Helge Kampen

Friedrich Loeffler Institute, Griefswald, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany

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Publications (65)117.4 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Among the invasive mosquitoes registered all over the world, Aedes species are particularly frequent and important. As several of them are potential vectors of disease, they present significant health concerns for 21st century Europe. Five species have established in mainland Europe, with two (Aedes albopictus and Aedes japonicus) becoming widespread and two (Ae. albopictus and Aedes aegypti) implicated in disease transmission to humans in Europe. The routes of importation and spread are often enigmatic, the ability to adapt to local environments and climates are rapid, and the biting nuisance and vector potential are both an ecomonic and public health concern. Europeans are used to cases of dengue and chikungunya in travellers returning from the tropics, but the threat to health and tourism in mainland Europe is substantive. Coupled to that are the emerging issues in the European overseas territorities and this paper is the first to consider the impacts in the remoter outposts of Europe. If entomologists and public health authorities are to address the spread of these mosquitoes and mitigate their health risks they must first be prepared to share information to better understand their biology and ecology, and share data on their distribution and control successes. This paper focusses in greater detail on the entomological and ecological aspects of these mosquitoes to assist with the risk assessment process, bringing together a large amount of information gathered through the ECDC VBORNET project.
    Bulletin of Entomological Research 03/2015; DOI:10.1017/S0007485315000103 · 1.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Originally native to East Asia, Aedes japonicus japonicus, a potential vector of several arboviruses, has become one of the most invasive mosquito species in the world. After having established in the USA, it is now spreading in Europe, with new populations emerging. In contrast to the USA, the introduction pathways and modes of dispersal in Europe are largely obscure.Methods To find out if two recently detected populations of Ae. j. japonicus in The Netherlands and northern Germany go back to new importations or to movements within Europe, the genetic makeup of mosquito specimens from all known European populations was compared. For this purpose, seven microsatellite loci from a representative number of mosquito specimens were genotyped and part of their mitochondrial nad4 gene sequenced.ResultsA novel nad4 haplotype found in the newly discovered Dutch population of Ae. j. japonicus suggests that this population is not closely related to the other European populations but has emanated from a further introduction event. With five nad4 haplotypes, the Dutch population also shows a very high genetic diversity indicating that either the founder population was very large or multiple introductions took place. By contrast, the recently detected North German population could be clearly assigned to one of the two previously determined European Ae. j. japonicus microsatellite genotypes and shows nad4 haplotypes that are known from West Germany.Conclusion As the European populations of Ae. j. japonicus are geographically separated but genetically mixed, their establishment must be attributed to passive transportation. In addition to intercontinental shipment, it can be assumed that human activities are also responsible for medium- and short-distance overland spread. A better understanding of the processes underlying the introduction and spread of this invasive species will help to increase public awareness of the human-mediated displacement of mosquitoes and to find strategies to avoid it.
    Parasites & Vectors 01/2015; 8(1):40. DOI:10.1186/s13071-015-0648-1 · 3.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The interplay between global warming and invasive arthropods in temperate zones is of utmost interest in terms of the potential expansions of vector-borne diseases. During the last years, Aedes japonicus, an aedine vector mosquito native in Korea, Japan, Taiwan, southern China and Russia, was found in Switzerland, Germany and the Netherlands. Here, we modelled climatically suitable areas for the establishment of Aedes japonicus in Europe during the upcoming century using an ensemble of different modelling algorithms and a set of five different global climate models (biomod2; cesm1_bgc, fio_esm, giss_e2_r, inm_cm4, mpi_esm_lr; IPCC 5 scenarios rcp 4.5 and rcp 8.5). In parallel, we detected low temperature thresholds for Aedes japonicus egg survival under in a climate chamber experiment. We observe that the minimum temperature act as a stronger ecological constraint than the duration or diurnal temperature range of the treatment. Finally, we combined the outcome of the experimental procedures and species distribution models to substantially improve the compilation of risk maps by considering areas where an establishment of Aedes japonicus is unlikely due to winter conditions.
