Z Y Wang

Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Sheng, China

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Publications (4)8.14 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This prospective, randomized controlled study evaluated the effects of acute hypervolaemic haemodilution (AHH) on the expression of plasma interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) and bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) in patients undergoing elective total hip replacement. Twenty patients were randomized to receive an infusion of either hydroxyethyl starch (HES group) or lactated Ringer's solution (LR group) immediately after anaesthesia. Plasma concentrations of IP-10 and BPI were measured before anaesthesia (baseline), at the start of surgery, 30 min after the start of surgery and at the end of surgery. Blood loss and the volume of blood transfused were significantly lower in the HES group compared with the LR group. Compared with baseline, IP-10 and BPI concentrations increased significantly in both groups 30 min after the start of surgery. The IP-10 concentrations were significantly lower and BPI concentrations significantly higher in the HES group compared with the LR group 30 min after the start of surgery and at the end of surgery. It is concluded that AHH with HES may be helpful in ameliorating immune function during total hip replacement and in reducing blood loss and the extent of blood transfusion.
    The Journal of international medical research 10/2009; 37(5):1450-6. · 0.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Analgesics are commonly used to provide pain relief after surgery. These drugs produce some extended depression of immunity. A prospective randomized controlled trial was designed to observe expressions of T-lymphocyte subsets (CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+)), natural-killer cells (CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+)), and activated T-lymphocytes (CD3(+)CD25(+)) of patients undergoing gastric cancer surgeries and receiving patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (PCIA). Forty-five patients undergoing elective gastric cancer surgeries under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into 3 groups. Group I received PCIA using morphine after surgery, group II using tramadol, and group III using tramadol with lornoxicam. The analgesic efficacy was evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS) and Bruggrmann comfort scale (BCS). Expressions of CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+), CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+), and CD3(+)CD25(+) were measured as percentages of total lymphocytes by flow cytometer at 5 time points. There was no significant difference in analgesic efficacy and the baselines of CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+), CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+), and CD3(+)CD25(+) in all groups. Compared with the baseline, CD3(+)CD8(+) had no changes in all groups at any time point. Ninety minutes after incision, CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+), and CD3(+)CD25(+) were lower in all groups (P<0.05). 24 h after surgery, CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+), and CD3(+)CD25(+) were lower in group I and group II (P<0.05); meanwhile CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), and CD3(+)CD25(+) returned to the baseline but CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+) was still low (P<0.05) in group III. 48 h after surgery, CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+), and CD3(+)CD25(+) returned to the baseline in group II and group III, but not in group I (P<0.05). 72 h after surgery, CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD4(+)/CD3(+)CD8(+) returned to the baseline, but CD3(+)CD25(+) and CD3(-)CD16(+)CD56(+) were still low in group I (P<0.05). PCIA using lornoxicam with tramadol has the same good analgesic efficacy and less immunity depression than PCIA using morphine or tramadol.
    Clinica Chimica Acta 07/2006; 369(1):40-5. · 2.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Local anesthetic containing epinephrine is commonly used in many operations for the main purpose of hemostasis. A randomized, controlled, prospective clinical trial was designed to find out hemodynamic changes after local infiltration of different concentrations and/or different dosages of epinephrine during functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) under general anesthesia. One hundred and eight adult patients undergoing elective FESS under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into four groups. Group I received 2% lidocaine 2 ml with epinephrine (5 microg/ml); group II received 1% lidocaine 4 ml with epinephrine (2.5 microg/ml); group III received 1% lidocaine 4 ml with epinephrine (5 microg/ml); and group IV received 1% lidocaine 4 ml for local infiltration. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were monitored continuously in the radial artery and recorded in 6 min: before infiltration (baseline), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 5, and 6 min after local infiltration. The lowest blood pressure (BP) in this period was also recorded. Significant hemodynamic changes, particularly a decrease in BP (P < 0.001) with a slight increase in HR (P < 0.001) at approximately 1.5 min and an increase in SBP at approximately 3 min (P < 0.01) after local infiltration, were observed in group I, group II and group III compared with the baseline, but not in group IV. No significant hemodynamic differences were observed between group I, group II and group III at the same time points (P > 0.05). Local infiltration of low-dose epinephrine causes temporary significant hemodynamic changes particularly a marked decrease in BP during FESS under general anesthesia.
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 12/2005; 49(10):1471-6. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Local anesthetics containing adrenaline, which often cause cardiovascular side effects, are routinely used in functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) for the main purpose of hemostasis. The controversies concerning hemodynamic effects of adrenaline in local infiltration are widely discussed, but there is no definite conclusion. A prospective, randomized, double-blinded study was carried out to discover the hemodynamic effects after local infiltration of 1:200,000 adrenaline contained in 2% lidocaine under general anesthesia. Seventy-six adult patients undergoing FESS during general anesthesia were allocated randomly into three groups. Group I patients (n = 26) received 2% lidocaine 2 mL with adrenaline (1:200,000), group II patients (n = 25) received saline 2 mL with adrenaline (1:200,000), and group III patients (control group, n = 25) received saline 2 mL without adrenaline for local infiltration. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and heart rate (HR) were monitored simultaneously; systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were directly measured in radial artery continuously after local infiltration. SBP, DBP, MAP, and HR were recorded at 10 time points: before infiltration (baseline), 0.5 minutes, 1 minute, 1.5 minutes, 2 minutes, 2.5 minutes, 3 minutes, 3.5 minutes, 4 minute, and 5 minutes after infiltration. Significant hemodynamic changes, particularly hypotension (P < .01), after local infiltration were observed in group I and group II compared with the baseline, but not in group III. However, there were no significant hemodynamic changes between group I and group II at the same time points (P > .05). The significant hemodynamic changes lasted no longer than 4 minutes. Lidocaine (2%) or saline with adrenaline (1:200,000) does cause temporary hypotension and other hemodynamic changes during general anesthesia, which last no longer than 4 minutes. The causative mechanism is caused by the effect of adrenaline. This is a preliminary study.
    The Laryngoscope 03/2005; 115(2):348-52. · 1.98 Impact Factor