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Publications (3)2.08 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been increasingly acknowledged as a valid and appropriate indicator of public health and chronic morbidity. However, limited research was conducted among Chinese civil servants owing to the different lifestyle. The aim of the study was to evaluate the HRQoL among Chinese civil servants and to identify factors might be associated with their HRQoL. A cross-sectional study was conducted to investigate HRQoL of 15,000 civil servants in China using stratified random sampling methods. Independent-Samples t-Test, one-way ANOVA, and multiple stepwise regression were used to analyse the influencing factors and the HRQoL of the civil servants. A univariate analysis showed that there were significant differences among physical component summary (PCS), mental component summary (MCS), and TS between lifestyle factors, such as smoking, drinking alcohol, having breakfast, sleep time, physical exercise, work time, operating computers, and sedentariness (P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regressions showed that there were significant differences among TS between lifestyle factors, such as breakfast, sleep time, physical exercise, operating computers, sedentariness, work time, and drinking (P < 0.05). In this study, using Short Form 36 items (SF-36), we assessed the association of HRQoL with lifestyle factors, including smoking, drinking alcohol, having breakfast, sleep time, physical exercise, work time, operating computers, and sedentariness in China. The performance of the questionnaire in the large-scale survey is satisfactory and provides a large picture of the HRQoL status in Chinese civil servants. Our results indicate that lifestyle factors such as smoking, drinking alcohol, having breakfast, sleep time, physical exercise, work time, operating computers, and sedentariness affect the HRQoL of civil servants in China.
    BMC Public Health 05/2012; 12:330. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To establish the norms of Sub-Health Measurement Scale Version1.0 (SHMS V1.0) for Chinese civil servants. We sampled a total of 15 000 civil servants form Tianjin (north China), Guangdong (south China), Anhui and Hunan (central China), Xinjiang (northwest China) and Shenyang (northeast China) to perform the spot trial, and established the mean, percentile and threshold norms based on the characteristics of SHMS V1.0 scores for Chinese civil servants. The established norms based on the average scores of SHMS V1.0 showed a mean score of 66.55∓12.36 for young male subjects (below 40 years), 67.42∓12.40 for older male subjects, 66.22∓11.81 for female subjects younger than 40 years, and 65.94∓11.91 for older female subjects. The threshold norms of SHMS V1.0 divided 5 health states, namely disease, severe sub-health, moderate sub-health, mild sub-health and healthy states according to the Mean∓SD and Mean∓0.5SD of the converted scores. The 4 cut-off points were close to the 15th, 30th, 70th and 85th percentile scores of SHMS V1.0. We have established SHMS V1.0 norms for Chinese civil servants, which facilitates further investigation of the incidence of sub-health state and its contributing factors in civil servants.
    Nan fang yi ke da xue xue bao = Journal of Southern Medical University 10/2011; 31(10):1654-62.
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the reliability and validity of the Sub-health Measurement Scale Version 1.0 (SHMS V1.0). A spot trial sampling of 2000 individuals was conducted to study the test-retest reliability, Cronbach alpha coefficient, split-half reliability, contract validity, content validity and criterion-related validity of SHMS V1.0. The spot trial results indicated a test-retest reliability of SHMS V1.0 of 0.644 (P<0.001) with a Cronbach α coefficient of 0.917 and a split-half reliability of 0.831. The results showed a close correlation between each item of SHMS V1.0 and its dimension, but a low correlation between a particular item and other dimensions. The dimension score was significantly correlated to its subscale scores, but not to other subscale scores. The results of factor analysis matched the theoretical conception of SHMS V1.0. The correlation coefficient between SHMS V1.0 and SF-36 was 0.664 (P<0.001). SHMS V1.0 has a good reliability and validity, and is a reliable and valid measurement scale for sub-health evaluation.
    Nan fang yi ke da xue xue bao = Journal of Southern Medical University 01/2011; 31(1):33-8.