Y Kim

University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN, United States

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Publications (120)592.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Altered glucose transporter expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. There is increasing evidence that genetic factors convey risk of, or protection from, diabetic nephropathy and that the behaviour of cultured skin fibroblasts from type 1 diabetic patients may reflect these genetic influences. This study aimed to compare GLUT1 mRNA expression levels in skin fibroblasts from type 1 diabetic patients with either rapid ("fast-track", n=25) or slow ("slow-track", n=25) development of diabetic nephropathy and from non-diabetic normal control subjects (controls, n=25). Skin fibroblasts were cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium with 25 mmol/l glucose for 36 h. Total RNA was isolated, and GLUT1 mRNA levels were estimated by microarray analysis and RT-PCR. Levels of GLUT1 mRNA expression in skin fibroblasts from "slow-track" patients were greater than those from "fast-track" patients (p=0.02), as initially detected by microarray. GLUT1 mRNA expression levels were confirmed by RT-PCR to be higher in skin fibroblasts from "slow-track" patients (4.59+/-2.04) than in those from "fast-track" patients (3.34+/-1.2, p=0.02), and were also higher than in skin fibroblasts from control subjects (3.52+/-1.66, p=0.03). There was no statistically significant difference between levels of expression in the "fast-track" patients and the control subjects. This finding is consistent with the presence of cellular protection factors against diabetic nephropathy in the "slow-track" patients. These factors could be associated with the regulation of the GLUT1 pathway and may be genetically determined.
    Diabetologia 11/2004; 47(10):1789-94. · 6.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Progressive expansion of mesangial matrix and glomerular basement membrane thickening represent alterations in the balance between synthesis and degradation of glomerular extracellular matrix (ECM) protein and are hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy. In order to elucidate the basis for this imbalance between the synthesis and the degradation of ECM in renal tissues from patients of type 1 diabetes mellitus (type 1D) with diabetic nephropathy (DN), we examined the expression of alpha1 chain of type IV collagen (IV-C), matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -3 (MMP-2, MMP-3), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and beta-actin mRNA using a high-resolution in situ hybridization with digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide. Patients were divided into two groups based on both of degree of mesangial expansion using electron microscopic point counting morphometric methods and duration of type 1D: 7 'fast-track' patients were selected for their very rapid development of DN structural changes and 8 'slow-track' patients for their very slow development of DN structural changes. Seven normal human kidney (NHK) tissues were used as controls. Positive cells for each mRNA were observed in glomerular resident cells, including glomerular mesangial, epithelial and endothelial cells and cells of Bowman's capsule. The percentage of glomerular cells positive for IV-C, MMP-2 and MMP-3 mRNA was significantly greater in the 'slow-track' vs. 'fast-track' patients. No significant differences in percentage positive cells was seen for beta-actin mRNA. Furthermore, to elucidate the total number of positive cells per glomerulus for each mRNA, we estimated total cell number of glomerulus using morphometric techniques on light microscopy tissues. The total cell number per glomerulus was significantly greater in 'fast-track' than that in 'slow-track' patients and NHK. The total number of positive cells per glomerulus for MMP-2 in NHK was significantly greater than that in 'slow-track' and 'fast-track' patients. Thus, IV-C, MMP-2, MMP-3 and TIMP-1 mRNA are expressed in resident glomerular cells in renal tissues from NHK and type 1D. Glomerular alterations in these in situ mRNA expressions sufficient to explain ECM accumulation and DN risk were not uncovered. These largely negative results could be due to methodologic quantitative imprecision or could indicate that post-translational differences account for ECM imbalance in DN. However, these studies make it clear that unraveling the nature of the ECM production/removal imbalance in DN will require careful consideration of alterations in glomerular cell number.
