Ying Wu

Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States

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Publications (12)50.26 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: δ-Thiolactones derived from thiol-based glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors were evaluated as prodrugs. In rat liver microsomes, 2-(3-mercaptopropyl)pentanedioic acid (2-MPPA, 1) was gradually produced from 3-(2-oxo-tetrahydro-thiopyran-3-yl)propionic acid (5), a thiolactone derived from 1. Compound 1 was detected in plasma at concentrations well above its IC50 value for GCPII following oral administration of 5 in rats. Consistent with the oral plasma pharmacokinetics, thiolactone 5 exhibited efficacy in a rat model of neuropathic pain following oral administration.
    Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 12/2013; · 5.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: 2-Phosphonomethyl pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA) is a potent and selective inhibitor of glutamate carboxypeptidase-II, an enzyme which catabolizes the abundant neuropeptide N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and glutamate. 2-PMPA demonstrates robust efficacy in numerous animal models of neurological disease, however its pharmacokinetics has not yet been fully described. 2-PMPA is a highly polar compound with multiple negative charges causing significant challenges for analysis in biological matrices. Here we report a derivatization method for the acidic groups that involved protein precipitation with acetonitrile followed by reaction with N-tert-butyldimethysilyl-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). The silylated analyte with transitions (683→551.4) and the internal standard (669→537.2) were monitored by tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray positive ionization mode. The method was subsequently used to evaluate 2-PMPA pharmacokinetics in rats. Intraperitoneal administration of 100mg/kg 2-PMPA resulted in maximum concentration in plasma of 275μg/mL at 0.25h. The half-life, area under the curve, apparent clearance, and volume of distribution were 0.64h, 210μg×h/mL, 7.93mL/min/kg, and 0.44L/kg, respectively. The tissue/plasma ratios in brain, sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglion were 0.018, 0.120 and 0.142, respectively. In summary, a sensitive analytical method for 2-PMPA is reported that can be employed for similarly charged molecules.
    Journal of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis 08/2013; 88C:162-169. · 2.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) is a potential therapeutic target in neurological disorders associated with excessive activation of glutamatergic systems. The potent, orally bioavailable GCP II inhibitor 2-MPPA is effective in preclinical models of diseases where excess glutamate release is implicated, including neuropathic pain and was the first GCPII inhibitor to be administered to man. The relationship between dosing regimen, pharmacokinetics and analgesia in a neuropathic pain model were examined in rats to aid development of clinical dosing. The efficacy of oral 2MPPA in the chronic constrictive injury (CCI) model was not simply related to plasma concentrations. Even though maximal concentrations were observed within one hour of dosing, the analgesic effect took at least 8 days of daily dosing to become significant. The delay was not due to tissue drug accumulation since inhibitory concentrations of the drug were achieved in the nerve within one hour of dosing. There was also no accumulation of drug in plasma or tissue after multiple daily dosing. Effects were dependent on reaching a threshold concentration since dividing daily dose led to a loss of effect. The analgesic effect outlasted plasma exposure and was maintained for days even after daily dosing was halted. The delayed onset, dependence on threshold plasma concentration, and sustained effects after exposured support the hypothesis that an indirect, long-lived mechanism of action. While these longer lasting secondary mechanisms are not yet identified, daily clinical dosing of a rapidly eliminated GCP II inhibitor appears justified.