Tomoko Oeda

Fukuoka University, Hukuoka, Fukuoka, Japan

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Publications (37)111.52 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Transient myoclonic state with asterixis (TMA) is characterized by sudden onset generalized myoclonus and asterixis without consciousness impairment. Electrophysiological studies have revealed that myoclonus correlates with cortical hyperexcitability localized in the primary motor cortex during the symptomatic period. However, it is unclear whether this excitability remains in the asymptomatic period. Here, we report a 79-year-old Japanese man who presented with TMA. He had been diagnosed with progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA) and he suffered from rhythmic myoclonus; predominantly in the neck, shoulders and upper extremities. Asterixis was observed in the forearms. Brain 123I-iodoamphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography showed focal hyperperfusion in the bilateral precentral gyri even at 3 months after remission of the myoclonus. These data suggest that cortical hyperactivity was persistent without symptoms and led to TMA, which could have been due to the underlying neurodegenerative disorder of PNFA.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience. 11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: In Parkinson disease (PD), systemic inflammation caused by respiratory infections such as pneumonia frequently occurs, often resulting in delirium in the advanced stages of this disease. Delirium can lead to cognitive and functional decline, institutionalization, and mortality, especially in the elderly. Inflammation causes rapid worsening of PD motor symptoms and signs, sometimes irreversibly in some, but not all, patients.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(6):e94944. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Though infections are associated with psychotic symptoms, whether or not subclinical inflammation is associated with hallucinations is not known in Parkinson's disease (PD). To investigate the association of illusions/hallucinations and plasma CRP levels in PD patients without symptomatic infections. PD patients not diagnosed as having infections were assessed for illusions and hallucinations using the Parkinson Psychosis Questionnaire (PPQ). It comprises four-domain questions: PPQ-A for sleep problems, PPQ-B for hallucinations/illusions, PPQ-C for delusions, and PPQ-D for disorientation. Assigning patients with ≥1 points in the PPQ-B score to be cases and others as controls, the association of hallucinations/illusions and clinical features (age, sex, duration of PD, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part 3 (UPDRS-3), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score, sleep disturbance (PPQ-A score) as well as daily doses of L-Dopa, dopamine agonists, amantadine, and selegiline) were analyzed using a case-control design. A total of 111 patients were examined and plasma CRP levels were <0.1-6.0 mg/L. Hallucinations or illusions were detected in 28 (25.2%). There were significant differences in age, UPDRS-3 score, MMSE score, PPQ-A, daily doses of L-Dopa and dopamine agonists and plasma CRP levels between cases and controls. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that UPDRS-3 scores and plasma CRP levels were significantly associated with hallucinations/illusions with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.96 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-3.20) per 10 points and 1.57 (95% confidence interval 1.13-2.16) per two-fold, respectively. Dividing patients into thirds by CRP levels (≤0.2, 0.3-0.6, ≥0.7 mg/L), the prevalence of hallucinations/illusions was 13.2%, 21.6%, and 41.7%, in the bottom-, middle-, and top-thirds, respectively (for trend p = 0.012). Subclinical elevation of plasma CRP levels was associated with hallucinations or illusions after adjustment for motor disability, suggesting that subclinical elevations of CRP levels might be an independent risk for hallucinations/illusions.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(1):e85886. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abnormal posture (AP) is often seen in Parkinson's disease (PD), and marked forms known as dropped head syndrome and camptocormia encumber daily living activities. Unlike other motor disabilities such as bradykinesia or muscular rigidity, AP is not always improved but rather deteriorated by PD medication. To clarify factors associated with neck and thoracolumbar AP. Neck flexion (NF) and thoracolumbar (TL) angles were measured in 216 consecutive PD patients and 175 elderly healthy controls. The differences in NF and TL angles between PD patients and controls were designated as ΔNFA and ΔTLA, respectively. The association of ΔNFA or ΔTLA and predictable factors such as age, sex, duration of PD, Hoehn Yahr (H-Y) stage, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part 3 (UPDRS-3), daily dose of dopamine agonists, and comorbid orthopedic spinal lesions was investigated in PD patients. Patients were divided into quartiles according to ΔNFA or ΔTLA. The association between predictable factors and ΔNFA or ΔTLA was estimated as odds ratio (OR), comparing with the lowest quartile as the reference by multivariate regression analysis. Compared with controls, distributions of all three posture angles were significantly shifted rightward in PD patients. Although there were no difference in UPDRS-3 scores in the quartiles of ΔNFA, the highest quartile was associated with H-Y stage ≥3 [OR 2.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.33-6.70, p = 0.008] after adjustment for age, sex and comorbid orthopedic spinal lesions. The highest quartile of ΔTLA was associated with comorbid orthopedic spinal lesions [OR 5.83 (1.42-23.8), p = 0.014], and UPDRS-3 score [OR 3.04 (1.80-5.15)/10 points, p<0.0001]. Thoraco-lumbar AP was associated with UPDRS-3 scores and orthopedic spinal lesions, and in contrast, neck AP was not associated with these factors, suggesting that they had different pathomechanisms.