    7th International Conference of the International Biogeography Society IBS2015, Bayreuth, Germany; 01/2015
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    ABSTRACT: The recent emergence in Europe of invasive mosquitoes and mosquito-borne disease associated with both invasive and native mosquito species has prompted intensified mosquito vector research in most European countries. Central to the efforts are mosquito monitoring and surveillance activities in order to assess the current species occurrence, distribution and, when possible, abundance, in order to permit the early detection of invasive species and the spread of competent vectors. As active mosquito collection, e.g. by trapping adults, dipping preimaginal developmental stages or ovitrapping, is usually cost-, time- and labour-intensive and can cover only small parts of a country, passive data collection approaches are gradually being integrated into monitoring programmes. Thus, scientists in several EU member states have recently initiated programmes for mosquito data collection and analysis that make use of sources other than targeted mosquito collection. While some of them extract mosquito distribution data from zoological databases established in other contexts, community-based approaches built upon the recognition, reporting, collection and submission of mosquito specimens by citizens are becoming more and more popular and increasingly support scientific research. Based on such reports and submissions, new populations, extended or new distribution areas and temporal activity patterns of invasive and native mosquito species were found. In all cases, extensive media work and communication with the participating individuals or groups was fundamental for success. The presented projects demonstrate that passive approaches are powerful tools to survey the mosquito fauna in order to supplement active mosquito surveillance strategies and render them more focused. Their ability to continuously produce biological data permits the early recognition of changes in the mosquito fauna that may have an impact on biting nuisance and the risk of pathogen transmission associated with mosquitoes. International coordination to explore synergies and increase efficiency of passive surveillance programmes across borders needs to be established.
    Parasites & Vectors 01/2015; 8(1):9. DOI:10.1186/PREACCEPT-1758085154145031 · 3.25 Impact Factor
  • Doreen Werner, Helge Kampen
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    ABSTRACT: Larvae, pupae and eggs of the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus were found in Freiburg, southern Germany, after submission of an adult mosquito specimen from that area to the 'Mückenatlas', a German instrument of passive mosquito surveillance. While previously collected Ae. albopictus in Germany were trapped on, or close to, service stations on motorways, suggesting introduction by vehicles from southern Europe, these new specimens were out of flight distance from the motorway on the one hand and indicate local reproduction on the other. The findings call for a thorough active and passive surveillance in exposed geographic regions such as the relatively warm German Upper Rhine Valley to prevent Ae. albopictus from establishing.
    Parasitology Research 12/2014; 114(3). DOI:10.1007/s00436-014-4244-7 · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus, originally restricted to temperate East Asia, is now widespread in North America and more recently has become established in Europe. To ascertain the putative number of separate introductions to Europe and examine patterns of expansion we analyzed the genetic makeup of Ae. j. japonicus populations from five cemeteries in North Rhine-Westphalia and Rhineland-Palatinate, two western German federal states, as well as of specimens from populations in Belgium, Switzerland, and Austria/Slovenia. To do so, we genotyped individual specimens at seven pre-existing polymorphic microsatellite loci and sequenced part of the nad4 mitochondrial locus. We found evidence of two different genotypic signatures associated with different nad4 mitochondrial haplotypes, indicating at least two genetically differentiated populations of Ae. j. japonicus in Europe (i.e. two distinct genotypes). Belgian, Swiss, and Austrian/Slovenian populations all share the same genotypic signature although they have become differentiated since isolation. Contrary to expectations, the German Ae. j. japonicus are not closely related to those in Belgium which are geographically nearest but are also highly inbred. German populations have a unique genotype but also evidence of mixing between the two genotypes. Also unexpectedly, the populations closest to the center of the German infestation had the highest levels of admixture indicating that separate introductions did not expand and merge but instead their expansion was driven by punctuated human-mediated transport. Critically, the resulting admixed populations have higher genetic diversity and appear invasive as indicated by their increased abundance and recent spread across western Germany.
    PLoS ONE 07/2014; 9(7):e99093. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0099093 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: After the repeated demonstration of Dirofilaria repens infections in German dogs, D. repens and Dirofilaria immitis DNA was detected in mosquitoes trapped in 2011, 2012 and 2013 in northeastern and southwestern Germany within the framework of culicid monitoring projects. As temperature is the most important factor dictating the extrinsic development of dirofilarial larvae in the potential vector, data of the German Weather Service (DWD) were analysed for the regions where the positive mosquitoes had been collected. Based on the mean daily temperatures recorded by weather stations most closely to the collection sites of the mosquitoes, it can be concluded that the mosquitoes were trapped in time periods that allowed for the completion of the developmental cycle of the worms in the mosquitoes and a subsequent transmission to a vertebrate host. The results of this study confirm the principal climatic suitability of certain German regions for the establishment of natural dirofilarial transmission cycles. Moreover, the theoretical climatic considerations, together with findings of D. repens infections in German dogs and mosquitoes, strongly suggest that the continuing spread of at least D. repens from its traditional habitats in the Mediterranean has reached southwestern and northeastern Germany.
