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Publications (7)20.89 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Powerful mutagens are formed during the broiling or frying of meat. These mutagens cause specific cancers in animal models, and epidemiological studies suggest that they increase the risk of breast and colon cancer. It is important, therefore, to inhibit the formation of these mutagens. Application of tea polyphenols, polyphenon 60 from green tea, and polyphenon B from black tea, to both surfaces of ground beef before cooking inhibits the formation of the mutagens in a dose-related fashion. This procedure is simple and effective, and utilizes inexpensive tea, a product that deserves consideration for practical use.
    Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis 05/2002; 516(1-2):19-22. · 3.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary heart disease and many types of cancer are important diseases in the world and especially in Western countries. There are biochemical activation processes for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and genotoxic carcinogens to reactive products. In part, these also involve the generation of active oxygen and reactive oxygen species. We investigated the effect of a natural product, MitoLife, which contains a mixture of fruit and tea extracts, on the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and the mutagenicity of five genotoxic carcinogens, specifically, 2-acetylaminofluorene, 2-aminoanthracene, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline, aflatoxin B(1), and benzo[a]pyrene. A positive antioxidant control, polyphenon 60, a concentrate of green-tea polyphenols, was used to compare the effect of MitoLife with that of polyphenon. MitoLife displayed inhibiting effects in all series of tests at slightly lower effectiveness but with the same order of magnitude as the green-tea polyphenol product. Thus, MitoLife represents another means to decrease adverse effects associated with the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol or of a series of carcinogens, some of which are in the human environment.
    Nutrition 05/2001; 17(4):322-5. · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary heart disease and many types of cancer are important diseases in the world and especially in Western countries. There are biochemical activation processes for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and genotoxic carcinogens to reactive products. In part, these also involve the generation of active oxygen and reactive oxygen species. We investigated the effect of a natural product, MitoLife, which contains a mixture of fruit and tea extracts, on the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and the mutagenicity of five genotoxic carcinogens, specifically, 2-acetylaminofluorene, 2-aminoanthracene, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline, aflatoxin B1, and benzo[a]pyrene. A positive antioxidant control, polyphenon 60, a concentrate of green-tea polyphenols, was used to compare the effect of MitoLife with that of polyphenon. MitoLife displayed inhibiting effects in all series of tests at slightly lower effectiveness but with the same order of magnitude as the green-tea polyphenol product. Thus, MitoLife represents another means to decrease adverse effects associated with the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol or of a series of carcinogens, some of which are in the human environment.
    Nutrition. 01/2001; 17(4):322-325.
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    ABSTRACT: A micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEKC) method for the simultaneous analysis of five tea catechins, theanine, caffeine, gallic acid and ascorbic acid has been developed. The catechins are (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin, (-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechin gallate and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate. p-Nitrophenol serves as both reference and internal standard. All the components are separated within 13 min with a 57 cm uncoated fused-silica column. On-column detection was carried out at 200 nm. This method has been used to measure these compounds in fresh tea leaves and tea liquor. The limit of detection for all analytes ranged from 1 to 20 microg/ml.
    Journal of Chromatography A 05/2000; 876(1-2):235-42. · 4.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aqueous solutions of gallic acid, methyl gallate, catechins, theaflavins and tannic acid were tested for inhibition of the mutagenicity of PhIP in the Salmonella typhimurium TA98 assay with an S9 fraction from the liver of rats induced with alpha-naphthoflavone and phenobarbital. The IC50S were in the 80-250 microM range for the gallated catechins, theaflavins and tannic acid. No inhibition could be found with these compounds when a direct acting mutagen was used. This indicates that the anti-mutagenic properties of these phenolic compounds may be due to their inhibition of the cytochrome P-450 enzymes.
    Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis 04/1997; 389(2-3):167-72. · 3.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Some epidemiological studies have associated tea drinking with several health benefits, while other such studies have been inconclusive. The liver enzyme, xanthine oxidase (XO) produces uric acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the catabolism of purines. Excess of the former can lead to gout and of the latter to increased oxidative stress, mutagenesis and possibly cancer. Polyphenols are antioxidants, and it has been suggested that they can reduce oxidative stress by their antioxidant properties. We report here on the inhibition of XO by five tea catechins and two flavones. The Ki values (microM) and types of inhibition were catechin (C) (Ki = 303.95, uncompetitive), epicatechin (EC) (Ki = 20.48, mixed), epigallocatechin (EGC) (Ki = 10.66, mixed), epicatechin gallate (ECg) (Ki = 2.86, mixed) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) (Ki = 0.76, competitive). The Ki of EGCg was similar to that of allopurinol (Ki = 0.30, mixed), the drug of choice for inhibition of XO in gout patients. Thus, tea catechins may act at.an earlier stage than has previously been suspected, by inhibiting ROS production, rather than only neutralizing the already formed ROS. This suggests a new mechanism whereby tea drinking may prevent oxidative stress related diseases, e.g. atherosclerosis and cancer.
    Anticancer research 01/1997; 17(6D):4381-5. · 1.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research suggested that the mutagenicity of some genotoxic carcinogens, mainly heterocyclic amines, was decreased by green or black tea extracts, or tea polyphenol fractions. Thus, it seemed important to test a variety of genotoxic carcinogens with distinct chemical structures and means of biochemical activation as regards modification of mutagenicity in appropriate strains of Salmonella typhimurium by 3 concentrations of polyphenols 60, 100, or B, standard commercial polyphenol preparations from green or black tea. Polyphenols sharply decreased the mutagenicity of a number of aryl- and heterocyclic amines, of aflatoxin B1, benzo[a]pyrene, 1,2-dibromoethane, and more selectively, of 2-nitropropane, all involving an induced rat liver S9 fraction. Good inhibition was found with 2 nitrosamines that required a hamster S9 fraction for biochemical activation. No effect was found with 1-nitropyrene, and with the direct-acting (no S9) 2-chloro-4-methyl-thiobutanoic acid. Thus, with some exceptions, polyphenols considerably decreased the mutagenicity of diverse types of carcinogens.
    Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis 12/1996; 371(1-2):57-63. · 3.90 Impact Factor