Dorit Nevo

York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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Publications (22)7.51 Total impact

  • Hamed Tajedin, Dorit Nevo
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    ABSTRACT: With the advent of digitization, recent years have witnessed a surge toward collective undertaking of production process different from traditional ways of organizing. In this vein, crowdsourcing has lent itself into a successful emerging mode of organizing and firms are increasingly using it in their value creation activities. However, despite popularity in practice, crowdsourcing has received little attention from IS scholars. Specifically, what the determinants of success in this model are remains an unexplored area of research that we strive to address in this paper. We focus on software development via crowdsourcing and drawing on studies from IS success, OSS and software development, we build a model of success that has three determinants: the characteristics of the project, the composition of the crowd and the relationship among key players. Finally, we describe our research methodology and conclude with potential contributions of our work.
    Proceedings of the 2013 annual conference on Computers and people research; 05/2013
  • Saggi Nevo, Dorit Nevo, Henry M. Kim
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    ABSTRACT: Although three-dimensional, immersive virtual worlds, such as Active Worlds, Second Life, and Teleplace have been in existence for several years, their organizational use is rather limited. This paper posits, perhaps counter intuitively, that the diffusion of virtual worlds within organizations could be enhanced by their recreational usage. This argument is motivated by the notion developed in this paper that the use of technologies need not remain within a single context, but instead can cross-contexts, for example from recreational to vocational. We term such shift cross-context IS continuance. This paper proposes that workers using virtual worlds for recreational (i.e., hedonic and social) use are suitably positioned to discover those technologies’ workplace applicability, thereby assisting in their diffusion within the organization. Building on the supporting results of an empirical study, this paper recommends that managers consider allowing for ‘playtime’ with virtual worlds as a mechanism for enhancing their adoption and subsequent diffusion in the workplace. From an information systems (IS)-research perspective, this paper makes several important contributions. First, it contributes to the IS continuance literature by arguing for, and providing evidence in support of, the existence of cross-context continuance. To date, this literature stream has examined only one aspect of continuance – for example, within-context. Second, this paper identifies recreational and work as distinct dimensions of technology usage, and hedonic and social usage as sub-dimensions of the former, thereby contributing to the contextualization of this core IS construct. Third, it is one of the early field studies dedicated to the empirical examination of virtual worlds.
    Journal of Information Technology 01/2012; 27:74-86. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Saggi Nevo, Dorit Nevo
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    ABSTRACT: The prevailing view in IS research considers technology users as passive actors in the innovation diffusion process who face only two possible behaviors regarding the technology they receive -- i.e., either use or nonuse. According to this view, individuals either accept the technology as it is presented to them or outright reject it. We contest this view and propose that a third behavior more accurately characterizes the landscape of post-adoption behaviors -- that is, IT reinvention. We argue that reinvention is important for post-adoption IS research and propose a new theory. By tracing a path from IT dissatisfaction to technology reinvention, this paper makes several contributions to IS research and practice. First, it sheds lights on a complex phenomenon -- that is, the consequences of IT dissatisfaction. Second, the paper informs managers on how to view IT dissatisfaction as a possible occasion for technology reinvention, with potentially positive outcomes.
    01/2012;
  • DORIT NEVO, IZAK BENBASAT, YAIR WAND
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    ABSTRACT: Transactive memory is an effective mechanism for locating and coordinating expertise in small groups and has been shown to hold numerous benefits for groups and organizations. To extend transactive memory beyond the scope of small groups, researchers have proposed the use of information technology (IT). This paper provides an integrated discussion of our knowledge from three studies concerning IT support in transactive memory in organizations. Focusing on meta-memory, which is at the heart of transactive memory systems, we examine what meta-memory is maintained by members of transactive memory systems, whether providing this meta-memory in a technology-mediated environment can lead to transactive memory development, whether IT can realistically provide this meta-memory, and whether different requirements exist for different users and in different stages of transactive memory development. We discuss the implications of these studies to both research and practice.
