Timothy M Clay

Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, United States

Are you Timothy M Clay?

Claim your profile

Publications (107)460.94 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE:: To determine whether 1 of 2 vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) and poxvectors encoding CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) and MUC1 (PANVAC) would lengthen survival in patients with resected metastases of colorectal cancer (CRC). BACKGROUND:: Recurrences after complete resections of metastatic CRC remain frequent. Immune responses to CRC are associated with fewer recurrences, suggesting a role for cancer vaccines as adjuvant therapy. Both DCs and poxvectors are potent stimulators of immune responses against cancer antigens. METHODS:: Patients, disease-free after CRC metastasectomy and perioperative chemotherapy (n = 74), were randomized to injections of autologous DCs modified with PANVAC (DC/PANVAC) or PANVAC with per injection GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Endpoints were recurrence-free survival overall survival, and rate of CEA-specific immune responses. Clinical outcome was compared with that of an unvaccinated, contemporary group of patients who had undergone CRC metastasectomy, received similar perioperative therapy, and would have otherwise been eligible for the study. RESULTS:: Recurrence-free survival at 2 years was similar (47% and 55% for DC/PANVAC and PANVAC/GM-CSF, respectively) (χ P = 0.48). At a median follow-up of 35.7 months, there were 2 of 37 deaths in the DC/PANVAC arm and 5 of 37 deaths in the PANVAC/GM-CSF arm. The rate and magnitude of T-cell responses against CEA was statistically similar between study arms. As a group, vaccinated patients had superior survival compared with the contemporary unvaccinated group. CONCLUSIONS:: Both DC and poxvector vaccines have similar activity. Survival was longer for vaccinated patients than for a contemporary unvaccinated group, suggesting that a randomized trial of poxvector vaccinations compared with standard follow-up after metastasectomy is warranted. (NCT00103142).
    Annals of surgery 05/2013; · 7.90 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: First-generation, E1-deleted adenovirus subtype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors, although promising platforms for use as cancer vaccines, are impeded in activity by naturally occurring or induced Ad-specific neutralizing antibodies. Ad5-based vectors with deletions of the E1 and the E2b regions (Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]), the latter encoding the DNA polymerase and the pre-terminal protein, by virtue of diminished late phase viral protein expression, were hypothesized to avoid immunological clearance and induce more potent immune responses against the encoded tumor antigen transgene in Ad-immune hosts. Indeed, multiple homologous immunizations with Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D), encoding the tumor antigen carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), induced CEA-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses with antitumor activity in mice despite the presence of preexisting or induced Ad5-neutralizing antibody. In the present phase I/II study, cohorts of patients with advanced colorectal cancer were immunized with escalating doses of Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D). CEA-specific CMI responses were observed despite the presence of preexisting Ad5 immunity in a majority (61.3 %) of patients. Importantly, there was minimal toxicity, and overall patient survival (48 % at 12 months) was similar regardless of preexisting Ad5 neutralizing antibody titers. The results demonstrate that, in cancer patients, the novel Ad5 [E1-, E2b-] gene delivery platform generates significant CMI responses to the tumor antigen CEA in the setting of both naturally acquired and immunization-induced Ad5-specific immunity.
    Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy 04/2013; · 3.64 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sustained HER2 signaling at the cell surface is an oncogenic mechanism in a significant proportion of breast cancers. While clinically effective therapies targeting HER2 such as mAbs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors exist, tumors overexpressing HER2 eventually progress despite treatment. Thus, abrogation of persistent HER2 expression at the plasma membrane to synergize with current approaches may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. We generated polyclonal anti-HER2 antibodies (HER2-VIA) by vaccinating mice with an adenovirus expressing human HER2, and assessed their signaling effects in vitro and anti-tumor effects in a xenograft model. In addition, we studied the signaling effects of human HER2-specific antibodies induced by vaccinating breast cancer patients with a HER2 protein vaccine. HER2-VIA bound HER2 at the plasma membrane, initially activating the downstream kinases extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 and Akt, but subsequently inducing receptor internalization in clathrin-coated pits in a HER2 kinase-independent manner, followed by ubiquitination and degradation of HER2 into a 130 kDa fragment phosphorylated at tyrosine residues 1,221/1,222 and 1,248. Following vaccination of breast cancer patients with the HER2 protein vaccine, HER2-specific antibodies were detectable and these antibodies bound to cell surface-expressed HER2 and inhibited HER2 signaling through blocking tyrosine 877 phosphorylation of HER2. In contrast to the murine antibodies, human anti-HER2 antibodies induced by protein vaccination did not mediate receptor internalization and degradation. These data provide new insight into HER2 trafficking at the plasma membrane and the changes induced by polyclonal HER2-specific antibodies. The reduction of HER2 membrane expression and HER2 signaling by polyclonal antibodies induced by adenoviral HER2 vaccines supports human clinical trials with this strategy for those breast cancer patients with HER2 therapy-resistant disease.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 06/2012; 14(3):R89. · 5.87 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-based replicon particle (VRPs) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP-expressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and antitumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associated antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (VRP-CEA(6D)), and VRP-IL-12 was also administered at the same site or at a distant location. CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses were measured. To determine antitumor activity, mice were implanted with MC38-CEA-2 cells and immunized with VRP-CEA with and without VRP-IL-12, and tumor growth and mouse survival were measured. VRP-IL-12 greatly enhanced CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses when combined with VRP-CEA(6D) vaccination. VRP-IL-12 was superior to IL-12 protein at enhancing immune responses. Vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) plus VRP-IL-12 was superior to VRP-CEA(6D) or VRP-IL-12 alone in inducing antitumor activity and prolonging survival in tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, local injection of VRP-IL-12 at the VRP-CEA(6D) injection site provided more potent activation of CEA-specific immune responses than that of VRP-IL-12 injected at a distant site from the VRP-CEA injections. Together, this study shows that VRP-IL-12 enhances vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) and was more effective at activating CEA-specific T cell responses when locally expressed at the vaccine site. Clinical trials evaluating the adjuvant effect of VRP-IL-12 at enhancing the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines are warranted.
    Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy 04/2012; · 3.64 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite advances in contemporary chemotherapeutic strategies, long-term survival still remains elusive for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. A better understanding of the molecular markers of drug sensitivity to match therapy with patient is needed to improve clinical outcomes. In this study, we used in vitro drug sensitivity data from the NCI-60 cell lines together with their Affymetrix microarray data to develop a gene expression signature to predict sensitivity to oxaliplatin. To validate our oxaliplatin sensitivity signature, patient-derived colorectal cancer explants (PDCCE) were developed in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice from resected human colorectal tumors. Analysis of gene expression profiles found similarities between the PDCCEs and their parental human tumors, suggesting their utility to study drug sensitivity in vivo. The oxaliplatin sensitivity signature was then validated in vivo with response data from 14 PDCCEs treated with oxaliplatin and was found to have an accuracy of 92.9% (sensitivity = 87.5%; specificity = 100%). Our findings suggest that PDCCEs can be a novel source to study drug sensitivity in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, genomic-based analysis has the potential to be incorporated into future strategies to optimize individual therapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.
    Molecular Cancer Therapeutics 02/2012; 11(7):1500-9. · 5.60 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Patients with HER2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer, despite initially benefiting from the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab and the EGFR/HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib, will eventually have progressive disease. HER2-based vaccines induce polyclonal antibody responses against HER2 that demonstrate enhanced anti-tumor activity when combined with lapatinib in murine models. We wished to test the clinical safety, immunogenicity, and activity of a HER2-based cancer vaccine, when combined with lapatinib. We immunized women (n = 12) with metastatic, trastuzumab-refractory, HER2-overexpressing breast cancer with dHER2, a recombinant protein consisting of extracellular domain (ECD) and a portion of the intracellular domain (ICD) of HER2 combined with the adjuvant AS15, containing MPL, QS21, CpG and liposome. Lapatinib (1250 mg/day) was administered concurrently. Peripheral blood antibody and T cell responses were measured. This regimen was well tolerated, with no cardiotoxicity. Anti-HER2-specific antibody was induced in all patients whereas HER2-specific T cells were detected in one patient. Preliminary analyses of patient serum demonstrated downstream signaling inhibition in HER2 expressing tumor cells. The median time to progression was 55 days, with the majority of patients progressing prior to induction of peak anti-HER2 immune responses; however, 300-day overall survival was 92% (95% CI: 77-100%). dHER2 combined with lapatinib was safe and immunogenic with promising long term survival in those with HER2-overexpressing breast cancers refractory to trastuzumab. Further studies to define the anticancer activity of the antibodies induced by HER2 vaccines along with lapatinib are underway. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00952692.
