Takayoshi Ohkubo

Teikyo University, Edo, Tōkyō, Japan

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Publications (444)2301.02 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to investigate physicians' awareness and use of the Japanese Society of Hypertension (JSH) Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension (JSH2004 and JSH2009), and determine what changes need to be implemented in the future. A questionnaire was used to survey physicians' awareness and their use of JSH2004 and JSH2009. Physicians attending educational seminars on hypertension that were held during the months after the publication of JSH2009 (January-April 2009) were asked to participate in the survey. Of the 5795 respondents, 88% were aware of the JSH2009 publication. Furthermore, physicians were also aware of JSH2004, with about 90% using JSH2004 in their practice. A hypertension blood pressure (BP) reference value of 140/90 mm Hg was used by 55% in office BP, whereas 31% used 135/85 mm Hg for home BP. Target BP levels used by physicians were 130/80 mm Hg for patients with diabetes or kidney disease (52%) and for elderly patients with diabetes or kidney disease (45%), whereas 140/90 mm Hg was used for elderly patients with low cardiovascular disease risk (44%) and for patients with chronic-phase stroke (27%). Answers to the questionnaire varied among physicians according to sex, age, workplace and specialty. The majority of the participating Japanese physicians were familiar with both JSH2004 and JSH2009, with many following the guidelines in their practice. However, some physicians use different reference values for hypertension and target BP levels. Physicians' adherence to and use of the guidelines should be regularly examined and promoted.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 2 April 2015; doi:10.1038/hr.2015.21.
    Hypertension Research 04/2015; DOI:10.1038/hr.2015.21 · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In addition to day-to-day variability in blood pressure (BP) or heart rate (HR), N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) has been reported to be a predictor of cardiovascular disease. Here, we tested the hypothesis that day-to-day BP or HR variability calculated as the intraindividual standard deviation (SD) of home BP or HR is associated with elevated NT-proBNP in a cross-sectional study. Among 664 participants (mean age, 61.9 years; female, 70.5%) from a general Japanese population without a history of heart disease, 86 (13.0%) had NT-proBNP at least 125 pg/ml. Each 1 SD increase in the SD of home systolic BP (SBP) [odds ratio (OR), 1.82; P < .0001) and in the SD of home HR (OR, 1.44; P = 0.008) were significantly associated with the prevalence of NT-proBNP at least 125 pg/ml after adjustment for possible confounding factors including home SBP and HR. Among the four groups defined by the median SD of home SBP and of home HR, the group with higher SDs in home SBP (≥8.0 mmHg) and HR (≥5.0 bpm) had the greatest OR for the prevalence of NT-proBNP at least 125 pg/ml (OR, 4.80; P = 0007 vs. a reference group with lower SDs of home SBP and HR). These results suggest that day-to-day variability in BP and HR may be associated with target-organ damage or complications, which can lead to an elevated NT-proBNP level. An elevated NT-proBNP level may be involved in the prognostic significance of day-to-day variability in BP or HR.