    Nephron 02/2002; 92(3):564-72. · 13.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced nephrosis is a well-described model of human idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, but the mechanism of PAN's effect is not completely understood. Because PAN injection into rats results in retraction of glomerular epithelial cell foot processes and glomerular epithelial cell detachment, it was hypothesized that PAN might alter the contacts between these cells and the glomerular basement membrane. The major integrin expressed by glomerular epithelial cells is alpha3beta1, which mediates attachment of these cells to extracellular matrix proteins including type IV collagen. T-SV 40 immortalized human glomerular epithelial cells were used to study PAN's effects on alpha3beta1 expression, as well as that of podocalyxin and the slit diaphragm component ZO-1. Glomerular epithelial cells were seeded into plastic flasks and allowed to attach and proliferate for 48 h. The cells were then incubated for another 48 h in media containing 0, 0.5, or 5.0 microg/ml PAN. PAN exposure resulted in dose-dependent decreases in alpha3 and beta1 expression, both at the protein level and at the mRNA level. This was accompanied by a significant decrease in the adhesion of glomerular epithelial cells to type IV collagen. PAN did not affect ZO-1 protein expression. Treatment with PAN increased the expression of podocalyxin at the protein and mRNA levels. Reduced glomerular epithelial cell expression of alpha3beta1 integrins and impaired adhesion to type IV collagen may contribute to the glomerular epithelial cell detachment from glomerular basement membrane seen in the PAN nephrosis model.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 05/2001; 12(4):758-66. · 9.47 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Kidney Diseases 04/2001; 37(4). · 5.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Kidneys from mice, dogs, and humans with X-linked and autosomal-recessive forms of Alport syndrome were examined by immunofluorescence for expression of laminin alpha, beta, and gamma chains using monospecific antibodies. Laminin alpha2 chain was absent from glomerular basement membranes (GBM) in normal human, murine, and canine kidneys but was abnormally deposited in Alport GBM, regardless of species or inheritance pattern. In murine and canine Alport kidneys, laminin alpha2 seems to be deposited as part of both laminin-2 (alpha2beta1gamma1) and laminin-4 (alpha2beta2gamma1) but as part of only laminin-4 in human Alport kidneys. GBM laminin alpha2 chain deposition was not observed in a variety of non-Alport human glomerulopathies. This finding adds to the list of proteins that are aberrantly deposited in Alport GBM as a consequence of the absence of the alpha3, alpha4, and alpha5 chains of type IV collagen: (1) type IV collagen alpha1 and alpha2 chains, (2) type V collagen, (3) type VI collagen, and most recently (4) the laminin alpha2 chain and (5) the laminin alpha1 and beta1 chains in mice and dogs. These findings emphasize further the critical role played by the alpha3, alpha4, and alpha5 chains of type IV collagen in establishing and maintaining the composition, structure, and function of mature GBM.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 03/2001; 12(2):252-60. · 9.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The nature of the extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulating in the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and mesangium (Mes) in diabetes is unknown. Type IV collagen (Col IV) as estimated by quantitative immunoelectron microscopy was reduced in type I diabetic patients (D) with rapid ("fast-track") compared with slow ("slow-track") development of diabetic nephropathy (DN) lesions and controls (C). Col VI is another ECM component suggested to account for Mes matrix (MM) expansion in DN. Col VI ECM density was evaluated in eight "slow-track" {Mes fractional volume [Vv(Mes/glom)] <0.32, duration> 20 years} and seven "fast-track" patients [Vv(Mes/glom)> 0.37, duration <20 years diabetes] and in eight C. Quantitative immunoelectron microscopy was performed using polyclonal antibodies to Col VI. Gold particle density (PDG) in MM and the inner layer (IL) of the GBM was measured using stereologic methods. GBM IL PDG was decreased in both fast-track (1.7 +/- 1.6/microm2, mean +/- SD, P < 0.002) and slow-track (3.9 +/- 2.4, P < 0.02) D versus C (10.8 +/- 7.9). GBM IL PDG was also lower in the fast-track versus slow-track D (P < 0.04). Mes matrix PDG/microm2 was decreased in fast-track D (3.2 +/- 3.6) versus C (14.1 +/- 14.6, P < 0.02); a similar trend was seen in slow-track D (5.7 +/- 5.6, P < 0.1). There was no significant difference in MM PDG between the slow-track and fast-track D. Col VI density in MM and GBM is decreased in diabetic patients with slowly and rapidly developing renal lesions. This leaves the nature of ECM accumulation in DN unexplained. At least in part, glomerular ECM compositional change is related to diabetes per se and may be independent of the severity of lesions.