    Journal of Translational Medicine 02/2012; 10:28. · 3.46 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Pompe disease can be treated effectively, if immune tolerance to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) is present. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying a liver-specific regulatory cassette to drive GAA expression (AAV-LSPhGAA) established immune tolerance in GAA knockout (KO) mice, whereas ubiquitous expression with AAV-CBhGAA provoked immune responses. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that immune tolerance induced by hepatic-restricted expression was dominant. AAV-LSPhGAA and AAV-CBhGAA were administered singly or in combination to groups of adult GAA-KO mice, and AAV-LSPhGAA induced immune tolerance even in combination with AAV-CBhGAA. The dual vector approach to GAA expression improved biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and glycogen accumulations at 18 weeks, and improved motor function testing including wire-hang and grip-strength testing. The greatest efficacy was demonstrated by dual vector administration, when both vectors were pseudotyped as AAV8. T cells from mice injected with AAV-LSPhGAA failed to proliferate at all after an immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant, whereas mock-treated GAA-KO mice mounted vigorous T cell proliferation. Unlike AAV-LSPhGAA, AAV-CBhGAA induced selective cytokine and chemokine expression in liver and spleen after the immune challenge. AAV-CBhGAA transduced dendritic cells and expressed high-level GAA, whereas AAV-LSPhGAA failed to express GAA in dendritic cells. The level of transduction in liver was much higher after dual AAV8 vector administration at 18 weeks, in comparison with either vector alone. Dual vector administration failed to provoke antibody formation in response to GAA expression with AAV-CBhGAA; however, hepatic-restricted expression from dual vector expression did not prevent antibody formation after a strong immune challenge with GAA and adjuvant. The relevance of immune tolerance to gene therapy in Pompe disease indicates that hepatic expression might best be combined with nonhepatic expression, achieving the benefits of ubiquitous expression in addition to evading deleterious immune responses.
    Human gene therapy 01/2012; 23(5):460-72. · 4.20 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Breast cancers with a basal-like gene signature are primarily triple-negative, frequently metastatic, and carry a poor prognosis. Basal-like breast cancers are enriched for markers of breast cancer stem cells as well as markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). While EMT is generally thought to be important in the process of metastasis, in vivo evidence of EMT in human disease remains rare. Here we report a novel model of human triple-negative breast cancer, the DKAT cell line, which was isolated from an aggressive, treatment-resistant triple-negative breast cancer that demonstrated morphological and biochemical evidence suggestive of phenotypic plasticity in the patient. The DKAT cell line displays a basal-like phenotype in vitro when cultured in serum-free media, and undergoes phenotypic changes consistent with EMT/MET in response to serum-containing media, a unique property among the breast cancer cell lines we tested. This EMT is marked by increased expression of the transcription factor Zeb1, and Zeb1 is required for the enhanced migratory ability of DKAT cells in the mesenchymal state. DKAT cells also express progenitor-cell markers, and single DKAT cells are able to generate tumorspheres containing both epithelial and mesenchymal cell types. In vivo, as few as ten DKAT cells are capable of forming xenograft tumors which display a range of epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes. The DKAT model provides a novel model to study the molecular mechanisms regulating phenotypic plasticity and the aggressive biology of triple-negative breast cancers.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(9):e45684. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (T(reg)) impair anti-tumor and anti-viral immunity. As there are higher T(reg) levels in cancer patients compared with healthy individuals, there is considerable interest in eliminating them or altering their function as part of cancer or viral immunotherapy strategies. The scurfin transcriptional regulator encoded by the member of the forkhead winged helix protein family (FOXP3) is critical for maintaining the functions of T(reg). We hypothesized that targeting FOXP3 expression with a novel arginine-rich, cell-penetrating, peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PPMO) based antisense would eliminate T(reg) and enhance the induction of effector T-cell responses. We observed that the PPMO was taken up by activated T cells in vitro and could downregulate FOXP3 expression, which otherwise increases during antigen-specific T-cell activation. Generation of antigen-specific T cells in response to peptide stimulation was enhanced by pre-treatment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with the FOXP3-targeted PPMO. In summary, modulation of T(reg) levels using the FOXP3 PPMO antisense-based genomic strategy has the potential to optimize immunotherapy strategies in cancer and viral immunotherapy.