    PLoS ONE 12/2013; 8(9):e73547. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Psychoses such as hallucinations are a frequent non-motor problem in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and serious psychosis requires anti-psychotic medications that worsen Parkinsonism. Although psychosis could be associated with patient-related or biological factors such as cognition, age, and severity of PD, it can also be associated with medications.Therefore we aimed to investigate patient-related and medication-related risks of psychosis requiring anti-psychotic medications (serious psychosis). A retrospective cohort of 331 PD patients was followed for 2 years. Patient-related factors associated with risk of psychosis were identified by a survival time analysis. In patients who developed psychosis, medications during the hazard period (1-14 days before psychosis) were contrasted with those during the control periods (1 and 3 months before psychosis) using a case--crossover analysis to identify medication-related risks of psychosis. Serious psychosis was detected in 52 patients and the incidence was estimated to be 116 (95% confidence interval [CI], 85-148) per 1,000 person-years. Analyses of baseline characteristics revealed the risk to be higher in patients with a modified Hoehn--Yahr stage of >=4 (hazard ratio [HR], 2.22; 95% CI, 1.11-4.40), those with a longer duration of PD (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.00-1.55, per 5 years) and those with Mini-Mental State Examination scores of <=24 (HR, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.37-5.16). The case-crossover analysis revealed that anti-cholinergics use (HR, 19.7; 95% CI, 2.39-162) elevated the risk, while donepezil use reduced it (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.27-0.85). Risk of psychosis was elevated by increasing severity of PD, cognitive dysfunction and duration of the disease. It was elevated by use of anti-cholinergic drugs and reduced by use of donepezil. The medication-related risk was higher in patients aged >= 70 years. In contrast, there was no significant medication-related risk in younger patients, suggesting different pathomechanisms between young and old patients.