    Journal of Hypertension 03/2015; DOI:10.1097/HJH.0000000000000570 · 4.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The association of high-density lipoprotein particle (HDL-P) with atherosclerosis may be stronger than that of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Whether associations persist in populations at low risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) remains unclear. This study examines the associations of HDL-P and HDL-C with carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and plaque counts among Japanese men, who characteristically have higher HDL-C levels and a lower CHD burden than those in men of Western populations. We cross-sectionally examined a community-based sample of 870 Japanese men aged 40-79 years, free of known clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) and not on lipid-lowering medication. Participants were randomly selected among Japanese living in Kusatsu City in Shiga, Japan. Both HDL-P and HDL-C were inversely and independently associated with cIMT in models adjusted for conventional CHD risk factors, including low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and diabetes. HDL-P maintained an association with cIMT after further adjustment for HDL-C (P < 0.01), whereas the association of HDL-C with cIMT was noticeably absent after inclusion of HDL-P in the model. In plaque counts of the carotid arteries, HDL-P was significantly associated with a reduction in plaque count, whereas HDL-C was not. HDL-P, in comparison to HDL-C, is more strongly associated with measures of carotid atherosclerosis in a cross-sectional study of Japanese men. Findings demonstrate that, HDL-P is a strong correlate of subclinical atherosclerosis even in a population at low risk for CHD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Atherosclerosis 01/2015; 239(2):444-450. DOI:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.01.031 · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: No large-scale, longitudinal studies have examined the combined effects of blood pressure (BP) and total cholesterol levels on long-term risks for subtypes of cardiovascular death in an Asian population. To investigate these relationships, a meta-analysis of individual participant data, which included 73 916 Japanese subjects (age, 57.7 years; men, 41.1%) from 11 cohorts, was conducted. During a mean follow-up of 15.0 years, deaths from coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and intraparenchymal hemorrhage occurred in 770, 724, and 345 cases, respectively. Cohort-stratified Cox proportional hazard models were used. After stratifying the participants by 4 systolic BP ×4 total cholesterol categories, the group with systolic BP ≥160 mm Hg with total cholesterol ≥5.7 mmol/L had the greatest risk for coronary heart disease death (adjusted hazard ratio, 4.39; P<0.0001 versus group with systolic BP <120 mm Hg and total cholesterol <4.7 mmol/L). The adjusted hazard ratios of systolic BP (per 20 mm Hg) increased with increases in total cholesterol categories (hazard ratio, 1.52; P<0.0001 in group with total cholesterol ≥5.7 mmol/L). Similarly, the adjusted hazard ratios of total cholesterol increased with increases in systolic BP categories (P for interaction ≤0.04). Systolic BP was positively associated with ischemic stroke and intraparenchymal hemorrhage death, and total cholesterol was inversely associated with intraparenchymal hemorrhage, but no significant interactions between BP and total cholesterol were observed for stroke. High BP and high total cholesterol can synergistically increase the risk for coronary heart disease death but not for stroke in the Asian population. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
    Hypertension 01/2015; 65(3). DOI:10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.114.04639 · 7.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background/Objectives:There have been few studies on the association of fruit and vegetable (FV) intake with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in Asian populations where both dietary habits and disease structure are different from western countries. No study in Asia has found its significant association with stroke. We examined associations of FV intake with mortality risk from total CVD, stroke and coronary heart diseases (CHDs) in a representative Japanese sample.Methods:A total of 9112 participants aged from 24-year follow-up data in the NIPPON DATA80, of which baseline data were obtained in the National Nutrition Survey Japan in 1980, were studied. Dietary data were obtained from 3-day weighing dietary records. Participants were divided into sex-specific quartiles of energy adjusted intake of FV. Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated between strata of the total of FV intake, fruit intake and vegetable intake. The adjustment included age, sex, smoking, drinking habit and energy adjusted intakes of sodium and some other food groups.Results:Participants with higher FV intake were older, ate more fish, milk and dairy products and soybeans and legumes and ate less meat. Multivariate-adjusted HR (95% confidence interval; P; P for trend) for the highest versus the lowest quartile of the total of FV intake was 0.74 (0.61-0.91; 0.004; 0.003) for total CVD, 0.80 (0.59-1.09; 0.105; 0.036) for stroke and 0.57 (0.37-0.87; 0.010; 0.109) for CHD.Conclusions:The results showed that higher total intake of FVs was significantly associated with reduced risk of CVD mortality in Japan.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 14 January 2015; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2014.276.