    Kidney International 02/2001; 59(1):317-23. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mucoid otitis media (MOM) is characterized by viscous fluid, high in mucin concentration, which accumulates in the middle ear cavity. Recent studies suggest that initial infection in the middle ear cleft may be key to the development of MOM. However, factors of the initial infection attributed to the stimulation of mucin production are not clearly understood. This study demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, a proinflammatory cytokine in mucoid effusion, markedly increased Muc2 mucin mRNA expression in middle ear epithelium, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Parallel to this was a marked increase in mucin glycoprotein in middle ear fluid. Also, TNF-alpha demonstrated an autocrine and/or paracrine effect on the expression of endogenous TNF-alpha gene in the middle ear, which may contribute to the production of mucin in this study. These findings suggest that TNF-alpha plays an important role in the development of MOM by stimulating mucin metabolism.
    The Journal of Infectious Diseases 10/2000; 182(3):882-7. · 5.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have employed immunohistochemistry to obtain baseline information on the molecular constituents of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the endolymphatic duct (ED) and endolymphatic sac (ES) of the chinchilla. The results demonstrated that collagen types I and III were distributed in the subepithelial layer in the ED and ES, type IV collagen and laminin in the basement membranes, and fibronectin in the subepithelial layer and partly in the conglomerated cells in the ES. Collagen type III was diffusely distributed in the whole subepithelial layer of the ES, whereas collagen type I was concentrated densely in the deep layer of the interstitium, although gradually, the cuboidal epithelium in the ES was transformed into a flatter type in the ED. The epithelial cells of the ED and ES were clearly positive for keratin. This study deals, in particular, with the normal distribution of ECM components of the ED and ES of the chinchilla.
    The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology 03/2000; 109(2):180-6. · 1.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate expression of the alpha6 chain of type IV collagen in the glomerular basement membranes (GBM) of healthy dogs. Kidney specimens from 12 healthy dogs. For comparison, kidney specimens from 8 human subjects between 25 and 83 years old also were evaluated. Sections were immunolabeled with a monospecific antibody that cross-reacts with human and canine alpha6(IV) chains and examined by means of fluorescence microscopy. Immunolabeling of the alpha6(IV) chain was not observed in GBM of 6 dogs < or = 30 months old but was observed in GBM of the remaining 6 dogs, all of which were > or = 45 months old. Expression of the alpha6(IV) chain was not observed in GBM of the human subjects, regardless of the age of the subject. Results indicate that the alpha6(IV) chain is expressed in GBM of healthy dogs, but the expression is age-dependent. Composition and structural organization of type IV collagen in the GBM of healthy adult dogs is different from that described for other species.
    American Journal of Veterinary Research 02/2000; 61(1):38-41. · 1.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The distribution of collagen types I, III, and IV and of laminin, fibronectin, and keratin was studied in otitis media experimentally induced by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla. The expression of interstitial collagen types I and III and of fibronectin was increased in the subepithelial space that was thickened by inflammation in the acute period of infection. The expression of collagen type IV in the subepithelial space could be seen in the early period. The epithelial cells in the middle ear changed from flat cuboidal to pseudostratified columnar in pneumococcus-inoculated ears, and the number of keratin-positive epithelial cells in the middle ear increased remarkably after infection. These results indicate that changes in epithelial cell differentiation effected by the extracellular matrix correlate with changes in expression of keratin. It is proposed that the extracellular matrix may contribute to tissue repair in the middle ear after bacterial infection by interfering with cell proliferation of epithelial cells and fibroblasts.
    The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology 09/1999; 108(8):769-76. · 1.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) is a family of transcription factors that is recognized by the kappa B enhancer element. Numerous proinflammatory genes have binding sites for NF-kappa B, and the products of these genes are an integral part of cellular activation and inflammatory response systems. Because there is a close relationship between NF-kappa B and mediators of cell activation, it is possible that a disruption of NF-kappa B-activating pathways may effectively influence mesangial cell activation. We reviewed available studies related to both NF-kappa B and mesangial cells in order to provide evidence for the role of NF-kappa B in mesangial cell activation. Studies reported by this laboratory and others showed that various experimental maneuvers that modulate NF-kappa B activation result in a parallel modulation of proinflammatory molecule production in cultured mesangial cells. Likewise, the ability of the inhibitors of NF-kappa B activation to down-regulate the inflammatory response in animal models of renal disease has been recently demonstrated. These data suggest a pivotal role of NF-kappa B in mesangial cell activation and designate it as an obvious target for the modulation of this activation. Studies are necessary to characterize the role of NF-kappa B in human renal injury.