    BMC Neurology 10/2013; 13(1):145. · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is often hard to differentiate Parkinson's disease (PD) and parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P), especially in the early stages. Cardiac sympathetic denervation and putaminal rarefaction are specific findings for PD and MSA-P, respectively. We investigated diagnostic accuracy of putaminal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) test for MSA-P and (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigram for PD, especially in early-stage patients. The referral standard diagnosis of PD and MSA-P were the diagnostic criteria of the United Kingdom Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank Criteria and the second consensus criteria, respectively. Based on the referral standard criteria, diagnostic accuracy [area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity] of the ADC and MIBG tests was estimated retrospectively. Diagnostic accuracy of these tests performed within 3 years of symptom onset was also investigated. ADC and MIBG tests were performed on 138 patients (20 MSA and 118 PD). AUC was 0.95 and 0.83 for the ADC and MIBG tests, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were 85.0% and 89.0% for MSA-P diagnosis by ADC test and 67.0% and 80.0% for PD diagnosis by MIBG test. When these tests were restricted to patients with disease duration ≤3 years, the sensitivity and specificity were 75.0% and 91.4% for the ADC test (MSA-P diagnosis) and 47.7% and 92.3% for the MIBG test (PD diagnosis). Both tests were useful in differentiating between PD and MSA-P, even in the early stages. In early-stage patients, elevated putaminal ADC was a diagnostic marker for MSA-P. Despite high specificity of the MIBG test, careful neurological history and examinations were required for PD diagnosis because of possible false-negative results.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(4):e61066. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    Hideyuki Sawada, Tomoko Oeda
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    ABSTRACT: Psychosis, including hallucinations and delusions, is one of the important non-motor problems in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and is possibly associated with cholinergic neuronal degeneration. The EDAP (Efficacy of Donepezil against Psychosis in PD) study will evaluate the efficacy of donepezil, a brain acetylcholine esterase inhibitor, for prevention of psychosis in PD. Psychosis is assessed every 4 weeks using the Parkinson Psychosis Questionnaire (PPQ) and patients with PD whose PPQ-B score (hallucinations) and PPQ-C score (delusions) have been zero for 8 weeks before enrolment are randomised to two arms: patients receiving donepezil hydrochloride or patients receiving placebo. The patients are then followed for 96 weeks. The primary outcome measure is the time to the event, defined as getting 2 points or more on the PPQ-B score or PPQ-C score, which is assessed using a survival time analysis. The hypothesis being tested is that donepezil prevents psychosis in patients with PD. Efficacy will be tested statistically using the intention-to-treat analysis including a log-rank test or Cox proportional hazard models. Secondary outcomes, such as changes of PPQ scores and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores from baseline will be assessed. Ethics approval was received from the Central Review Board of the National Hospital Organization, Tokyo, Japan. The trial was declared and registered to the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency(PMDA), Japan (No. 22-4018). All participants will receive a written informed consent that was approved by the Central Review. A completed written informed consent is required to enrol in the study. Severe adverse events will be monitored by investigators and in cases where a severe adverse event was previously unreported, it will be reported to the PMDA. UMIN000005403.
    BMJ Open 01/2013; 3(9):e003533. · 2.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several genome-wide association studies and case-control studies have investigated the relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the BST1 gene and Parkinson's disease (PD), but the results have been inconsistent. We examined the relationships between SNPs rs11931532, rs12645693, and rs11724635 and the risk of sporadic PD in Japan. Included were 229 cases within 6years of onset of PD as defined according to the UK PD Society Brain Bank clinical diagnostic criteria. Controls were 357 inpatients and outpatients without neurodegenerative disease. SNPs rs11931532 and rs12645693 were not significantly related to sporadic PD. Compared with a reference group of subjects with the CC genotype of SNP rs11724635, those with the AA genotype had a marginally significantly increased risk of sporadic PD: the adjusted OR was 1.57 (95% CI: 0.95-2.61, P=0.08). No significant interactions were found between BST1 SNP rs11724635 and smoking or caffeine intake with respect to sporadic PD. The current study failed to detect significant relationships between BST1 SNPs rs11931532, rs12645693, and rs11724635 and sporadic PD; however, the relationship between SNP rs11724635 and sporadic PD was of borderline significance. We do not find evidence for interactions between smoking or caffeine intake and SNP rs11724635 affecting sporadic PD.
    Journal of the neurological sciences 09/2012; · 2.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has been suggested that P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the product of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) gene, regulates the brain entry of various xenobiotics. Impaired function of P-gp may be associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a MDR1 C3435T polymorphism on PD risk alone or in combination with environmental factors. A total of 238 patients with PD and 368 controls were genotyped for the MDR1 C3435T polymorphism. Subjects with the TT genotype of the C3435T polymorphism showed a nonsignificantly increased risk of PD (odds ratio (OR) = 1.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) =0.85 - 2.25) compared with those with the CC genotype. A gene-environment interaction was suggested, with a combination of at least one T allele and ever drinking conferring significantly higher risk (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.07 - 3.15, P = 0.029), compared with the CC genotype and never drinking. No significant interaction of smoking or occupational pesticide use with the C3435T polymorphism was observed. Our results suggest that the C3435T polymorphism may not play an important role in PD susceptibility in Japanese. Evidence of an interaction between the C3435T polymorphism and alcohol consumption was suggested.
    Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics 09/2012; · 2.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A recent meta-analysis on the UCHL1 S18Y variant and Parkinson's disease (PD) showed a significant inverse association between the Y allele and PD; the individual studies included in that meta-analysis, however, have produced conflicting results. We examined the relationship between UCHL1 S18Y single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and sporadic PD in Japan. METHODS: Included were 229 cases within 6 years of onset of PD, defined according to the UK PD Society Brain Bank clinical diagnostic criteria. Controls were 357 inpatients and outpatients without neurodegenerative disease. Adjustment was made for sex, age, region of residence, smoking, and caffeine intake. RESULTS: Compared with subjects with the CC or CA genotype of UCHL1 S18Y SNP, those with the AA genotype had a significantly increased risk of sporadic PD: the adjusted OR was 1.57 (95% CI: 1.06 to 2.31). Compared with subjects with the CC or CA genotype of UCHL1 S18Y and the CC or CT genotype of SNCA SNP rs356220, those with the AA genotype of UCHL1 S18Y and the TT genotype of SNP rs356220 had a significantly increased risk of sporadic PD; the interaction, however, was not significant. Our previous investigation found significant inverse relationships between smoking and caffeine intake and PD in this population. There were no significant interactions between UCHL1 S18Y and smoking or caffeine intake affecting sporadic PD. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that the UCHL1 S18Y variant is a risk factor for sporadic PD. We could not find evidence for interactions affecting sporadic PD between UCHL1 S18Y and SNCA SNP rs356220, smoking, or caffeine intake.
    BMC Neurology 07/2012; 12(1):62. · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several case-control studies and genome-wide association studies have examined the relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the SNCA gene and Parkinson's disease (PD), and have provided inconsistent results. We investigated the relationships between SNPs rs356229, rs356219, rs356220, rs7684318, and rs2736990 and the risk of sporadic PD in Japan using data from a multicenter hospital-based case-control study. Included were 229 cases within 6 years of onset of PD as defined according to the UK PD Society Brain Bank clinical diagnostic criteria. Controls were 357 inpatients and outpatients without neurodegenerative disease. Adjustment was made for sex, age, region of residence, and smoking. Based on the recessive model, compared with subjects with the CC or CT genotype of SNP rs356220, those with the TT genotype had a significantly increased risk of sporadic PD: the adjusted OR was 1.42 (95% CI: 1.002-2.02). In the additive model, SNP rs2736990 was significantly related to the risk of sporadic PD: the adjusted OR was 1.30 (95% CI: 1.002-1.68). There were no significant relationships between SNP rs356229, rs356219, or rs7684318 and the risk of sporadic PD in any genetic model. The additive interactions between SNPs rs356219 and rs356220 and smoking with respect to sporadic PD were significant although the multiplicative interactions were not significant. This study suggests that SNCA SNPs rs356220 and rs2736990 are significantly associated with the risk of sporadic PD in Japanese. We also present new evidence for biological interactions between SNPs rs356219 and rs356220 and smoking that affect sporadic PD.
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders 03/2012; 18(5):557-61. · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nearly all epidemiologic studies examining the association between the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) and diet have focused on single foods and specific nutrients. However, epidemiologic evidence for the association of dietary pattern with PD, namely the measurement of overall diet by considering the cumulative effects of nutrients is extremely limited. We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Japan to examine the relationship between dietary patterns and the risk of PD. Patients with PD diagnosed using the UK PD Society Brain Bank criteria (n = 249) and controls without neurodegenerative diseases (n = 368) were recruited. At the time of recruitment, dietary intake during the preceding 1 month was assessed using a validated, self-administered diet history questionnaire. Dietary patterns from 33 predefined food groups (energy-adjusted food g/day) were extracted by factor analysis. Three dietary patterns were identified: 'Healthy', 'Western' and 'Light meal' patterns. After adjustment for potential non-dietary confounding factors, the Healthy pattern, characterized by a high intake of vegetables, seaweed, pulses, mushrooms, fruits and fish, was inversely associated with the risk of PD with a border-line significance (P for trend = 0.06). Multivariate Odds ratio (95% confidence intervals) for PD in the highest quartile of the Healthy pattern was 0.54 (0.32-0.92) compared with the lowest quartile. No associations with PD were detected for the other two dietary patterns. In this case-control study in Japan, a dietary pattern consisting of high intakes of vegetables, fruits and fish may be associated with a decreased risk of PD.