    Parasitology Research 06/2014; 113(8). DOI:10.1007/s00436-014-3970-1 · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BackgroundBiting midges of the genus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of internationally important arboviruses. To understand the role of Culicoides in the transmission of these viruses, it is essential to correctly identify the species involved. Within the western Palaearctic region, the main suspected vector species, C. obsoletus, C. scoticus, C. dewulfi and C. chiopterus, have similar wing patterns, which makes it difficult to separate and identify them correctly.MethodsIn this study, designed as an inter-laboratory ring trial with twelve partners from Europe and North Africa, we assess four PCR-based assays which are used routinely to differentiate the four species of Culicoides listed above. The assays based on mitochondrial or ribosomal DNA or microarray hybridisation were tested using aliquots of Culicoides DNA (extracted using commercial kits), crude lysates of ground specimens and whole Culicoides (265 individuals), and non-Culicoides Ceratopogonidae (13 individuals) collected from across Europe.ResultsA total of 800 molecular assays were implemented. The in-house assays functioned effectively, although specificity and sensitivity varied according to the molecular marker and DNA extraction method used. The Obsoletus group specificity was overall high (95-99%) while the sensitivity varied greatly (59.6-100%). DNA extraction methods impacted the sensitivity of the assays as well as the type of sample used as template for the DNA extraction.ConclusionsThe results are discussed in terms of current use of species diagnostic assays and the future development of molecular tools for the rapid differentiation of cryptic Culicoides species.
    Parasites & Vectors 05/2014; 7:223. DOI:10.1186/1756-3305-7-223 · 3.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In January 2013, a female mosquito collected during the week 18th-25th July 2012 in Lelystad (The Netherlands) during routine national vector surveillance was morphologically identified and genetically confirmed as the Asian bush mosquito, Aedes japonicus japonicus. In order to assess the extent of the infestation area, subsequent extensive mosquito surveillance in the surrounding area during 2013 consisted of visual inspection of potential habitats and adult trapping in increasing radially around the location of the initial finding. This surveillance confirmed the existence of a widely established population of Ae. j. japonicus in the municipality of Lelystad. Despite this detection, it was decided not to implement any mosquito control measures for two reasons: this would require large scale biocidal treatment and community participation in order to be effective, and this species is not a confirmed vector of disease agents in the field. As an alternative, it was decided that community information would be provided to enable management measures such as larval habitat source reduction.
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    ABSTRACT: Based primarily on nucleotide polymorphisms in the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of the ribosomal DNA, Anopheles daciae was recently described as an additional member of the Maculipennis Group of species, separate from Anopheles messeae with which it had previously been confused due to morphological and genetic similarity. Species differentiation between A. messeae and A. daciae was possible only by ITS2 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by DNA sequencing or RFLP analysis. In addition to its siblings, Anopheles maculipennis, Anopheles atroparvus and A. messeae, A. daciae has been shown to occur in Germany, although with limited distribution. We here describe additional collection sites for this species in Germany, showing concentrations in East Germany and the northern Upper Rhine Valley in Southwest Germany. A species-specific multiplex PCR assay is presented that is able to differentiate the four Maculipennis Group sibling species occurring in Germany plus Anopheles sacharovi, Anopheles melanoon and Anopheles labranchiae. The correct identification and detailed knowledge of the biology of A. daciae are of relevance since it might be a vector of disease agents, as suggested by the vector potential of its siblings and the recent finding of an A. daciae female infected with Dirofilaria repens in southern Germany.
    Parasitology Research 04/2014; 113(6). DOI:10.1007/s00436-014-3857-1 · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the past decade, two pathogens transmitted by Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), bluetongue virus and Schmallenberg virus, have caused serious economic losses to the European livestock industry, most notably affecting sheep and cattle. These outbreaks of arboviral disease have highlighted large knowledge gaps on the biology and ecology of indigenous Culicoides species. With these research gaps in mind, and as a means of assessing what potential disease outbreaks to expect in the future, an international workshop was held in May 2013 at Wageningen University, The Netherlands. It brought together research groups from Belgium, France, Germany, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom and The Netherlands, with diverse backgrounds in vector ecology, epidemiology, entomology, virology, animal health, modelling, and genetics. Here, we report on the key findings of this workshop.
