. Aortic dimensions were measured on CMR angiography. Adverse outcomes (cardiovascular, obstetric, and foetal/neonatal) were documented. We identified 28 women (4 with native and 24 with repaired CoA) who had 30 pregnancies. There were 29 live births (1 stillbirth) at mean gestation 38 ± 2 weeks. Mean maternal ages at first cardiac intervention and pregnancy were 6 ± 8 and 29 ± 6 years, respectively. There were nine cardiovascular events (hypertensive complications in five; stroke in two and arrhythmia in two) occurring in seven pregnancies. Minimum aortic dimensions were smaller in women with cardiovascular events (12.1 vs. 14.3 mm, P = 0.001), specifically in those with hypertensive complications (11.6 vs. 14.4 mm, P < 0.001). From receiver operator curve analysis, optimal discrimination for the development of adverse cardiovascular events occurred at the 12 mm diameter threshold [sensitivity 78%, specificity 91%, area under the curve 0.86 (95% CI: 0.685-1)]. All hypertensive events occurred in conjunction with a minimum aortic diameter of 12 mm (7mm/m(2)) or less. No adverse outcomes occurred if minimum diameter exceeded 15 mm. Smaller aortic dimensions relate to increased risk of hypertensive events in pregnant women with CoA. CMR can aid in stratification of risk for women with CoA who are considering pregnancy.
    European heart journal cardiovascular Imaging. 09/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the impact of aortic root asymmetry on the relationship between aortic dimensions derived from two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) as compared with cross-sectional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in adults with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). Maximal CMR cross-sectional aortic measurements at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva, including cusp-commissure, cusp-cusp diameters and aortic root areas, from 68 consecutive patients (65 % male) were retrospectively analyzed. The degree of aortic root asymmetry on CMR was expressed using the coefficient of variance of the root diameters in each dimension for an individual (CoeffVi) as compared with the median of the entire population (CoeffVp) and asymmetry was defined as CoeffVi > CoeffVp. Values obtained from CMR were compared with standard root measurements using TTE from contemporary studies (48 patients, 71 %). Reproducibility of CMR measurements was assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Echocardiography systematically underestimated aortic root dimensions in comparison with CMR, particularly in asymmetric roots with cusp-cusp measurements in systole (bias: -4.9 mm). Best agreement between modalities existed in symmetric roots with cusp-commissure measurements in diastole (bias: -0.01 mm). CMR measurements showed excellent intra-reader (ICC ≥ 0.98) and moderate inter-reader (ICC range 0.37-0.95) reproducibility, particularly aortic root area (inter/intra-reader ICC ≥ 0.94). In comparison to cross-sectional CMR diameters, standard TTE measurements consistently underestimates maximum aortic root diameter in adults with a BAV and aortic root asymmetry further decreases the agreement between CMR and TTE. CMR-derived aortic root measurements are reproducible and aortic root area showed the best reproducibility.
    The international journal of cardiovascular imaging 08/2013; · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Advances in pediatric surgical and interventional techniques and medical care over the past 50 years have revolutionized the care of children with congenital heart disease. Survival to adulthood is now expected and, as such, there is a growing population of adults which is exceeding the pediatric population with congenital heart disease. Noninvasive cardiac imaging with modalities such as echocardiography, computed tomography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are integral to the care of adults with congenital heart disease. These modalities are used for diagnosis, surveillance for complications late after surgery and catheter-based interventions, and in decision-making for medical, interventional, and surgical therapies. In this review we will discuss noninvasive imaging modalities used to assess congenital cardiac lesions, imaging strategies for select congenital lesions, and comment on the future of cardiac imaging in congenital heart disease.
    The Canadian journal of cardiology 05/2013; · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 01/2013; 15(1). · 4.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A 71-year-old asymptomatic woman is found to have an incidental cardiac mass on transthoracic echocardiography. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings are consistent with lipotamous hypertrophy of the inter-atrial septum. Given the characteristic appearances on CMR, biopsy or surgery was not indicated and the patient was managed conservatively.
    Indian heart journal 01/2013; 66(2):244-6.
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    Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance 01/2013; 15(1). · 4.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE/AIM 1) To describe basic hemodynamic changes during pregnancy and the potential impact of these on women with congenital heart disease (CHD). 2) To describe the important role of cardiovascular MR for risk stratification of adverse outcomes related to pregnancy. CONTENT ORGANIZATION 1) Pregnancy-related changes in cardiovascular physiology include: increased cardiac output, elevation in heart rate, increased dilation of the aorta, decrease in vascular resistances and, in some cases, decline in ventricular function. 2) The impact of these changes will be applied to representative CHD lesions, including: a) residual lesions post tetralogy of Fallot repair (pulmonary insufficiency and right heart obstruction) b) progressive aortopathy in Marfan syndrome c) residual arch obstruction post coarctation repair d) systemic right ventricular dysfunction post Mustard palliation for transposed great arteries e) single ventricle physiology post Fontan palliation 3) The contribution of cardiovascular MR for risk stratification in each scenario will be reviewed. SUMMARY Cardiovascular MR is an emerging imaging modality for risk assessment related to pregnancy in women as it allows for precise definition of anatomy and ventricular function. Cardiovascular MR can guide the management of women with CHD before, during and after pregnancy.