    Journal of Management Information Systems 01/2012; 28(4):69-97. · 1.26 Impact Factor
  • Hossam Ali-Hassan, Dorit Nevo
    Annual Conference of Administrative Sciences Association of Canada (ASAC), Montreal, Canada; 07/2011
  • D. Nevo, I. Benbasat, Y. Wand
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explores the knowledge demands of expertise seekers for the purpose of designing effective expertise locator systems. We conduct an empirical investigation, using conjoint analysis and within-subject tests, exploring the relative importance assigned to different experts' attributes under two expertise seeking contexts: knowledge allocation and knowledge retrieval. Our results show that when choosing an expert to retrieve knowledge from (knowledge retrieval), expertise seekers will assign greater importance to the person's level of expertise. When selecting an expert to transfer knowledge to (knowledge allocation), attributes representing the network ties between the expert and the seeker and the benevolence of the expert will be perceived as more important. The results are important for the design of expertise locator systems that are better customized to fit the knowledge needs of their users.
    System Sciences (HICSS), 2011 44th Hawaii International Conference on; 02/2011
  • S. Nevo, D. Nevo
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    ABSTRACT: Although 3D immersive virtual worlds such as Active Worlds, Second Life, and There have been in existence for several years, their organizational use is limited and falls short of their recreational use (e.g., social and entertainment activities). In this paper we build on the diffusion of innovations and lateralization of the brain literatures to link recreational and organizational use of virtual worlds. Specifically, we theorize that play-time with virtual worlds (i.e., their use under recreational context) is conducive for re-inventing these technologies as beneficial tools for the workplace, impacting intentions to use them in the work context. The empirical evidence provides encouraging support, suggesting that organizations can leverage play-time to enhance adoption and diffusion of virtual worlds. This paper contributes to our understanding of the interplay between work and life in the context of technology use.
    System Sciences (HICSS), 2011 44th Hawaii International Conference on; 02/2011
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    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an empirical study investigating the impact of organizational social computing on employees' innovative and in-role job performance. Specifically, we suggest that two key uses of social computing, representing the use of social computing tools for maintaining social relations and for generating and sharing content, are positively related to employees' access to knowledge. Access to knowledge, in the form of expertise location and access to codified information, is in turn positively associated with employees' innovative and in-role job performance. For this study a conceptual model is developed and tested via a cross-sectional survey. The findings suggest that the two key uses of organizational social computing are positively associated with access to knowledge which in turn is positively related to the two forms of job performance at varying degrees. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed, as are directions for future research.
    44th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science (HICSS-44 2011), Proceedings, 4-7 January 2011, Koloa, Kauai, HI, USA; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: With advances in the areas of telecommunications, computing and miniaturization of computers, the use of mobile technology is becoming prevalent within organizations. Consequently, a shift towards a nomadic computing environment, capable of supporting workers anywhere and anytime, is commonly observed. While many of the issues associated with such environments are technological in nature, this paper focuses on the social aspect of the shift to a nomadic computing environment, and examines its impact of employees' ability to effectively collaborate with one another. Studying changes at the individual level, we argue that an increase in workers' social mobility, brought upon by the move to a nomadic computing environment, is likely to have a negative effect on their social capital. Social capital has been shown to positively impact collaboration in various settings, including the workplace. We further argue that the above negative effect is contingent upon the type of mobile technology used by nomadic workers. The paper concludes with suggestions for model extensions and avenues for future research.
    DATA BASE. 01/2010; 41:9-24.
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    Communications of the Association for Information Systems 01/2010; 27(1). · 1.29 Impact Factor
  • Communications of the Association for Information Systems 01/2009; 25(24):221-242. · 1.29 Impact Factor
  • Hossam Ali-Hassan, Dorit Nevo
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Information Systems, ICIS 2009, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, December 15-18, 2009; 01/2009
  • Dorit Nevo, Brent Furneaux, Yair Wand
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we develop an evaluation framework for Knowledge Management Systems (KMS). The framework builds on the theoretical foundations underlying organizational Knowledge Management (KM) to identify key KM activities and the KMS capabilities required to support each activity. These capabilities are then used to form a benchmark for evaluating KMS. Organizations selecting KMS can use the framework to identify gaps and overlaps in the extent to which the capabilities provided and utilized by their current KMS portfolio meet the KM needs of the organization. Other applications of the framework are also discussed.