    European Journal of Neurology 12/2011; 19(5):681-8. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Genetic polymorphisms involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission may influence susceptibility to PD. We investigated the relationship of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), monoamine oxidase B (MAOB), dopamine receptor (DR) D2 and DRD4 polymorphisms and PD risk with special attention to the interaction with cigarette smoking among 238 patients with PD and 369 controls in a Japanese population. Subjects with the AA genotype of MAOB rs1799836 showed a significantly increased risk of PD (odds ratio (OR) = 1.70, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.12 - 2.58) compared with the AG and GG genotypes combined. The AA genotype of COMT rs4680 was marginally associated with an increased risk of PD (OR = 1.86, 95% CI = 0.98 - 3.50) compared with the GG genotype. The DRD2 rs1800497 and DRD4 rs1800955 polymorphisms showed no association with PD. A COMT -smoking interaction was suggested, with the combined GA and AA genotypes of rs4680 and non-smoking conferring significantly higher risk (OR = 3.97, 95% CI = 2.13 - 7.41) than the AA genotype and a history of smoking (P for interaction = 0.061). No interactions of smoking with other polymorphisms were observed. The COMT rs4680 and MAOB rs1799836 polymorphisms may increase susceptibility to PD risk among Japanese. Future studies involving larger control and case populations and better pesticide exposure histories will undoubtedly lead to a more thorough understanding of the role of the polymorphisms involved in the dopamine pathway in PD.
    BMC Neurology 07/2011; 11:89. · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Metals are involved in several important functions in the nervous system. Zinc and iron are increased and copper is decreased in the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, epidemiological evidence for the association of dietary intake of metals with the risk of PD is limited. We investigated the relationship between metal consumption and the risk of PD in Japan using data from a multicenter hospital-based case-control study. Included were 249 cases within 6 years of onset of PD based on the UK PD Society Brain Bank clinical diagnostic criteria. Controls were 368 inpatients and outpatients without a neurodegenerative disease. Information on dietary factors was collected using a self-administered diet history questionnaire. Higher intake of iron, magnesium, and zinc was independently associated with a reduced risk of PD: the adjusted OR in the highest quartile was 0.24 (95% CI: 0.10-0.57, P for trend=0.0003) for iron, 0.33 (95% CI: 0.13-0.81, P for trend=0.007) for magnesium and 0.50 (95% CI: 0.26-0.95, P for trend=0.055) for zinc. There were no relationships between the intake of copper or manganese and the risk of PD. Higher intake of iron, magnesium, and zinc may be protective against PD.
    Journal of the neurological sciences 07/2011; 306(1-2):98-102. · 2.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The evidence for associations between occupational factors and the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) is inconsistent. We assessed the risk of PD associated with various occupational factors in Japan. We examined 249 cases within 6 years of onset of PD. Control subjects were 369 inpatients and outpatients without neurodegenerative disease. Information on occupational factors was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire. Relative risks of PD were estimated using odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on logistic regression. Adjustments were made for gender, age, region of residence, educational level, and pack-years of smoking. Working in a professional or technical occupation tended to be inversely related to the risk of PD: adjusted OR was 0.59 (95% CI: 0.32-1.06, P = 0.08). According to a stratified analysis by gender, the decreased risk of PD for persons in professional or technical occupations was statistically significant only for men. Adjusted ORs for a professional or technical occupation among men and women were 0.22 (95% CI: 0.06-0.67) and 0.99 (0.47-2.07), respectively, and significant interaction was observed (P = 0.048 for homogeneity of OR). In contrast, risk estimates for protective service occupations and transport or communications were increased, although the results were not statistically significant: adjusted ORs were 2.73 (95% CI: 0.56-14.86) and 1.74 (95% CI: 0.65-4.74), respectively. No statistical significance was seen in data concerning exposure to occupational agents and the risk of PD, although roughly a 2-fold increase in OR was observed for workers exposed to stone or sand. The results of our study suggest that occupational factors do not play a substantial etiologic role in this population. However, among men, professional or technical occupations may decrease the risk of PD.