    Kidney international. Supplement 08/1999; 71:S76-9.
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    ABSTRACT: To determine features of a new form of hereditary nephritis (HN) in dogs. Parents and 16 first-generation offspring (8 males, 8 females). Adolescent dogs that developed renal failure were euthanatized and necropsied. Unaffected dogs were monitored until they were at least 2 years old. Studies included light and electron microscopy of kidneys obtained from affected and unaffected dogs and immunolabeling for collagen-IV chains in renal and epidermal basement membranes (BM). The nucleotide sequence of a portion of exon 35 of the COL4A5 gene was determined in genomic DNA isolated from affected and unaffected males. 7 of 8 male and 2 of 8 female offspring had proteinuria and juvenile-onset chronic renal failure, which progressed more rapidly in the males. Labeling for alpha3-alpha6(IV) chains was completely absent in renal BM of affected males and segmentally absent in affected females. Expression of alpha1-alpha2(IV) chains in glomerular BM (GBM) of affected dogs was increased. Labeling for alpha5-alpha6(IV) chains in epidermal BM was absent in affected males and segmental in affected females. Ultrastructural changes characteristic of HN were observed in GBM of affected dogs. The sequence of exon 35 of COL4A5 was normal in affected dogs. This renal disease is an example of X-linked dominant HN, with typical abnormalities of GBM ultrastructure and alpha(IV) chain expression. CLINICAL RELEVANCE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR HUMAN MEDICINE: Dogs with this naturally acquired progressive renal disease can be used to investigate the pathogenesis and treatment of similar disorders in human beings and dogs.
    American Journal of Veterinary Research 04/1999; 60(3):373-83. · 1.21 Impact Factor
  • Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension 10/1998; 7(5):489-94. · 4.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Type IV collagen (COL-IV) interacts with a variety of cell types. We present evidence that human mesangial cells (HMC) bind directly to COL-IV, its major triple helical domain, and the main non-collagenous, NC1 domain. A synthetic peptide, HEP-III, and its triple helical counterpart (THP-III), previously reported to be a heparin-binding domain, also promoted approximately 15% adhesion of HMC. HMC bound to solid-phase-immobilized, intact COL-IV (approximately 75%), isolated NC1 domain (approximately 15%), and a pepsin-derived triple helical fragment,which lacks Hep-III (approximately 65%). We further examined inhibition of HMC adhesion to COL-IV and its domains by using anti-integrin antibodies. Blocking monoclonal antibodies against the alpha2 integrin resulted in 70% inhibition of adhesion to COL-IV and 80% inhibition to HEP-III. Moderate inhibition was observed on the NC1 and triple helical fragments. Anti-alpha1 antibodies inhibited the binding of HMC to COL-IV, the NC1, and triple helical domains, but not to peptide HEP-III. Anti-beta1 antibodies inhibited almost completely (>95%) the adhesion to COL-IV, the NC1, and triple helical fragments; inhibition on HEP-III was approximately 30%. Affinity chromatography studies with solid-phase HEP-III and mesangial cell lysate also demonstrated the presence of integrin alpha2 beta1 along with alpha3 beta1. We conclude that alpha2 beta1 and alpha1 beta1 integrins mediate HMC adhesion to COL-IV. Peptide HEP-III is a major, specific site for alpha2 integrin-mediated binding of mesangial cells to COL-IV. Both the alpha1 beta1 and alpha2 beta1 integrins interact with the NC1 and triple helical fragments of COL-IV. Therefore, we demonstrate that several sites for integrin-mediated interactions exist on several collagenous and non-collagenous domains of COL-IV.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 05/1998; 273(20):12244-9. · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Entactin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein which binds to laminin and is found in most renal basement membranes and in the glomerular mesangial matrix. In the present study, we have characterized specific integrin receptors on cultured human mesangial cells (CHMC) responsible for adhesion to native entactin. The integrin receptors alpha 2 beta 1, alpha 3 beta 1, alpha 5 beta 1, alpha v beta 3, alpha v beta 5, and alpha 6 complexed with either beta 1 or beta 4 could be immune precipitated from detergent extracts of metabolically labeled CHMC. Adhesion assays with inhibitory anti integrin monoclonal antibodies (mab) demonstrated that CHMC use both alpha v beta 3 and a beta 1-containing integrin to bind surfaces coated with native entactin. Optimal binding of CHMC to native entactin required the participation of cations. Using wild type and mutant recombinant entactin fragments, the binding site for the alpha v beta 3 receptor was localized to the RGD sequence on the rod or E domain of entactin. CHMC adhesion to mutant full length recombinant entactin ligands lacking the E domain RGD sequence confirmed the presence of ligand binding site(s) for beta 1 integrin receptor(s). Differences in CHMC binding characteristics to recombinant and full length entactin compared to native bovine basement membrane entactin were observed. This suggests that tertiary molecular structure may contribute to entactin ligand binding properties. Primary amino acid residue sequences and tertiary structure of entactin may play roles in forming functional cell attachment sites in native basement membrane entactin.