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 06/2013; · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Eribulin mesylate (E7389, INN:eribulin mesilate Halaven(®)) is a non-taxane microtubule dynamics inhibitor currently in clinical use for advanced breast cancer. Other microtubule-targeting agents for breast cancer, including paclitaxel and ixabepilone, display a common treatment dose-limiting toxicity of peripheral neuropathy (PN). In an earlier study, we found eribulin mesylate had a lower propensity to induce PN in mice than either paclitaxel or ixabepilone. In the current study, we compared additional PN induced by paclitaxel versus eribulin mesylate when administered to mice with preexisting paclitaxel-induced PN. Initially, paclitaxel at 0.75 × its maximum tolerated dose (MTD; 22.5 mg/kg) was given on a Q2Dx3 regimen for 2 weeks. The second chemotherapy was 0.5 MTD eribulin mesylate (0.875 mg/kg) or paclitaxel (15 mg/kg) on a similar regimen, starting 2 weeks after the first. Initial paclitaxel treatment produced significant decreases in caudal nerve conduction velocity (NCV; averaging 19.5 ± 1 and 22.2 ± 1.3 %, p < 0.001) and amplitude (averaging 53.2 ± 2.6 and 72.4 ± 2.1 %, p < 0.001) versus vehicle when measured 24 h or 2 weeks after dosing cessation, respectively. Additional 0.5 MTD paclitaxel further reduced caudal NCV and amplitude relative to immediately before initiation of the second regimen (by 11 ± 2.1 and 59.2 ± 5 %, p < 0.01, respectively). In contrast, 0.5 MTD eribulin mesylate caused no further decrease in caudal NCV. In conclusion, unlike additional paclitaxel treatment, eribulin mesylate administered to mice with preexisting paclitaxel-induced PN had limited additional deleterious effects at 6 weeks. These preclinical data suggest that eribulin mesylate may have reduced tendency to exacerbate preexisting paclitaxel-induced PN in clinical settings.
    Neurotoxicity Research 04/2013; · 2.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Peripheral neuropathy from nerve trauma is a significant problem in the human population and often constitutes a dose limiting toxicity in patients receiving chemotherapy. E2072 is a potent (Ki=10 nM), selective and orally available inhibitor of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII). Here, we report that E2072 attenuates hyperalgesia and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) deficits in preclinical rodent models of neuropathic pain and oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. In the chronic constrictive injury (CCI) model, orally administered E2072 reversed pre-existing thermal hyperalgesia in rats in a dose-dependent fashion, with a minimally effective dose of 0.1 mg/kg/day. Interestingly, multiple days of dosing of E2072 were required before analgesia was realized even though GCPII inhibitory exposures were achieved on the first day of dosing. In addition, analgesia was found to persist for up to 7 days after cessation of dosing, consistent with E2072's pharmacokinetic profile and sustained exposure. Furthermore, in a chronic oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy model, (6 mg/kg oxaliplatin ip twice weekly for 4 weeks), female BALB/C mice receiving daily oral E2072 at 1.0 and 0.1 mg/kg displayed no deficits in either caudal or digital velocity compared to significant deficits observed in oxaliplatin alone-treated mice (12±3% and 9±2% respectively). Similar findings were seen with oxaliplatin-induced digital and caudal amplitude deficits. Importantly, E2072 showed no interference with the antineoplastic efficacy of oxaliplatin in mice bearing leukemia (L1210), even at doses 100 times its neuroprotective/analgesic dose, indicating a selective effect on neuropathy. These data support the therapeutic utility of GCPII inhibitors in neuropathy and neuropathic pain.
    Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics 09/2012; · 3.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: d-Amino acid oxidase (DAAO) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of d-amino acids including d-serine, a full agonist at the glycine modulatory site of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. To evaluate the significance of DAAO-mediated metabolism in the pharmacokinetics of oral d-serine, plasma d-serine levels were measured in both wild-type mice and transgenic mice lacking DAAO. Although d-serine levels were rapidly diminished in wild-type mice (t(&frac12;) = 1.2 h), sustained drug levels over the course of 4 h (t(&frac12;) > 10 h) were observed in mice lacking DAAO. Coadministration of d-serine with 6-chlorobenzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO), a small-molecule DAAO inhibitor, in wild-type mice resulted in the enhancement of plasma d-serine levels, although CBIO seems to have only temporary effects on the plasma d-serine levels due to glucuronidation of the key hydroxyl group. These findings highlight the predominant role of DAAO in the clearance of d-serine from the systemic circulation. Thus, a potent DAAO inhibitor with a longer half-life should be capable of maintaining high plasma d-serine levels over a sustained period of time and might have therapeutic implications for the treatment of schizophrenia.
    Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals 07/2012; 40(11):2067-73. · 3.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A series of thiol-based glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors have been synthesized with either a 3-(mercaptomethyl)benzoic acid or 2-(2-mercaptoethyl)benzoic acid scaffold. Potent inhibitors were identified from each of the two scaffolds with IC(50) values in the single-digit nanomolar range, including 2-(3-carboxybenzyloxy)-5-(mercaptomethyl)benzoic acid 27c and 3-(2-mercaptoethyl)biphenyl-2,3'-dicarboxylic acid 35c. Compound 35c was found to be metabolically stable and selective over a number of targets related to glutamate-mediated neurotransmission. Furthermore, compound 35c was found to be orally available in rats and exhibited efficacy in an animal model of neuropathic pain following oral administration.
    Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 05/2012; 55(12):5922-32. · 5.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: D-Serine administration has been shown to be effective for the treatment of schizophrenia symptoms. However, D-Serine must be administered at high doses to observe clinical effects. This is due in large part to D-Serine undergoing oxidation by D-Serine acid oxidase (DAAO) before it reaches the brain. Consequently, coadministration of D-Serine with a DAAO inhibitor has been suggested as a way to lower the dose of D-serine required to treat schizophrenia. During the characterization of DAAO inhibitors as potential drugs, inhibitors are evaluated in rodents for their ability to increase plasma D-Serine levels after oral coadministration. Current high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based methodologies to measure D-Serine in plasma are time-consuming and are not amenable to concomitant analysis of multiple samples. We report the characterization of a 96-well format assay to monitor D-Serine in plasma that greatly expedites analysis time. The assay involves the use of strong cation exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) to isolate D-Serine from plasma followed by quantitation of D-Serine using the DAAO-catalyzed reaction. Plasma D-Serine determination using this assay could also be used as pharmacodynamic marker and as biomarker.
    Analytical Biochemistry 08/2011; 419(2):106-9. · 2.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity is a significant problem associated with successful treatment of many cancers. Tubulin is a well-established target of antineoplastic therapy; however, tubulin-targeting agents, such as paclitaxel and the newer epothilones, induce significant neurotoxicity. Eribulin mesylate, a novel microtubule-targeting analogue of the marine natural product halichondrin B, has recently shown antineoplastic activity, with relatively low incidence and severity of neuropathy, in metastatic breast cancer patients. The mechanism of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy is not well understood. One of the main underlying reasons is incomplete characterization of pathology of peripheral nerves from treated subjects, either from patients or preclinically from animals. The current study was conducted to directly compare, in mice, the neuropathy-inducing propensity of three drugs: paclitaxel, ixabepilone, and eribulin mesylate. Because these drugs have different potencies and pharmacokinetics, we compared them on the basis of a maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Effects of each drug on caudal and digital nerve conduction velocity, nerve amplitude, and sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglion morphology at 0.25 × MTD, 0.5 × MTD, 0.75 × MTD, and MTD were compared. Paclitaxel and ixabepilone, at their respective MTDs, produced significant deficits in caudal nerve conduction velocity, caudal amplitude and digital nerve amplitudes, as well as moderate to severe degenerative pathologic changes in dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerve. In contrast, eribulin mesylate produced no significant deleterious effects on any nerve conduction parameter measured and caused milder, less frequent effects on morphology. Overall, our findings indicate that eribulin mesylate induces less neuropathy in mice than paclitaxel or ixabepilone at equivalent MTD-based doses.