    BMC Neurology 07/2011; 11:83. · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Apolipoprotein E (APOE) is associated with increased oxidative stress, which is caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) activity may also increase formation of neurotoxins such as ROS. As Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, both the APOE and CYP2E1 genes that are involved in neurodegeneration by oxidative stress may be associated with PD risk. We investigated the relationship of the APOE and CYP2E1 rs2864987 polymorphisms and PD risk with special attention to the interaction with alcohol consumption among 238 patients with PD and 296 controls in a Japanese population. The frequencies of the ɛ2, ɛ3, and ɛ4 alleles of the APOE polymorphism among controls were 3.72, 86.7, and 9.63%, respectively. As compared with the APOE ε3/ε3 genotype, the 2/ε4 genotype was associated with an increased risk of PD (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 9.50, 95% (confidence interval) CI = 1.12-80.6). The presence of the ε3 allele was associated with a decreased risk of PD. Meanwhile, CYP2E1 rs2864987 was not associated with PD risk. Although CYP2E1 is involved in the metabolism of alcohol, there was no evidence of interaction between alcohol consumption and CYP2E1 rs2864987. Our results suggested that the APOE polymorphism might play an important role in PD susceptibility in our Japanese population. Future studies involving larger control and case populations and better alcohol consumption histories will undoubtedly lead to a more thorough understanding of the role of polymorphisms of genes related to the generation of ROS in PD development.
    Journal of Neural Transmission 03/2011; 118(9):1335-44. · 3.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies that have addressed the association between the intake of coffee or caffeine and Parkinson's disease (PD) were conducted mainly in Western countries. Little is known about this relationship in an Asian population. Therefore, we performed an assessment of the association of the intake of coffee, other caffeine-containing beverages, and caffeine with the risk of PD in Japan. The study involved 249 PD cases and 368 control subjects. Information on dietary factors was obtained through a self-administered diet history questionnaire. Adjustment was made for sex, age, region of residence, educational level, pack-years of smoking, body mass index, the dietary glycemic index, and intake of cholesterol, vitamin E, β-carotene, vitamin B(6,) alcohol, and iron. Intake of coffee, black tea, and Japanese and Chinese teas was significantly inversely associated with the risk of PD: the adjusted odds ratios in comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile were 0.52, 0.58, and 0.59, respectively (95% confidence intervals = 0.30-0.90, 0.35-0.97, and 0.35-0.995, respectively). A clear inverse dose-response relationship between total caffeine intake and PD risk was observed. We confirmed that the intake of coffee and caffeine reduced the risk of PD. Furthermore, this is the first study to show a significant inverse relationship between the intake of Japanese and Chinese teas and the risk of PD.
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders 03/2011; 17(6):446-50. · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Three previous cohort studies in the USA reported that dairy product consumption was significantly associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in men, but not in women. We examined the relationship between consumption of dairy products, calcium, and vitamin D and the risk of PD using data from a multicenter hospital-based case-control study in Japan. Included were 249 cases within 6 years of onset of PD based on the UK PD Society Brain Bank clinical diagnostic criteria. Controls were 368 inpatients and outpatients without a neurodegenerative disease. Information on dietary factors was collected using a validated self-administered diet history questionnaire. Adjustment was made for sex, age, region of residence, pack-years of smoking, years of education, body mass index, and dietary factors including cholesterol, dietary glycemic index, vitamin E, β-carotene, vitamin B(6), caffeine, iron, and alcohol. Total dairy product consumption was not materially associated with the risk of PD (P for trend = 0.62). No evident relationships were observed between intake of milk, yogurt, cheese, or ice cream and the risk of PD (P for trend = 0.75, 0.63, 0.59, and 0.35, respectively). There were no measurable associations between consumption of calcium or vitamin D and PD (P for trend = 0.37 and 0.69, respectively). No significant interactions were observed between the dietary exposures and sex regarding PD. Our results suggest that intake of dairy products, calcium, and vitamin D was not related to PD, regardless of sex. However, such null relationships might be a consequence of PD.