    Cell adhesion and communication 04/1998; 5(3):237-48.
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    ABSTRACT: Entactin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein which binds to laminin and is found in most renal basement membranes and in the glomerular mesangial matrix. In the present study, we have characterized specific integrin receptors on cultured human mesangial cells (CHMC) responsible for adhesion to native entactin. The integrin receptors alpha 2 beta 1, alpha 3 beta 1, alpha 5 beta 1, alpha v beta 3, alpha v beta 5, and alpha 6 complexed with either beta 1 or beta 4 could be immune precipitated from detergent extracts of metabolically labeled CHMC. Adhesion assays with inhibitory anti integrin monoclonal antibodies (mab) demonstrated that CHMC use both alpha v beta 3 and a beta 1-containing integrin to bind surfaces coated with native entactin. Optimal binding of CHMC to native entactin required the participation of cations. Using wild type and mutant recombinant entactin fragments, the binding site for the alpha v beta 3 receptor was localized to the RGD sequence on the rod or E domain of entactin. CHMC adhesion to mutant full length recombinant entactin ligands lacking the E domain RGD sequence confirmed the presence of ligand binding site(s) for beta 1 integrin receptor(s). Differences in CHMC binding characteristics to recombinant and full length entactin compared to native bovine basement membrane entactin were observed. This suggests that tertiary molecular structure may contribute to entactin ligand binding properties. Primary amino acid residue sequences and tertiary structure of entactin may play roles in forming functional cell attachment sites in native basement membrane entactin.
    Cell adhesion and communication 04/1998; 5(3):237-48.
  • J Lin, Y Kim, S K Juhn
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), originally defined by its antitumoral activity, is now recognized as a polypeptide mediator of inflammatory and cellular immune response. Recent studies have demonstrated that TNF-(alpha exists in the fluid of otitis media with effusion and, therefore, suggested its possible role in the pathogenesis of mucus hypersecretion. In this study, the effects of TNF-alpha on mucous glycoprotein (MGP) secretion from cultured chinchilla middle ear epithelial cells were examined, and TNF-alpha was found to stimulate MGP secretion in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The action of TNF-alpha on MGP secretion was significantly and dose-dependently inhibited by TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody; this finding is suggestive of its specificity on MGP secretion. The addition of the protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperidine (H-7) to the culture significantly blocked TNF-alpha-induced MGP secretion, while the calmodulin inhibitor N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) did not. This suggests that TNF-alpha stimulates MGP secretion via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism.
    The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology 04/1998; 107(3):213-9. · 1.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although glomerular structure has been studied, careful evaluation of tubular basement membrane (TBM) structure in diabetes in humans has not been done. We measured proximal TBM width, glomerular basement membrane (GBM) width, mesangial fractional volume [Vv(Mes/glom)], mesangial matrix fractional volume [Vv(MM/glom)], and cortical interstitial fractional volume [Vv(Int/cortex)] in 35 insulin-dependent diabetic (IDDM) patients and 20 controls. The patients' mean age was 28 +/- 10 years (X +/- SD) and IDDM duration was 17 +/- 8 years. Twenty-five patients were normoalbuminuric, four microalbuminuric, and six had overt proteinuria. Tubular basement membrane and GBM widths were measured by the orthogonal intercept method and mesangial and interstitial parameters by point counting. The TBM width was 915 +/- 320 nm in IDDM patients and 558 +/- 116 nm in controls (P = 0.0005); the TBM width was also increased in normoalbuminuric patients (849 +/- 297 nm, P = 0.0005). The TBM width was strongly directly related to GBM width (r = 0.67, P < 0.001), Vv(Mes/glom) (r = 0.52, P < 0.01), and Vv(MM/glom) (r = 0.61, P < 0.001), but only weakly to Vv(Int/cortex) (r = 0.29, NS). The TBM width (r = 0.65, P < 0.001) and GBM width (r = 0.65, P < 0.001) were strongly related to hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), while the Vv(Mes/glom) (r = 0.35, P < 0.05) and Vv(Int/cortex) (r = 0.30, NS) were only weakly related to HbA1C. Thus, increased proximal TBM width is an integral component of early nephropathology in IDDM patients. This study suggests that the metabolic disturbances of diabetes are strong determinants of the constellation of structural abnormalities occurring in human diabetic nephropathy.