    Information Technology and Management 12/2008; 9(4):233-249. · 0.14 Impact Factor
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    Kai R. Larsen, Dorit Nevo, Eliot Rich
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    ABSTRACT: Many behavioral researchers have been or are currently engaged in survey research, analyzing results using statistical methods. Respondents are often asked to fill out questionnaires leading to questionnaire fatigue and reluctance to conscientiously respond. Furthermore, in spite of the popularity of the approach, serious unanswered questions remain about what questionnaires actually measure. To answer these questions, this paper ventures into a new area of inquiry within survey research, providing a semantic analysis of questionnaires. In so doing we diverge from traditional survey validity measures, and offer a cutting edge approach to questionnaire validation with important contributions to future research.
    41st Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science (HICSS-41 2008), Proceedings, 7-10 January 2008, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA; 01/2008
  • Brent Furneaux, Dorit Nevo
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    ABSTRACT: Information systems (IS) research often attempts to examine and explain how technology leads to outcomes through usage of information technology (IT). Although extensive research in this area has resulted in a significant number of theories, limited work has been done on integrating these theories. This paper presents adaptive structuration theory (AST) as a meta-theory for examining IS within a socio-technical systems (STS) context. Two main contributions are: 1) an understanding of meta-theory and how it fits with other meta-studies and 2) applying AST as a meta-theory to: A) achieve deeper domain understanding, B) provide an overarching perspective for reviewing literature and linking existing theories, and C) build and test better domain specific theories of IS within STS. The paper also provides illustrations on reviewing literature using AST in the virtual team domain as well as an illustration of theory development using meta-theory in the domain of technology-mediated learning.
    41st Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science (HICSS-41 2008), Proceedings, 7-10 January 2008, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA; 01/2008
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    Dorit Nevo, Michael R. Wade
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    ABSTRACT: Avoid market failure by aligning system performance with stakeholder expectations.
    Commun. ACM. 01/2007; 50:43-48.
  • Dorit Nevo, Yolande E. Chan
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    ABSTRACT: This paper studies the formation of users’ expectations and desires from knowledge management systems, and their impacts on satisfaction with these systems. Building on a foundation of expectations confirmation theory and interviews with top managers, three important insights are obtained: (1) expectations and desires differ in their formation and content; (2) the conversion of abstract level desires into concrete product attributes is challenging to top managers; and (3) expectations and desires lie along a time continuum, with expectations playing an important role in shaping perceptions of the knowledge management systems in the short run, and desires being more oriented towards determining satisfaction in the long run. Furthermore, the existence of desires can mitigate the impact of expectations on satisfaction as users look forward to the positive benefits of their desires’ future realization.
    Decision Support Systems. 01/2007;
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    Dorit Nevo, Yolande E. Chan
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    ABSTRACT: We empirically explored the roles and scope of knowledge management systems in organizations. Building on a knowledge-based view of the firm, we hypothesized and empirically tested our belief that more integration is needed between technologies intended to support knowledge and those supporting business operations. Findings from a Delphi study and in-depth interviews illustrated this and led us to suggest a revised approach to developing organizational knowledge management systems.
    Information & Management. 01/2007;
  • Dorit Nevo, Yair Wand
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    ABSTRACT: Effective management of organizational memory (OM) is critical to collaboration and knowledge sharing in organizations. We present a framework for managing organizational memory based on transactive memory, a mechanism of collective memory in small groups. While being effective in small groups, there are difficulties hindering the extension of transactive memory to larger groups. We claim that information technology can be used to help overcome these difficulties. We present a formal architecture for directories of meta-memories required in extended transactive memory systems and propose the use of meta-knowledge to substitute for the lack of tacit group knowledge that exists in small groups.
    Decision Support Systems. 01/2005;
  • Dorit Nevo, Izak Benbasat, Yair Wand
    Proceedings of the International Conference on Information Systems, ICIS 2003, December 14-17, 2003, Seattle, Washington, USA; 01/2003