    Cancer gene therapy 01/2012; 19(1):30-7. · 3.13 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While many tumor associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified in human cancers, efforts to develop efficient TAA "cancer vaccines" using classical vaccine approaches have been largely ineffective. Recently, a process to specifically target proteins to exosomes has been established which takes advantage of the ability of the factor V like C1C2 domain of lactadherin to specifically address proteins to exosomes. Using this approach, we hypothesized that TAAs could be targeted to exosomes to potentially increase their immunogenicity, as exosomes have been demonstrated to traffic to antigen presenting cells (APC). To investigate this possibility, we created adenoviral vectors expressing the extracellular domain (ECD) of two non-mutated TAAs often found in tumors of cancer patients, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and HER2, and coupled them to the C1C2 domain of lactadherin. We found that these C1C2 fusion proteins had enhanced expression in exosomes in vitro. We saw significant improvement in antigen specific immune responses to each of these antigens in naïve and tolerant transgenic animal models and could further demonstrate significantly enhanced therapeutic anti-tumor effects in a human HER2+ transgenic animal model. These findings demonstrate that the mode of secretion and trafficking can influence the immunogenicity of different human TAAs, and may explain the lack of immunogenicity of non-mutated TAAs found in cancer patients. They suggest that exosomal targeting could enhance future anti-tumor vaccination protocols. This targeting exosome process could also be adapted for the development of more potent vaccines in some viral and parasitic diseases where the classical vaccine approach has demonstrated limitations.
    Vaccine 11/2011; 29(50):9361-7. · 3.77 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A small subset of T cells (gamma-delta T cells) is able to recognize phosphoantigens that are overexpressed in some cancer cells and may selectively target and kill cancer cells with high levels of phosphoantigen. Moreover, nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates, such as zoledronic acid, are able to induce accumulation of specific phosphoantigens in some cancer cells. A recent preclinical study showed that gamma-delta T cells effectively targeted and killed zoledronic acid-treated estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer cells. These new data provide growing insight into a potential mechanism of action for some of the anticancer activity demonstrated by zoledronic acid in breast cancer clinical trials.
    Cancer Investigation 08/2011; 29(8):533-41. · 2.24 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation caused by adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations occurs in approximately 80% of sporadic colorectal cancers (CRC). The antihelminth compound niclosamide downregulates components of the Wnt pathway, specifically Dishevelled-2 (Dvl2) expression, resulting in diminished downstream β-catenin signaling. In this study, we determined whether niclosamide could inhibit the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in human CRCs and whether its inhibition might elicit antitumor effects in the presence of APC mutations. We found that niclosamide inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation, downregulated Dvl2, decreased downstream β-catenin signaling, and exerted antiproliferative effects in human colon cancer cell lines and CRC cells isolated by surgical resection of metastatic disease, regardless of mutations in APC. In contrast, inhibition of NF-κB or mTOR did not exert similar antiproliferative effects in these CRC model systems. In mice implanted with human CRC xenografts, orally administered niclosamide was well tolerated, achieved plasma and tumor levels associated with biologic activity, and led to tumor control. Our findings support clinical explorations to reposition niclosamide for the treatment of CRC.
    Cancer Research 06/2011; 71(12):4172-82. · 9.28 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: ErbB2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) block tyrosine autophosphorylation and activation of the full-length transmembrane ErbB2 receptor (p185(ErbB2)). In addition to p185(ErbB2), truncated forms of ErbB2 exist in breast cancer cell lines and clinical tumors. The contribution of these truncated forms, specifically those expressed in tumor cell nuclei, to the development of therapeutic resistance to ErbB2 TKIs has not been previously shown. Here, we show that expression of a 95-kDa tyrosine phosphorylated form of ErbB2, herein referred to as p95L (lapatinib-induced p95) was increased in ErbB2(+) breast cancer cells treated with potent ErbB2 TKIs (lapatinib, GW2974). Expressed in tumor cell nuclei, tyrosine phosphorylation of p95L was resistant to inhibition by ErbB2 TKIs. Furthermore, the expression of p95L was increased in ErbB2(+) breast cancer models of acquired therapeutic resistance to lapatinib that mimic the clinical setting. Pretreatment with proteasome inhibitors blocked p95L induction in response to ErbB2 TKIs, implicating the role of the proteasome in the regulation of p95L expression. In addition, tyrosine phosphorylated C-terminal fragments of ErbB2, generated by alternate initiation of translation and similar in molecular weight to p95L, were expressed in tumor cell nuclei, where they too were resistant to inhibition by ErbB2 TKIs. When expressed in the nuclei of lapatinib-sensitive ErbB2(+) breast cancer cells, truncated ErbB2 rendered cells resistant to lapatinib-induced apoptosis. Elucidating the function of nuclear, truncated forms of ErbB2, and developing therapeutic strategies to block their expression and/or activation may enhance the clinical efficacy of ErbB2 TKIs.