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    ABSTRACT: Rapid increases in life expectancy have led to concurrent increases in the number of elderly people living alone or those forced to change living situations. Previous studies have found that poor dietary intake was common in elderly people living alone. However, there have been few studies about the dietary intake in elderly people living in other situations, particularly those living with family other than a spouse (nonspouse family), which is common in Japan. To examine the differences in dietary intake by different living situations in elderly Japanese people. We analyzed the data of 1542 healthy residents in the town of Ohasama aged 60 years and over who had completed self-administered questionnaires. The dietary intake was measured using a validated 141-item food frequency questionnaire. Multiple regression models with robust (White-corrected) standard errors were individually fitted for nutrients and foods by living situation. In men, although the presence of other family was correlated with significantly lower intake of protein-related foods, e.g., legumes, fish and shellfish, and dairy products, these declines were more serious in men living with nonspouse family. Conversely, in men living alone the intake of fruits and vegetables was significantly lower. In women, lower intakes of fruit and protein-related foods were significantly more common in participants living with nonspouse family than those living with only a spouse. These findings revealed that elderly people living alone as well as those living with family other than a spouse had poor dietary intake, suggesting that strategies to improve food choices and skills for food preparation could promote of healthy eating in elderly Japanese people.
    The Journal of Nutrition Health and Aging 01/2015; 19(4). DOI:10.1007/s12603-015-0456-5 · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: On March 11, 2011, the Great East Japan Earthquake hit northeast Japan. Previous letter on Hypertension by Sato et al reported that 11.6/3.9mmHg for systolic/diastolic blood pressure (BP) and 4.7bpm for heart rate (HR) elevations were observed by home BP measurement among hypertensive outpatients aged 68.1±8.8 years. In this study we observed home BP change before and after the earthquake among pregnant women. We used database from the BOSHI study which participated pregnant women from October 2006 to September 2011 at a maternity hospital In Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. The participants were asked to measure their own BPs every morning at home while they were pregnant. A linear mixed model was used for analysis of the BP course throughout pregnancy. Total 1137 pregnant woman was included into the analysis. Of those, 210 pregnant women were participated before the earthquake and gave birth after the earthquake. Of those, 133 women measured their BP in March 2011. The average number of home BP measurements was 13.8 in March 2011. Home BP and HR which are not measured in March 2011 were 105.9(105.4-106.4)/63.2(62.8-63.6)mmHg and 74.3(73.9-74.7)bpm, respectively. Home BP and HR were 105.0(103.5-106.4)/64.1(62.8-65.3)mmHg, 73.8(71.8-81.8)bpm in the morning at March 11, 2011 (just before the earthquake), and 110.7(104.8-116.6)/63.6(58.4-68.8)mmHg, 76.3(70.2-82.5)bpm in the morning at March 12, 2011 (just after the earthquake), respectively. Home BP was immediately elevated just after the earthquake and gradually decreased over a month as we previously reported among hypertensive patients. Because we only analyzed BP who could keep their equipment, the BP change just after the earthquake might be underestimated. H. Metoki: Research Support Recipient; Commercial Interest: Omron Healthcare. N. Iwama: None. Z. Watanabe: None. T. Ohkubo: None. M. Ishikuro: None. T. Obara: None. M. Kikuya: None. J. Sugawara: None. S. Kuriyama: None. K. Itoh: None. K. Hoshi: None. M. Suzuki: None. M. Satoh: None. N. Yaegashi: None. Y. Imai: None. Copyright © 2014.