    Parkinsonism & Related Disorders 02/2011; 17(2):112-6. · 3.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: antioxidant vitamins are expected to protect cells from oxidative damage by neutralizing the effects of reactive oxygen species. However, epidemiological evidence regarding the associations between antioxidant vitamin intake and Parkinson's disease (PD) is limited and inconsistent. We investigated the relationship between dietary intake of selected antioxidant vitamins, vegetables and fruit and the risk of PD in Japan using data from a multicenter hospital-based case-control study. included were 249 patients within 6 years of onset of PD. Controls were 368 inpatients and outpatients without a neurodegenerative disease. Information on dietary factors was collected using a validated self-administered diet history questionnaire. Adjustment was made for sex, age, region of residence, pack-years of smoking, years of education, body mass index, dietary intake of cholesterol, alcohol, total dairy products, and coffee and the dietary glycemic index. higher consumption of vitamin E and β-carotene was significantly associated with a reduced risk of PD after adjustment for confounders under study: the adjusted odds ratio in the highest quartile was 0.45 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.25-0.79, P for trend = 0.009) for vitamin E and 0.56 (95% CI: 0.33-0.97, P for trend = 0.03) for β-carotene. Stratified by sex, such inverse associations were significant only in women. No material relationships were shown between intake of vitamin C, α-carotene, cryptoxanthin, green and yellow vegetables, other vegetables, or fruit and the risk of PD. higher intake of vitamin E and β-carotene may be associated with a decreased risk of PD.
    European Journal of Neurology 01/2011; 18(1):106-13. · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although some epidemiologic studies found inverse associations between alcohol drinking and Parkinson's disease (PD), the majority of studies found no such significant associations. Additionally, there is only limited research into the possible interactions of alcohol intake with aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 2 activity with respect to PD risk. We examined the relationship between alcohol intake and PD among Japanese subjects using data from a case-control study. From 214 cases within 6 years of PD onset and 327 controls without neurodegenerative disease, we collected information on "peak", as opposed to average, alcohol drinking frequency and peak drinking amounts during a subject's lifetime. Alcohol flushing status was evaluated via questions, as a means of detecting inactive ALHD2. The multivariate model included adjustments for sex, age, region of residence, smoking, years of education, body mass index, alcohol flushing status, presence of selected medication histories, and several dietary factors. Alcohol intake during peak drinking periods, regardless of frequency or amount, was not associated with PD. However, when we assessed daily ethanol intake separately for each type of alcohol, only Japanese sake (rice wine) was significantly associated with PD (adjusted odds ratio of ≥66.0 g ethanol per day: 3.39, 95% confidence interval: 1.10-11.0, P for trend = 0.001). There was no significant interaction of alcohol intake with flushing status in relation to PD risk. We did not find significant associations between alcohol intake and PD, except for the daily amount of Japanese sake. Effect modifications by alcohol flushing status were not observed.
    BMC Neurology 11/2010; 10:111. · 2.56 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

264 Citations
111.52 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2012
    • Fukuoka University
      • • Faculty of Medicine
      • • Department of Public Health
      Hukuoka, Fukuoka, Japan
  • 2011
    • Kohno Clinical Medicine Research Institute
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2010–2011
    • Kyushu University
      • Department of Neurology
      Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka-ken, Japan
    • Osaka City University
      • Department of Public Health
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 2009–2011
    • The University of Tokyo
      • School of Public Health
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan
  • 2001
    • Kyoto University
      • Department of Neurology
      Kyoto, Kyoto-fu, Japan