    Molecular Cancer Therapeutics 06/2011; 10(8):1367-74. · 5.60 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The use of tumor-derived proteins as cancer vaccines is complicated by tolerance to these self-antigens. Tolerance may be broken by immunization with activated, autologous, ex vivo generated and antigen-loaded, antigen-presenting cells (APC); however, targeting tumor antigen directly to APC in vivo would be a less complicated strategy. We wished to test whether targeted delivery of an otherwise poorly immunogenic, soluble antigen to APC through their mannose receptors (MR) would induce clinically relevant immunity. Two phase I studies were conducted with CDX-1307, a vaccine composed of human chorionic gonadotropin beta-chain (hCG-β) fused to an MR-specific monoclonal antibody, administered either locally (intradermally) or systemically (intravenously) in patients with advanced epithelial malignancies. An initial dose escalation of single-agent CDX-1307 was followed by additional cohorts of CDX-1307 combined with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 agonist polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly-ICLC) and TLR7/8 agonist resiquimod to activate the APC. CDX-1307 induced consistent humoral and T-cell responses to hCG-β when coadministered with TLR agonists. Greater immune responses and clinical benefit, including the longest duration of stable disease, were observed with immunization combined with local TLR agonists. Immune responses were induced equally efficiently in patients with elevated and nonelevated levels of serum hCG-β. Antibodies within the serum of vaccinated participants had tumor suppressive function in vitro. Toxicity consisted chiefly of mild injection site reactions. APC targeting and activation induce adaptive immunity against poorly immunogenic self-antigens which has implications for enhancing the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.
    Clinical Cancer Research 06/2011; 17(14):4844-53. · 7.84 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: HER2 overexpression occurs in approximately 25% of breast cancers, where it correlates with poor prognosis. Likewise, systemic inflammation in breast cancer correlates with poor prognosis, although the process is not understood. In this study, we explored the relationship between HER2 and inflammation, comparing the effects of overexpressing wild-type or mutated inactive forms of HER2 in primary human breast cells. Wild-type HER2 elicited a profound transcriptional inflammatory profile, including marked elevation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression, which we established to be a critical determinant of HER2 oncogenesis. Mechanistic investigations revealed that IL-6 secretion induced by HER2 overexpression activated Stat3 and altered gene expression, enforcing an autocrine loop of IL-6/Stat3 expression. Both mouse and human in vivo models of HER2-amplified breast carcinoma relied critically on this HER2-IL-6-Stat3 signaling pathway. Our studies offer the first direct evidence linking HER2 to a systemic inflammatory mechanism that orchestrates HER2-mediated tumor growth. We suggest that the HER2-IL-6-STAT3 signaling axis we have defined in breast cancer could prompt new therapeutic or prevention strategies for treatment of HER2-amplified cancers.
    Cancer Research 04/2011; 71(13):4380-91. · 9.28 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to test whether peptide epitopes chosen from among those naturally processed and overpresented within MHC molecules by malignant, but not normal cells, when formulated into cancer vaccines, could activate antitumor T-cell responses in humans. Mixtures of human leukocyte antigen A2 (HLA-A2)-binding ovarian cancer-associated peptides were used to activate naive T cells to generate antigen-specific T cells that could recognize ovarian and breast cancers in vitro. Combinations of these peptides (0.3 mg of each peptide or 1 mg of each peptide) were formulated into vaccines in conjunction with Montanide ISA-51 and granulocyte monocyte colony stimulating factor which were used to vaccinate patients with ovarian and breast cancer without evidence of clinical disease in parallel pilot clinical trials. T cells specific for individual peptides could be generated in vitro by using mixtures of peptides, and these T cells recognized ovarian and breast cancers but not nonmalignant cells. Patient vaccinations were well tolerated with the exception of local erythema and induration at the injection site. Nine of the 14 vaccinated patients responded immunologically to their vaccine by inducing peptide-specific T-cell responses that were capable of recognizing HLA-matched breast and ovarian cancer cells. Mixtures of specific peptides identified as naturally presented on cancer cells and capable of activating tumor-specific T cells in vitro also initiate or augment immune responses toward solid tumors in cancer patients.