    01/2015; 5(1):4-5. DOI:10.1016/j.preghy.2014.10.012
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    ABSTRACT: Background Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries between 1990, and 2013. We used the results to assess whether there is epidemiological convergence across countries. Methods We estimated age-sex-specific all-cause mortality using the GBD 2010 methods with some refinements to improve accuracy applied to an updated database of vital registration, survey, and census data. We generally estimated cause of death as in the GBD 2010. Key improvements included the addition of more recent vital registration data for 72 countries, an updated verbal autopsy literature review, two new and detailed data systems for China, and more detail for Mexico, UK, Turkey, and Russia. We improved statistical models for garbage code redistribution. We used six different modelling strategies across the 240 causes; cause of death ensemble modelling (CODEm) was the dominant strategy for causes with sufficient information. Trends for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias were informed by meta-regression of prevalence studies. For pathogen-specific causes of diarrhoea and lower respiratory infections we used a counterfactual approach. We computed two measures of convergence (inequality) across countries: the average relative difference across all pairs of countries (Gini coefficient) and the average absolute difference across countries. To summarise broad findings, we used multiple decrement life-tables to decompose probabilities of death from birth to exact age 15 years, from exact age 15 years to exact age 50 years, and from exact age 50 years to exact age 75 years, and life expectancy at birth into major causes. For all quantities reported, we computed 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs). We constrained cause-specific fractions within each age-sex-country-year group to sum to all-cause mortality based on draws from the uncertainty distributions. Findings Global life expectancy for both sexes increased from 65·3 years (UI 65·0–65·6) in 1990, to 71·5 years (UI 71·0–71·9) in 2013, while the number of deaths increased from 47·5 million (UI 46·8–48·2) to 54·9 million (UI 53·6–56·3) over the same interval. Global progress masked variation by age and sex: for children, average absolute differences between countries decreased but relative differences increased. For women aged 25–39 years and older than 75 years and for men aged 20–49 years and 65 years and older, both absolute and relative differences increased. Decomposition of global and regional life expectancy showed the prominent role of reductions in age-standardised death rates for cardiovascular diseases and cancers in high-income regions, and reductions in child deaths from diarrhoea, lower respiratory infections, and neonatal causes in low-income regions. HIV/AIDS reduced life expectancy in southern sub-Saharan Africa. For most communicable causes of death both numbers of deaths and age-standardised death rates fell whereas for most non-communicable causes, demographic shifts have increased numbers of deaths but decreased age-standardised death rates. Global deaths from injury increased by 10·7%, from 4·3 million deaths in 1990 to 4·8 million in 2013; but age-standardised rates declined over the same period by 21%. For some causes of more than 100 000 deaths per year in 2013, age-standardised death rates increased between 1990 and 2013, including HIV/AIDS, pancreatic cancer, atrial fibrillation and flutter, drug use disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus for lower respiratory infections. Country-specific probabilities of death over three phases of life were substantially varied between and within regions. Interpretation For most countries, the general pattern of reductions in age-sex specific mortality has been associated with a progressive shift towards a larger share of the remaining deaths caused by non-communicable disease and injuries. Assessing epidemiological convergence across countries depends on whether an absolute or relative measure of inequality is used. Nevertheless, age-standardised death rates for seven substantial causes are increasing, suggesting the potential for reversals in some countries. Important gaps exist in the empirical data for cause of death estimates for some countries; for example, no national data for India are available for the past decade.
    The Lancet 12/2014; 385(9963):117-171. · 39.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Up-to-date evidence on levels and trends for age-sex-specific all-cause and cause-specific mortality is essential for the formation of global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) we estimated yearly deaths for 188 countries between 1990, and 2013. We used the results to assess whether there is epidemiological convergence across countries. Methods We estimated age-sex-specific all-cause mortality using the GBD 2010 methods with some refinements to improve accuracy applied to an updated database of vital registration, survey, and census data. We generally estimated cause of death as in the GBD 2010. Key improvements included the addition of more recent vital registration data for 72 countries, an updated verbal autopsy literature review, two new and detailed data systems for China, and more detail for Mexico, UK, Turkey, and Russia. We improved statistical models for garbage code redistribution. We used six different modelling strategies across the 240 causes; cause of death ensemble modelling (CODEm) was the dominant strategy for causes with sufficient information. Trends for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias were informed by meta-regression of prevalence studies. For pathogen-specific causes of diarrhoea and lower respiratory infections we used a counterfactual approach. We computed two measures of convergence (inequality) across countries: the average relative difference across all pairs of countries (Gini coefficient) and the average absolute difference across countries. To summarise broad findings, we used multiple decrement life-tables to decompose probabilities of death from birth to exact age 15 years, from exact age 15 years to exact age 50 years, and from exact age 50 years to exact age 75 years, and life expectancy at birth into major causes. For all quantities reported, we computed 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs). We constrained cause-specific fractions within each age-sex-country-year group to sum to all-cause mortality based on draws from the uncertainty distributions. Findings Global life expectancy for both sexes increased from 65·3 years (UI 65·0–65·6) in 1990, to 71·5 years (UI 71·0–71·9) in 2013, while the number of deaths increased from 47·5 million (UI 46·8–48·2) to 54·9 million (UI 53·6–56·3) over the same interval. Global progress masked variation by age and sex: for children, average absolute differences between countries decreased but relative differences increased. For women aged 25–39 years and older than 75 years and for men aged 20–49 years and 65 years and older, both absolute and relative differences increased. Decomposition of global and regional life expectancy showed the prominent role of reductions in age-standardised death rates for cardiovascular diseases and cancers in high-income regions, and reductions in child deaths from diarrhoea, lower respiratory infections, and neonatal causes in low-income regions. HIV/AIDS reduced life expectancy in southern sub-Saharan Africa. For most communicable causes of death both numbers of deaths and age-standardised death rates fell whereas for most non-communicable causes, demographic shifts have increased numbers of deaths but decreased age-standardised death rates. Global deaths from injury increased by 10·7%, from 4·3 million deaths in 1990 to 4·8 million in 2013; but age-standardised rates declined over the same period by 21%. For some causes of more than 100 000 deaths per year in 2013, age-standardised death rates increased between 1990 and 2013, including HIV/AIDS, pancreatic cancer, atrial fibrillation and flutter, drug use disorders, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and sickle-cell anaemias. Diarrhoeal diseases, lower respiratory infections, neonatal causes, and malaria are still in the top five causes of death in children younger than 5 years. The most important pathogens are rotavirus for diarrhoea and pneumococcus for lower respiratory infections. Country-specific probabilities of death over three phases of life were substantially varied between and within regions. Interpretation For most countries, the general pattern of reductions in age-sex specific mortality has been associated with a progressive shift towards a larger share of the remaining deaths caused by non-communicable disease and injuries. Assessing epidemiological convergence across countries depends on whether an absolute or relative measure of inequality is used. Nevertheless, age-standardised death rates for seven substantial causes are increasing, suggesting the potential for reversals in some countries. Important gaps exist in the empirical data for cause of death estimates for some countries; for example, no national data for India are available for the past decade.
    The Lancet 12/2014; 385(9963):117-171. DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)61682-2 · 39.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: To examine whether the inflammatory markers C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen are associated with biomarkers of atherosclerosis [carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and coronary artery calcification (CAC)] in the general male population, including Asians.Methods: Population-based samples of 310 Japanese, 293 Japanese-American and 297 white men 40-49 years of age without clinical cardiovascular disease underwent measurement of IMT, CAC and the CRP and fibrinogen levels as well as other conventional risk factors using standardized methods. Statistical associations between the variables were evaluated using multiple linear or logistic regression models.Results: The Japanese group had significantly lower levels of inflammatory markers and subclinical atherosclerosis than the Japanese-American and white groups (P-values all <0.001). The mean level of CRP was 0.66 vs. 1.11 and 1.47 mg/L, while that of fibrinogen was 255.0 vs. 313.0 and 291.5 mg/dl, respectively. In addition, the mean carotid IMT was 0.61 vs. 0.73 and 0.68 mm, while the mean prevalence of CAC was 11.6% vs. 32.1% and 26.3%, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) showed significant positive associations with both the CRP and fibrinogen levels. Although CRP showed a significant positive association with IMT in the Japanese men, this association became non-significant following adjustment for traditional risk factors or BMI. In all three populations, CRP was not found to be significantly associated with the prevalence of CAC. Similarly, fibrinogen did not exhibit a significant association with either IMT or the prevalence of CAC.Conclusions: The associations between inflammatory markers and subclinical atherosclerosis may merely reflect the strong associations between BMI and the levels of inflammatory markers and incidence of subclinical atherosclerosis in both Eastern and Western populations.