    Kidney International 03/1998; 53(3):754-61. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Tubulointerstitial nephritis antigen (TIN-ag) is a 58 kDa glycoprotein restricted within the kidney to basement membranes underlying the epithelium of Bowman's capsule and proximal and distal tubules. Autoantibody formation against this component has been described in association with primary immune-mediated tubulointerstital nephritis, membranous nephropathy and anti-glomerular basement membrane nephritis. In the present report, the ontogeny of this protein was studied in human fetal kidney tissue by immunohistochemical analysis of immature and developing nephrons using a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. TIN-ag is first detected in basement membranes underlying the epithelium of Bowman's capsule of early capillary loop stage glomeruli and the primitive proximal tubule. No detectable expression is observed in the basement membranes of the branching ureteric bud, nephrogenic vesicle, or comma shape and s-shape stages of nephrogenic development. Increased staining of the proximal tubular basement membrane is associated with outgrowth of the primitive tubule from the urinary pole of the developing glomerulus. In more mature fetal tubules, TIN-ag expression closely resembles that of previously reported observations in mature tissue where it is present in high amounts in the basement membranes of proximal tubules, and to a lesser extent in Bowman's capsule and distal tubules. Our results suggest that TIN-ag expression is developmentally regulated in a precise spatial and temporal pattern throughout nephrogenesis.
    Connective Tissue Research 02/1998; 37(1-2):53-60. · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies have shown that cultured skin fibroblasts (SFs) from insulin-dependent diabetic mellitus (IDDM) patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) exhibit both increased proliferation and Na+/H+ antiporter activity. The present study correlated the growth rate and mRNA expression of integrin subunits, extracellular matrix molecules, and transforming growth factor-beta in cultured SFs, with the biopsy determined rate of development of DN lesions ranging from slow to rapid in nine IDDM patients. These varying rates of development of DN lesions were expressed by a mesangial expansion score as estimated by the rate of change in mesangial fraction volume per year. Cultured SF proliferation by direct cell counts positively correlated with mesangial expansion score (r = 0.65; P < 0.05). Expression of cultured SF alpha3 integrin subunit mRNA levels, as well as type I collagen mRNA (P < 0.05 for both), but not transforming growth factor-beta mRNA levels (Northern blot analysis), were also positively correlated with mesangial expansion score. We postulate that these observations of correlations between activities of cultured SFs and the rate of progression of DN lesions may be predictive of the risk to develop clinical DN in IDDM, may be in part genetically regulated, and may be of pathogenetic importance.
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases 02/1998; 31(2):293-300. · 5.76 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
592.81 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1988–2004
    • University of Minnesota Twin Cities
      • • Department of Pediatrics
      • • Department of Otolaryngology
      • • Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology
      Minneapolis, MN, United States
  • 1995–2002
    • Tokai University
      • School of Medicine
      Hiratsuka, Kanagawa-ken, Japan
    • University of California, Santa Barbara
      Santa Barbara, California, United States
  • 2001
    • Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 1999–2000
    • Texas A&M University
      College Station, Texas, United States
  • 1998
    • University-Hospital of Padova
      Padua, Veneto, Italy
  • 1983–1998
    • University of Minnesota Duluth
      • Medical School
      Duluth, Minnesota, United States
  • 1997
    • Samsung Medical Center
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1993–1997
    • Hennepin County Medical Center
      Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
  • 1989
    • Leiden University
      Leyden, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 1987
    • Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota
      Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States