    BMC Veterinary Research 03/2014; 10(1):77. DOI:10.1186/1746-6148-10-77 · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    Helge Kampen, Doreen Werner
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    ABSTRACT: The Asian bush or rock pool mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus is one of the most expansive culicid species of the world. Being native to East Asia, this species was detected out of its original distribution range for the first time in the early 1990s in New Zealand where it could not establish, though. In 1998, established populations were reported from the eastern US, most likely as a result of introductions several years earlier. After a massive spread the mosquito is now widely distributed in eastern North America including Canada and two US states on the western coast. In the year 2000, it was demonstrated for the first time in Europe, continental France, but could be eliminated. A population that had appeared in Belgium in 2002 was not controlled until 2012 as it did not propagate. In 2008, immature developmental stages were discovered in a large area in northern Switzerland and bordering parts of Germany. Subsequent studies in Germany showed a wide distribution and several populations of the mosquito in various federal states. Also in 2011, the species was found in southeastern Austria (Styria) and neighbouring Slovenia. In 2013, a population was detected in the Central Netherlands, specimens were collected in southern Alsace, France, and the complete northeastern part of Slovenia was found colonized, with specimens also present across borders in adjacent Croatia. Apparently, at the end of 2013 a total of six populations occurred in Europe although it is not clear whether all of them are completely isolated. Similarly, it is not known whether these populations go back to the same number of introductions. While entry ports and long-distance continental migration routes are also obscure, it is likely that the international used tyre trade is the most important mode of intercontinental transportation of the mosquito. Aedes j. japonicus does not only display an aggressive biting behaviour but is suspected to be a vector of various disease agents and to displace indigenous culicid species. Therefore, Aedes j. japonicus might both cause public health problems in the future and have a significant impact on the biodiversity of the invaded territories.
    Parasites & Vectors 02/2014; 7(1):59. DOI:10.1186/1756-3305-7-59 · 3.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: As a result of globalization and climate change, Dirofilaria immitis and Dirofilaria repens, the causative agents of dirofilariosis in Europe, continue to spread from endemic areas in the Mediterranean to northern and northeastern regions of Europe where autochthonous cases of dirofilarial infections have increasingly been observed in dogs and humans. Whilst D. repens was recently reported from mosquitoes in putatively non-endemic areas, D. immitis has never been demonstrated in mosquitoes from Europe outside the Mediterranean. From 2011 to 2013, mosquitoes collected within the framework of a German national mosquito monitoring programme were screened for filarial nematodes using a newly designed filarioid-specific real-time PCR assay. Positive samples were further processed by conventional PCR amplification of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, amplicons were sequenced and sequences blasted against GenBank. Approximately 17,000 female mosquitoes were subjected to filarial screening. Out of 955 pools examined, nine tested positive for filariae. Two of the COI sequences indicated D. immitis, one D. repens and four Setaria tundra. Two sequences could not be assigned to a known species due to a lack of similar GenBank entries. Whilst D. immitis and the unknown parasites were detected in Culex pipiens/torrentium, D. repens was found in a single Anopheles daciae and all S. tundra were demonstrated in Aedes vexans. All positive mosquitoes were collected between mid-June and early September. The finding of dirofilariae in German mosquitoes implies the possibility of a local natural transmission cycle. While the routes of introduction to Germany and the origin of the filariae cannot be determined retrospectively, potential culicid vectors and reservoir hosts must prospectively be identified and awareness among physicians, veterinarians and public health personnel be created. The health impact of S. tundra on the indigenous cervid fauna needs further investigation.
    Parasites & Vectors 01/2014; 7(1):30. DOI:10.1186/1756-3305-7-30 · 3.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although very rare under natural conditions, anomalies of phenotypic sexual expression have been described for individuals of numerous families of the Diptera, including mosquitoes (Culicidae). Gynandromorphism and intersexualism are sexual aberrations generating individuals either with both male and female or with intermediate sexual characteristics. Here we describe five cases of gynandromorphism in three mosquito species. In addition, a list of species of the family Culicidae for which gynandromorphs and intersexes have been described in the literature is compiled.
