Takeshi Yamada

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, United States

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Publications (8)78.94 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2) is a basic protein with ill-defined function that inhibits the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. Herein, we show that treatment of K562 cells with 5-azacytidine (5-Aza) resulted in a 24-fold increase in G0S2 expression and a reduction in cell growth. Conversely, gene demethylation in the presence of G0S2-specific shRNA restored proliferation, further supporting an inhibitory role for G0S2 in cell proliferation. Elevated levels of G0S2 inhibited the division of K562 cells by sequestering the nucleolar phosphoprotein nucleolin in the cytosol. G0S2 inhibited the proliferation of leukemia cells in vivo in xenograft models. Collectively, our data identify a new mechanism that controls proliferation in K562 cells, suggesting a possible tumor suppressor function in leukemia cells.
    Leukemia research 10/2013; · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cellular quiescence is a reversible cell cycle arrest that is poised to re-enter the cell cycle in response to a combination of cell-intrinsic factors and environmental cues. In hematopoietic stem cells, a coordinated balance between quiescence and differentiating proliferation ensures longevity and prevents both genetic damage and stem cell exhaustion. However, little is known about how all these processes are integrated at the molecular level. We will briefly review the environmental and intrinsic control of stem cell quiescence and discuss a new model that involves a protein-to-protein interaction between G0S2 and the phospho-nucleoprotein nucleolin in the cytosol.
    Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.) 06/2013; 12(15). · 5.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The development and survival of NK cells rely on a complex, spatiotemporal gene expression pattern regulated by specific transcription factors in NK cells and tissue-specific microenvironments supported by hematopoietic cells. Here, we show that somatic deletion of the KLF4 gene, using inducible and lineage-specific cre-transgenic mice, leads to a significant reduction of NK cells (NK1.1(+) TCR-β(-)) in the blood and spleen but not in the BM, liver, or LNs. Functional and immunophenotypic analyses revealed increased apoptosis of CD27(+/-) CD11b(+) NK cells in the spleen of KLF4-deficient mice, although remaining NK cells were able to lyse tumor target cells and produce IFN-γ. A normal recovery of adoptively transferred KLF4-deficient NK cells in WT hosts suggested that the survival defect was not intrinsic of NK cells. However, BM chimeras using KLF4-deficient mice as donors indicated that reduced survival of NK cells depended on BM-derived hematopoietic cells in the spleen. The number of CD11c(hi) DCs, which are known to support NK cell survival, was reduced significantly in the spleen of KLF4-deficient mice, likely a result of a lower number of precDC progenitor cells in this tissue. Taken together, our data suggest that the pluripotency-associated gene KLF4 is required for the maintenance of DCs in the spleen and consequently, survival of differentiated NK cells in this tissue.
    Journal of leukocyte biology 02/2012; 91(5):739-50. · 4.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) balance proliferation and differentiation by integrating complex transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms regulated by cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors. We found that transcripts of G(0)/G(1) switch gene 2 (G0S2) are enriched in lineage(-) Sca-1(+) c-kit(+) (LSK) CD150(+) CD48(-) CD41(-) cells, a population highly enriched for quiescent HSCs, whereas G0S2 expression is suppressed in dividing LSK CD150(+) CD48(-) cells. Gain-of-function analyses using retroviral expression vectors in bone marrow cells showed that G0S2 localizes to the mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and early endosomes in hematopoietic cells. Co-transplantation of bone marrow cells transduced with the control or G0S2 retrovirus led to increased chimerism of G0S2-overexpressing cells in femurs, although their contribution to the blood was reduced. This finding was correlated with increased quiescence in G0S2-overexpressing HSCs (LSK CD150(+) CD48(-)) and progenitor cells (LS(-)K). Conversely, silencing of endogenous G0S2 expression in bone marrow cells increased blood chimerism upon transplantation and promoted HSC cell division, supporting an inhibitory role for G0S2 in HSC proliferation. A proteomic study revealed that the hydrophobic domain of G0S2 interacts with a domain of nucleolin that is rich in arginine-glycine-glycine repeats, which results in the retention of nucleolin in the cytosol. We showed that this cytosolic retention of nucleolin occurs in resting, but not proliferating, wild-type LSK CD150(+) CD48(-) cells. Collectively, we propose a novel model of HSC quiescence in which elevated G0S2 expression can sequester nucleolin in the cytosol, precluding its pro-proliferation functions in the nucleolus.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(5):e38280. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The regeneration of the hematopoietic system in bone marrow after chemotherapy depends on a balance between the quiescence and proliferation of lineage-specific progenitor cells. Even though the vascular network in bone is damaged by cytoablation, the transcriptional control of quiescence in endothelial cells is not well known. In this study, we investigated the role of the transcription factor E74-like factor (ELF4) in the proliferation of endothelial cells in bone marrow. Loss-of-function models were used to study the role of ELF4 in human and murine endothelial cells. ELF4 promotes cell cycle entry by activating cyclin-dependent kinase-4 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Elf4-null mice exhibited enhanced recovery of bone marrow CD45- CD31+ endothelial cells and sinusoidal blood vessels following administration of 5-fluorouracil. Loss of ELF4 leads to increased quiescence in bone marrow endothelial cells by the deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase-4 expression and to enhanced regeneration of sinusoidal blood vessels.
    Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 02/2011; 31(5):1185-91. · 6.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: T cell receptor activation inhibits expression of the E74-like factor (ELF) 4 and Krüppel-like factor 4 genes to release naive CD8(+) T cells from their quiescent state. In this study, we show that ELF4 controls the ERK-mediated proliferative response by maintaining normal levels of dual-specificity phosphatases 1 and 5 in CD8(+) T cells. In activated CD8(+) T cells, the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway inhibits ELF4 and Krüppel-like factor 4 expression downstream of ERK and PI3K signaling. Our findings demonstrate that rapamycin could be used to modulate expression of this transcriptional network involved in cell-cycle regulation.
    The Journal of Immunology 10/2010; 185(7):3824-8. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Transcription factors that regulate the quiescence, proliferation and homing of lymphocytes are critical for effective immune system function. Here we demonstrate that the transcription factor ELF4 directly activated the tumor suppressor KLF4 'downstream' of T cell antigen receptor signaling to induce cell cycle arrest in naive CD8(+) T cells. Elf4- and Klf4-deficient mice accumulated CD8(+)CD44(hi) T cells during steady-state conditions and generated more memory T cells after immunization. The homeostatic population expansion of CD8(+)CD44(hi) T cells in Elf4-null mice resulted in a redistribution of cells to nonlymphoid tissue because of lower expression of the transcription factor KLF2 and the surface proteins CCR7 and CD62L. Our work describes the combinatorial effect of lymphocyte-intrinsic factors on the homeostasis, activation and homing of T cells.
    Nature Immunology 07/2009; 10(6):618-26. · 26.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The transcriptional circuitry that regulates the quiescence of hematopoietic stem cells is largely unknown. We report that the transcription factor known as MEF (or ELF4), which is targeted by the t(X;21)(q26;q22) in acute myelogenous leukemia, regulates the proliferation of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells at steady state, controlling their quiescence. Mef null HSCs display increased residence in G0 with reduced 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in vivo and impaired cytokine-driven proliferation in vitro. Due to their increased HSC quiescence, Mef null mice are relatively resistant to the myelosuppressive effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, MEF plays an important role in the decision of stem/primitive progenitor cells to divide or remain quiescent by regulating their entry to the cell cycle.
    Cancer Cell 04/2006; 9(3):175-87. · 24.76 Impact Factor