John Doherty

FX Palo Alto Laboratory, Palo Alto, California, United States

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Publications (9)0 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: NudgeCam is a mobile application that can help users capture more relevant, higher quality media. To guide users to capture media more relevant to a particular project, third-party template creators can show users media that demonstrates relevant content and can tell users what content should be present in each captured media using tags and other meta-data such as location and camera orientation. To encourage higher quality media capture, NudgeCam provides real time feedback based on standard media capture heuristics, including face positioning, pan speed, audio quality, and many others. We describe an implementation of NudgeCam on the Android platform as well as field deployments of the application.
    Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Multimedea 2010, Firenze, Italy, October 25-29, 2010; 01/2010
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    ABSTRACT: The Pantheia system enables users to create virtual models by `marking up' the real world with pre-printed markers. The markers have predefined meanings that guide the system as it creates models. Pantheia takes as input user captured images or video of the marked up space. This video illustrates the workings of the system and shows it being used to create three models, one of a cabinet, one of a lab, and one of a conference room. As part of the Pantheia system, we also developed a 3D viewer that spatially integrates a model with images of the model.
    Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Multimedia 2009, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, October 19-24, 2009; 01/2009
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    Conference Paper: Virtual physics circus.
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    ABSTRACT: This video shows the Virtual Physics Circus, a kind of playground for experimenting with simple physical models. The system makes it easy to create worlds with common physical objects such as swings, vehicles, ramps, and walls, and interactively play with those worlds. The system can be used as a creative art medium as well as to gain understanding and intuition about physical systems. The system can be controlled by a number of UI devices such as mouse, keyboard, joystick, and tags which are tracked in 6 degrees of freedom.
    Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Multimedia 2008, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, October 26-31, 2008; 01/2008
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    ABSTRACT: A common problem with teleconferences is awkward turn-taking – particularly ‘ collisions,’ whereby multiple parties inadvertently speak over each other due to communication delays. We propose a model for teleconference discussions including the effects of delays, and describe tools that can improve the quality of those interactions. We describe an interface to gently provide latency awareness, and to give advanced notice of ‘ incoming speech’ to help participants avoid collisions. This is possible when codec latencies are significant, or when a low bandwidth side channel or out-of-band signaling is available with lower latency than the primary video channel. We report on results of simulations, and of experiments carried out with transpacific meetings, that demonstrate these tools can improve the quality of teleconference discussions.
    2012 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo. 01/2005;
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    Qiong Liu, Frank Zhao, John Doherty, Don Kimber
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    ABSTRACT: ePic is an integrated presentation authoring and playback system that makes it easy to use a wide range of devices installed in one or multiple multimedia venues.
    Proceedings of the 12th ACM International Conference on Multimedia, New York, NY, USA, October 10-16, 2004; 01/2004
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    ABSTRACT: We demonstrate the use of detail-on-demand hypervideo in interactive training and video summarization. Detail-on-demand video allows viewers to watch short video segments and to follow hyperlinks to see additional detail. The player for detail-on-demand video displays keyframes indicating what links are available at each point in the video. The Hyper-Hitchcock authoring tool helps users create hypervideo by automatically dividing video into clips that can be combined in a direct manipulation interface. Clips can be grouped into composites and hyperlinks can be placed between clips and composites. A summarization algorithm creates multi-level hypervideo summaries from linear video by automatically selecting clips and placing links between them.
    Proceedings of the Eleventh ACM International Conference on Multimedia, Berkeley, CA, USA, November 2-8, 2003; 01/2003
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    ABSTRACT: The FXPAL Photo Application is designed to faciliate the organization of digital images from digital cameras and other sources through automated organization and intuitive user interfaces.
    Proceedings of the Eleventh ACM International Conference on Multimedia, Berkeley, CA, USA, November 2-8, 2003; 01/2003
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    ABSTRACT: Hitchcock is a semi-automatic video editing system. This video shows users collaboratively authoring a home video.
    Proceedings of the 10th ACM International Conference on Multimedia 2002, Juan les Pins, France, December 1-6, 2002.; 01/2002
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    ABSTRACT: Hitchcock is a system that allows users to easily create cus- tom videos from raw video shot with a standard video cam- era. In contrast to other video editing systems, Hitchcock uses automatic analysis to determine the suitability of por- tions of the raw video. Unsuitable video typically has fast or erratic camera motion. Hitchcock first analyzes video to identify the type and amount of camera motion: fast pan, slow zoom, etc. Based on this analysis, a numerical "unsuit- ability" score is computed for each frame of the video. Combined with standard editing rules, this score is used to identify clips for inclusion in the final video and to select their start and end points. To create a custom video, the user drags keyframes corresponding to the desired clips into a storyboard. Users can lengthen or shorten the clip without specifying the start and end frames explicitly. Clip lengths are balanced automatically using a spring-based algorithm. In this paper, we describe a new approach for addressing the problems non-professionals have in using existing video editing tools. Our approach is to provide the user with an interactive system for composing video that does not require manual selection of the start and end points for each video clip. The system analyzes the video to identify suitable clips, and a set of editing rules is applied to select the initial length of each clip. The user can then select clips, adjust their lengths, and determine the order in which they will be shown. This process may be divided into several steps: The video is first analyzed to determine camera motion and speed. Bad video is typically characterized by fast or erratic camera motion. Motion analysis is used to find segments of the video, or clips, that are suitable for inclusion in the final video. A keyframe for each suitable clip is displayed to the user. We provide an interface that allows the user to browse quickly through the keyframes of the entire raw video. The user then selects the desired keyframes and organizes them in a storyboard. Hitchcock creates the final video automatically by concate- nating the selected clips. Editing rules are used to optimize the length of each clip to be included. These rules represent the experience of a professional video producer and embody heuristics about clip duration and transitions. After review- ing the automatically generated video, the user can use the storyboard interface to lengthen or shorten the individual clips in cases where the rules yielded unwanted results. We conducted a user study in which we gave DV cameras to the participants to shoot some home video and had them edit the video with Hitchcock. The study was completed very recently so that only a few preliminary results are reported in this paper. In the next section, we discuss designs of video editing sys- tems that use different levels of automation. After that, we describe our approach for extracting clips from a video. We then present a user interface that supports semi-automatic video editing: the system offers a collection of clips that the user can select, adjust in length, and place in a desired order. We conclude with a discussion of the use of a spring-based
    Proceedings of the 13th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology; 01/2000