    Journal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis 11/2014; DOI:10.5551/jat.23580 · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Current guidelines make no outcome-based recommendations on the optimal measurement schedule for home blood pressure (BP).
    American Journal of Hypertension 11/2014; DOI:10.1093/ajh/hpu216 · 3.40 Impact Factor
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  • Journal of Hypertension 10/2014; 32(10):2099-100. DOI:10.1097/HJH.0000000000000334 · 4.22 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) may be a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than clinic brachial (B)SBP. The effects of dose increment from medium dose of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) to the maximum dose of ARBs (maximum) and changing from medium dose of ARBs to losartan 50 mg/hydrochlorothiazide 12.5 mg combination (combination) were compared in hypertensive patients in whom monotherapy with a medium ARB dose did not achieve goal home SBP (135 mmHg). Four weeks after treatment with a medium ARB dose monotherapy, those whose home SBP level was above 135 mmHg were randomized to receive the maximum ARB dose (n = 101) or the combination (n = 99) once daily for 8 weeks. Both regimens significantly decreased BSBP and CSBP, while a decrease in BSBP and CSBP was greater with combination. The maximum significantly decreased augmentation index (AIx), while the combination did not. The rate of a decrease in reflection to decrease in CSBP was greater in the maximum than in the combination. In the elderly subgroup, the combination more effectively lowered BSBP than the maximum, and only the combination decreased CSBP. However, in the young subgroup, the maximum decreased AIx more than combination, while both regimens lowered CSBP and BSBP to a similar extent. It is explained in part that the maximum may affect pulse wave reflection more predominantly than the combination, especially in young subjects. A weak effect on pulse wave reflection and, thus, on CSBP, of the combination may be overcome by the potent antihypertensive effect of this regimen.
    Clinical and Experimental Hypertension 10/2014; DOI:10.3109/10641963.2014.960972 · 1.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The utility of lipoprotein particle profiles measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy beyond standard serum lipids remains inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have compared NMR measurements with standard lipids in association with coronary artery calcification (CAC) in Japanese, where the coronary atherosclerotic burden is low. We examined whether NMR-based lipoprotein particle profiles are associated with CAC, and compared them with standard lipid and lipid ratios in the Japanese general population. Methods and Results We conducted a cross-sectional study in 851 men aged 40–79 years without cardiovascular diseases and lipid-lowering therapies. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence intervals) for the top versus the bottom quartile of NMR-measured particle concentrations were 2.01 (1.24–3.23) for low-density lipoprotein (LDL-P), 1.04 (0.62–1.75) for high-density lipoprotein (HDL-P), 1.82 (1.13–2.95) for very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-P), and 1.92 (1.18–3.17) for LDL-P/HDL-P ratio. Similarly adjusted ORs of NMR-measured particle sizes were 0.59 (0.36–0.97) for LDL-P, 0.66 (0.40–1.10) for HDL-P, and 0.67 (0.40–1.12) for VLDL-P. The corresponding ORs were 1.82 (1.14–2.90) for total cholesterol (TC), 2.06 (1.28–3.30) for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), 0.56 (0.34–0.91) for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), 2.02 (1.24–3.29) for triglycerides, 2.08 (1.29–3.36) for non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), 2.27 (1.37–3.78) for TC/HDL-C ratio, and 1.73 (1.06–2.85) for LDL-C/HDL-C ratio. After mutual adjustment for total LDL-P concentration and TC/HDL-C ratio or non-HDL-C, LDL-P was no longer associated, whereas TC/HDL-C ratio remained significantly associated with CAC. Conclusions In community-based Japanese men, the overall association of CAC with NMR-measured lipoprotein indices is comparable, but not superior, to that with standard lipids.