    Radiological Society of North America 2012 Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting; 11/2012
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: While echocardiography (ECHO)-measured left ventricular mass (LVM) predicts adverse cardiovascular events that are common in hemodialysis (HD) recipients, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is now considered the reference standard for determination of LVM. This study aimed to evaluate concordance between LVM measurements across ECHO and CMR among chronic HD recipients and matched controls. METHODS: A single-centre, cross-sectional study of 41 chronic HD patients and 41 matched controls with normal kidney function was performed to compare LVM measurements and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) designation by ECHO and CMR. RESULTS: In both groups, ECHO, compared with CMR, overestimated LVM. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated wider agreement limits in LVM measurements by ECHO and CMR in the chronic HD group (mean difference, 60.8 g; limits -23 g to 144.6 g) than in the group with normal renal function (mean difference, 51.4 g; limits -10.5 g to 113.3 g). LVH prevalence by ECHO and CMR in the chronic HD group was 37.5% and 22.5%, respectively, while 17.5% and 12.5% had LVH by ECHO and CMR, respectively, in the normal kidney function group. Intermodality agreement in the designation of LVH was modest in the chronic HD patients (κ = 0.42, P = 0.005) but strong (κ = 0.81, P < 0.001) in the patients with preserved kidney function. Agreement was strong in assessing LVH by ECHO and CMR only in those with normal kidney function. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the limitations of LVM measurement by ECHO may be more pronounced in patients receiving HD, and provide additional support for the use of CMR in research and clinical practice when rigourous assessment of LVM is essential.
    The Canadian journal of cardiology 10/2012; · 3.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries (cc-TGA), the morphologic right ventricle acts as the subaortic (systemic) ventricle, and deterioration of the ventricle over time is a well-known complication. The objective of this study was to characterize the right ventricle and explore factors that may be contributing to ventricular dilation and dysfunction and the relationship with exercise capacity. This was a prospective study of adults with cc-TGA. All patients underwent cardiopulmonary stress testing, ventricular volume and fibrosis assessment by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and Velocity Vector Imaging strain echocardiography. Twenty-six patients were included (mean age, 38 ± 16 years; 54% women). Exercise capacity was significantly reduced in patients with cc-TGA compared with normal subjects (20.9 ± 6.0 vs 30.8 ± 9.2 mL/kg/min, P = .001). The majority of patients (61%) had right ventricular (RV) ejection fractions ≤ 40%. There was no evidence of fibrosis on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. There was a significant difference in diastolic volumes among those with RV ejection fractions > 40% versus ≤ 40% (173 ± 29mL vs 233 ± 65 mL, P = .02) and moderate or severe versus no or mild tricuspid regurgitation (240 ± 80mL vs 190 ± 38mL, P = .04). RV apical longitudinal and mid free wall circumferential strain was decreased compared with these values in controls. In this relatively "well" cc-TGA population, subaortic RV dilation, dysfunction, and exercise intolerance are a common problem. Significant systemic tricuspid atrioventricular valvular regurgitation is an important contributor to the problem. In this study, subaortic RV myocardial deformation parameters were found to be abnormal, suggesting that there is a failure of the ventricle to adapt to systemic pressures, and therapies to reduce afterload should be explored. Recurrent ischemia resulting in fibrosis likely does not contribute to RV dilation or dysfunction as demonstrated by the magnetic resonance imaging findings in this study.
    Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography: official publication of the American Society of Echocardiography 09/2012; 25(11):1215-21. · 2.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Recommendations for the peripartum obstetric management of women with heart disease have included early induction of labour, shortening the second stage of labour during vaginal delivery, and low threshold for elective Caesarean section, although such techniques may result in complications. The objective of this study was to determine whether a less aggressive approach without routine preterm induction, shortening of the second stage, or Caesarean section adversely affects the mother or neonate. Methods: We examined peripartum obstetric management and its relationship with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes in 1677 pregnancies: 559 in women with heart disease and 1118 in women without heart disease (control subjects). Logistic regression with propensity matching was used to compare outcomes in women with and without heart disease. Results: Women with heart disease were more likely than control subjects to undergo induction of labour (P < 0.001). Induction of labour tended to be at term and for logistical reasons, not for the indication of maternal heart disease. Assisted vaginal deliveries were more common in women with heart disease (29% vs. 11%, P < 0.001) than in those without, and the second stage of labour was also more prolonged in women with heart disease. Rates of Caesarean section were similar in both groups (P = 0.66). A significant proportion of women with heart disease had unassisted vaginal deliveries. Invasive cardiac monitoring was rarely used. Adverse maternal cardiac events at delivery were rare (2% of pregnancies) and were not associated with mode of delivery. In multivariate analysis, maternal heart disease was not predictive of adverse neonatal events or third- or fourth- degree lacerations. Maternal heart disease was associated with postpartum hemorrhage, but this was not related to assisted delivery or prolonged second stage of labour. Conclusion: This large study has shown that in women with heart disease, avoidance of early induction of labour, rare use of Caesarean section for cardiac indications, and selective use of invasive monitoring produces safe obstetric outcomes.
    Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology Canada: JOGC = Journal d'obstetrique et gynecologie du Canada: JOGC 09/2012; 34(9):812-9.

Publication Stats

467 Citations
260.64 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2014
    • Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto
      • Department of Cardiology
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2007–2014
    • University of Toronto
      • • Division of Cardiology
      • • Hospital for Sick Children
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2010–2013
    • UHN: Toronto General Hospital
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2005–2013
    • Boston Children's Hospital
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Department of Cardiac Surgery
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • SickKids
      • Division of Cardiology
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2012
    • St. Paul's Hospital
      Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
  • 2009–2011
    • University Health Network
      • • Department of Medical Imaging
      • • Department of Cardiology
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2008
    • Mount Sinai Hospital
      New York City, New York, United States