    Cancer Research 06/2011; 71(11):3952-62. · 9.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: GCP II inhibition decreases extracellular excitotoxic glutamate and increases extracellular NAAG, both of which provide neuroprotection. We have demonstrated with our potent and selective GCP II inhibitors efficacy in models of stroke, ALS and neuropathic pain. GCP II inhibition may have significant potential benefits over existing glutamate-based neuroprotection strategies. The upstream mechanism seems selective for excitotoxic induced glutamate release, as GCP II inhibitors in normal animals induced no change in basal glutamate. This suggestion has recently been corroborated by Lieberman and coworkers24 who found that both NAAG release and increase in GCP II activity appear to be induced by electrical stimulation in crayfish nerve fibers and that subsequent NAAG hydrolysis to glutamate contributes, at least in part, to subsequent NMDA receptor activation. Interestingly, even at relatively high doses of compounds, GCP II inhibition did not appear to be associated with learning/memory deficits in animals. Additionally, quantitative neurophysiological testing data and visual analog scales for 'psychedelic effects' in Phase I single dose and repeat dose studies showed GCP II inhibition to be safe and well tolerated by both healthy volunteers and diabetic patients. GCP II inhibition may represent a novel glutamate regulating strategy devoid of the side effects that have hampered the development of postsynaptic glutamate receptor antagonists.
    Advances in experimental medicine and biology 02/2006; 576:327-37; discussion 361-3. · 1.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV) is a ubiquitous membrane-bound enzyme that cleaves the two N-terminal amino acids from peptides with a proline or alanine residue in the second position from the amino end. Potential substrates for DPP IV include several neuropeptides, suggesting a role for DPP IV in neurological processes. We have developed a potent DPP IV inhibitor (IC50 = 30 nM), 1-(2-amino-3-methyl-butyryl)-azetidine-2-carbonitrile (AMAC), which has shown efficacy in two established models of psychosis: mescaline-induced scratching and amphetamine-induced hyperactivity. In the mescaline-induced scratching model, AMAC treatment before mescaline administration reduced the number of scratching paroxysms by 68% (P < 0.01). The compound showed a dose-dependent effect, inhibiting significantly at 6, 20 and 60 mg/kg (37%, 39% and 68%, respectively). In the amphetamine-induced hyperactivity model, 50 and 60 mg/kg AMAC, given before injection of amphetamine, significantly reduced hyper-locomotion by 65% and 76%, respectively. Additionally, AMAC showed no significant activity in binding assays for 20 receptors thought to be involved in the pathology of schizophrenia, including dopamine, serotonin and glutamate. A structurally similar analog, 1-(2-dimethylamino-3-methyl-butyryl)-azetidine-2-carbonitrile (DAMAC), that does not inhibit DPP IV, was inactive in both models. Taken together, these data suggest that the antipsychotic effects of AMAC are the result of DPP IV inhibition.
    Brain Research 06/2005; 1048(1-2):177-84. · 2.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two representative glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II) inhibitors, 2-(hydroxypentafluorophenylmethyl-phosphinoylmethyl)pentanedioic acid 2 and 2-(3-mercaptopropyl)pentanedioic acid 3, were synthesized in high optical purities (>97%ee). The two enantiomers of 2 were prepared from previously reported chiral intermediates, (R)- and (S)-2-(hydroxyphosphinoylmethyl)pentanedioic acid benzyl esters 8. The synthesis of (R)- and (S)-3 involves the hydrolysis of (R)- and (S)-3-(2-oxo-tetrahydro-thiopyran-3-yl)propionic acids, (R)- and (S)-11, the corresponding optically pure thiolactones delivered by chiral chromatographic separation of the racemic 11. GCP II inhibitory assay revealed that (S)-2 is 40-fold more potent than (R)-2. In contrast, both enantiomers of 3 inhibited GCP II with nearly equal potency. The efficacy observed in subsequent animal studies with these enantiomers correlated well with the inhibitory potency in a GCP II assay.
    Journal of Medicinal Chemistry 04/2005; 48(7):2319-24. · 5.61 Impact Factor