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    ABSTRACT: Der „Mückenatlas” – www.mueckenatlas.de – ist ein Erfolgsbeispiel für das sogenannte Citizen Science, also Wissenschaft mit Bürgerbeteiligung. Bei diesem Projekt werden Privatpersonen aufgefordert, Stechmücken zu fangen und zur wissenschaftlichen Weiterverwertung einzuschicken. Das Primärziel ist es, die Gewinnung von Daten zur Stechmückenfauna Deutschlands durch die Mitwirkung interessierter Menschen voranzutreiben. Die Medien haben das Thema intensiv aufgegriffen und zu einer breiten Beteiligung in der Bevölkerung geführt. Der Mückenatlas hat dabei nicht nur zu einer Zunahme des Interesses an dieser entomologischen Forschungsrichtung geführt, sondern auch zu neuen wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen verholfen. Die qualitative Absicherung der erhobenen Daten ist im Vergleich zu anderen Citizen Science Projekten sehr hoch, da die Artbestimmung der gefangenen Mücken durch die Wissenschaftler vorgenommen wird. Auf dieser Grundlage erfolgt eine Vernetzung zwischen den verantwortlichen Wissenschaftseinrichtungen (Leibniz-Zentrum für Agrarlandschaftsforschung (ZALF) und Friedrich- Loeffler-Institut (FLI), Bundesforschungsinstitut für Tiergesundheit) sowie der Aufbau von umfangreichen Referenzsammlungen, in die die eingeschickten Mücken eingehen. Der Erfolg des Projekts „Mückenatlas“ lässt sich auf mehrere Faktoren zurückführen. Grundlage für das Gelingen der Kommunikation zwischen den Akteuren des Citizen Science – Wissenschaftler, Bürger, Medien und Kommunikationsexperten – sind die Faktoren: Dialog auf Augenhöhe, Transparenz, Engagement und Relevanz. Zusammen ergeben sie das Wirkungsmodell für Citizen Science Kommunikation.
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    ABSTRACT: A wide range of arthropod-borne viruses threaten both human and animal health either through their presence in Europe or through risk of introduction. Prominent among these is West Nile virus (WNV), primarily an avian virus, which has caused multiple outbreaks associated with human and equine mortality. Endemic outbreaks of West Nile fever have been reported in Italy, Greece, France, Romania, Hungary, Russia and Spain, with further spread expected. Most outbreaks in Western Europe have been due to infection with WNV Lineage 1. In Eastern Europe WNV Lineage 2 has been responsible for human and bird mortality, particularly in Greece, which has experienced extensive outbreaks over three consecutive years. Italy has experienced co-circulation with both virus lineages. The ability to manage this threat in a cost-effective way is dependent on early detection. Targeted surveillance for pathogens within mosquito populations offers the ability to detect viruses prior to their emergence in livestock, equine species or human populations. In addition, it can establish a baseline of mosquito-borne virus activity and allow monitoring of change to this over time. Early detection offers the opportunity to raise disease awareness, initiate vector control and preventative vaccination, now available for horses, and encourage personal protection against mosquito bites. This would have major benefits through financial savings and reduction in equid morbidity/mortality. However, effective surveillance that predicts virus outbreaks is challenged by a range of factors including limited resources, variation in mosquito capture rates (too few or too many), difficulties in mosquito identification, often reliant on specialist entomologists, and the sensitive, rapid detection of viruses in mosquito pools. Surveillance for WNV and other arboviruses within mosquito populations varies between European countries in the extent and focus of the surveillance. This study reviews the current status of WNV in mosquito populations across Europe and how this is informing our understanding of virus epidemiology. Key findings such as detection of virus, presence of vector species and invasive mosquito species are summarized, and some of the difficulties encountered when applying a cost-effective surveillance programme are highlighted.