    Atherosclerosis 10/2014; 236(2):237–243. DOI:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2014.07.019 · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) has been recognized as an important indicator for the overall glycemic state preceding the onset of metabolic diseases. Most genome-wide association loci for FPG so far been identified were derived from populations with European ancestry with a few exceptions. To extend a thorough catalog for FPG loci, we conducted meta-analyses of 13 genome-wide association studies in up to 24,740 non-diabetic subjects with East Asian ancestry. Follow-up replication analyses in up to additional 21,345 participants identified three new FPG loci reaching genome-wide significance in or near PDK1-RAPGEF4, KANK1 and IGF1R. Our results could provide additional insight into the genetic variation implicated in fasting glucose regulation.
    Diabetes 09/2014; DOI:10.2337/db14-0563 · 8.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: The population-attributable fraction (PAF) is an indicator of the disease burden. In Western countries, the PAF of hypercholesterolemia in cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the highest among that for traditional risk factors; however, data for Asian populations are limited. Methods: A 24-year cohort study was conducted among 9,209 randomly selected patients who were not taking statins. We estimated the hazard ratio (HR) after adjusting for covariates and PAF associated with the serum total cholesterol (TC) levels in relation to CVD mortality. Results: The TC level was found to be positively associated with an increased risk of CVD, coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiac death (CHD plus heart failure), with an HR of 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-1.16), 1.33 (95% CI: 1.14-1.55) and 1.21 (95% CI: 1.08-1.35) for a 1-SD increment in the serum TC level, respectively. Similar positive associations between the TC level and both CHD and cardiac death were observed after classifying the patients by age and sex. Furthermore, the highest serum TC level (≥6.72 mmol/L) was positively associated with CVD death, with an HR of 1.76 (95% CI: 1.25-2.47), as well as both CHD death and cardiac death. In contrast, no significant relationships were observed between the serum TC level and stroke. Meanwhile, the PAF for CVD, CHD, and cardiac deaths due to hypercholesterolemia (serum TC level ≥5.69 mmol/L, defined by the Japan Atherosclerosis Society) was 1.7%, 10.6% and 5.6%, respectively. Conclusions: The estimated PAF of CVD death due to hypercholesterolemia is moderately high, but lower than that for other risk factors, such as hypertension.
    Journal of atherosclerosis and thrombosis 09/2014; 22(1). DOI:10.5551/jat.25908 · 2.77 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

10k Citations
2,301.02 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013–2015
    • Teikyo University
      • Department of Hygiene and Public Health
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • Teikyo University Hospital
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2006–2015
    • Shiga University of Medical Science
      • Department of Health Science
      Ōtu, Shiga Prefecture, Japan
  • 2014
    • University of Queensland
      • School of Population Health
      Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    • University of Shizuoka
      • Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Genetics
      Sizuoka, Shizuoka, Japan
  • 1999–2014
    • Tohoku University
      • • Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences
      • • Department of Life and Pharmaceutical Science
      • • Department of Medical Genetics
      Japan
  • 2012
    • Shiga University
      Japan
    • Brighton and Sussex Medical School
      Brighton, England, United Kingdom
  • 2010
    • National Institute of Health and Nutrition
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • Ruijin Hospital North
      Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China
  • 2009
    • Universidad de Montevideo
      Ciudad de Montevideo, Montevideo, Uruguay
    • Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre
      Hvidovre, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 2008
    • Maastricht University
      • Department of Epidemiology
      Maastricht, Provincie Limburg, Netherlands
  • 2007–2008
    • Uppsala University
      • Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences
      Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden
    • Yonsei University
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Shanghai Jiao Tong University
      • Institute of Hypertension
      Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China
  • 2005
    • University Hospital Medical Information Network
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2001
    • Miyazaki University
      • Department of Nursing
      Миядзаки, Miyazaki, Japan
  • 2000
    • Osaka University
      Suika, Ōsaka, Japan