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 10/2013; 10(10):4869-95. DOI:10.3390/ijerph10104869 · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    Emerging Infectious Diseases 10/2013; 19(10):1701-3. DOI:10.3201/eid1910.130622 · 7.33 Impact Factor
  • Doreen Werner, Helge Kampen
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    ABSTRACT: After its first detection in 2008 in the south German federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg, another distinct population of the invasive Asian bush mosquito Aedes japonicus japonicus was unexpectedly found in western Germany in 2012. Range expansion had already been observed for the southern German population and was anticipated for the western German one. Here, we report on a third, apparently independent and even more northerly German colonization area of Aedes j. japonicus in southern Lower Saxony and northeastern North Rhine-Westphalia, which was discovered in spring 2013. In a snapshot study, intended to determine the presence or absence of Aedes j. japonicus in an area close to Hanover, the capital of the northern German federal state of Lower Saxony, where a specimen had been collected in late 2012, central water basins of cemeteries were checked for pre-imaginal mosquito stages at the beginning of the mosquito season 2013. Almost 20 % of the inspected cemeteries were found positive (25 out of 129), with many of them being located in towns and villages close to the motorways A2 and A7. Being of Far Eastern origin, the Asian bush mosquito is well adapted to moderate climates and appears to be further expanding its distribution area in Central Europe. As it is a proven laboratory vector of several mosquito-borne disease agents, its present and future distribution areas should be carefully monitored.
    Parasitology Research 08/2013; DOI:10.1007/s00436-013-3564-3 · 2.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Zusammenfassung: Im Sommer 2006 wurde die Artzusammensetzung der Stechmückenfauna (Diptera: Culicidae) entlang der Flussniederungen des Ryck und der Warnow in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Nordostdeutschland, nahe der Ostsee, untersucht. Pro Flussniederung wurden zehn Standorte von April bis September im Abstand von jeweils zwei Wochen beprobt. Adulte Stech-mücken wurden mit Keschern und Exhaustoren aus der Vegetation und von Säugern abgefangen, während Larven mit Sieben und Schöpfgefäßen aus ihrem Bruthabitat entnommen wurden. Die Individuen wurden morphologisch zur Art oder zum Artenkomplex bestimmt. Insgesamt gelang der Nachweis von 21 Arten aus den folgenden sechs Gattungen: Aedes, Anopheles, Coquillettidia, Culex, Culiseta und Ochlerotatus. Die drei Arten mit der höchsten Individuenanzahl waren Aedes vexans, Ochlerotatus caspius und Ochlerotatus sticticus, dicht gefolgt von Mitgliedern des Culex pipiens-Komplexes. Unter den 2494 gesammelten Individuen befanden sich 1648 Weibchen, 43 Männchen und 783 Larven. Viele Arten wurden nur als adulte Stechmücken gesammelt, während die am seltensten gefangene Spezies, Culex territans, nur durch zwei Larven repräsentiert war. Die in dieser Studie nachgewiesene Artzusammensetzung wurde mit den Ergebnissen der letzten vergleichbaren Untersuchung in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern verglichen, die mehr als zwei Jahr-zehnte vorher im Bezirk Schwerin durchgeführt worden war (soMMer 1983). Sammlungstechniken und-perioden waren in beiden Studien ähnlich. Während in der neueren Studie hauptsächlich typische Sommerarten mit hohen Individuenzahlen vertreten waren, gehörten die meisten gefan-genen Stechmücken aus Sommers Untersuchung zu den als Lästlingen bekannten Frühjahrsarten Ochlerotatus cantans, Ochlerotatus annulipes, Ochlerotatus punctor und Ochlerotatus cataphylla. Von diesen wurden in der vorliegenden Studie nur Oc. cantans (105 Individuen), Oc. cataphylla (74 Individuen) und Oc. annulipes (19 Individuen) gefangen. Von Plagen wurde allerdings nicht berichtet. Angesichts der vergleichbaren methodischen Ansätze in den beiden Studien müssen Diskrepanzen in der Spezieszusammensetzung vermutlich entweder unterschiedlichen Wetter-situationen oder unterschiedlichen Umweltbedingungen zugeschrieben werden. Um die weitere Entwicklung der Stechmückenfauna der untersuchten Regionen Mecklenburg-Vorpommerns zu verfolgen, sind weitere Sammlungen und Untersuchungen geplant.
    Entomologentagung, Göttingen; 03/2013

Publication Stats

707 Citations
117.40 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2015
    • Friedrich Loeffler Institute
      Griefswald, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany
  • 2014
    • MSD Animal Health, Germany
      Schleisheim, Bavaria, Germany
  • 2013
    • Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research
      Muencheberg, Brandenburg, Germany
  • 2008
    • Universitätsklinikum Münster
      Muenster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 1996–2008
    • University of Bonn
      • Institute of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology
      Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2007
    • University of Münster
      • Department of Dermatology - General Dermatology and Venereology
      Muenster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2005
    • Sigmund-Freud-Institut
      Frankfurt, Hesse, Germany