    Clinical Cancer Research 02/2011; 17(10):3408-19. · 7.84 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Regulatory T cells (Treg) have become increasingly relevant in the study of human disease including cancer. Treg cells have been shown to inhibit anti-tumor immune responses, and elevated Treg levels have been associated with certain types of cancer. Similarly, depletion of Tregs by various methods can also enhance anti-tumor immune responses. We have found a prevalence of Treg in cancer patients when compared to normal volunteers. In addition, we have shown that the depletion of Treg using the IL-2 fusion protein denileukin diftitox decreased Treg function and increased antigen-specific T cell response to a cancer vaccine. These results indicate the potential for combining Treg depletion with anti-cancer vaccines to enhance tumor antigen-specific immune responses and the need to explore the dose and schedule of Treg depletion strategies in optimizing vaccine efforts.
    Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) 01/2011; 707:219-31. · 1.29 Impact Factor
  • Source
    BioMed Research International 01/2011; 2011:370374. · 2.88 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aberrant signaling pathways are a hallmark of cancer. A variety of strategies for inhibiting signaling pathways have been developed, but monoclonal antibodies against receptor tyrosine kinases have been among the most successful. A challenge for these therapies is therapeutic unresponsiveness and acquired resistance due to mutations in the receptors, upregulation of alternate growth and survival pathways, or inadequate function of the monoclonal antibodies. Vaccines are able to induce polyclonal responses that can have a multitude of affects against the target molecule. We began to explore therapeutic vaccine development to antigens associated with these signaling pathways. We provide an illustrative example in developing therapeutic cancer vaccines inducing polyclonal adaptive immune responses targeting the ErbB family member HER2. Further, we will discuss new strategies to augment the clinical efficacy of cancer vaccines by enhancing vaccine immunogenicity and reversing the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.
    Immunologic Research 12/2010; 49(1-3):235-47. · 2.96 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The cell surface proteoglycan, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4), is a potential target for monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based immunotherapy for many types of cancer. The lack of effective therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) prompted us to examine whether CSPG4 is expressed in TNBC and can be targeted with CSPG4-specific mAb. CSPG4 protein expression was assessed in 44 primary TNBC lesions, in TNBC cell lines HS578T, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435, and SUM149, and in tumor cells in pleural effusions from 12 metastatic breast cancer patients. The effect of CSPG4-specific mAb 225.28 on growth, adhesion, and migration of TNBC cells was tested in vitro. The ability of mAb 225.28 to induce regression of tumor metastases (n = 7 mice) and to inhibit spontaneous metastasis and tumor recurrence (n = 12 mice per group) was tested in breast cancer models in mice. The mechanisms responsible for the antitumor effect of mAb 225.28 were also investigated in the cell lines and in the mouse models. All statistical tests were two-sided. CSPG4 protein was preferentially expressed in 32 of the 44 (72.7%) primary TNBC lesions tested, in TNBC cell lines, and in tumor cells in pleural effusions from 12 metastatic breast cancer patients. CSPG4-specific mAb 225.28 statistically significantly inhibited growth, adhesion, and migration of TNBC cells in vitro. mAb 225.28 induced 73.1% regression of tumor metastasis in a TNBC cell-derived experimental lung metastasis model (mAb 225.28 vs control, mean area of metastatic nodules = 44590.8 vs 165950.8 μm(2); difference of mean = 121360.0 μm(2), 95% confidence interval = 91010.7 to 151709.4 μm(2); P < .001). Additionally, mAb 225.28 statistically significantly reduced spontaneous lung metastases and tumor recurrences in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model. The mechanisms responsible for antitumor effect included increased apoptosis and reduced mitotic activity in tumor cells, decreased blood vessel density in the tumor microenvironment, and reduced activation of signaling pathways involved in cell survival, proliferation and metastasis. This study identified CSPG4 as a new target for TNBC. The antitumor activity of CSPG4-specific mAb was mediated by multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of signaling pathways crucial for TNBC cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis.
    CancerSpectrum Knowledge Environment 10/2010; 102(19):1496-512. · 14.07 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

3k Citations
460.94 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2013
    • Duke University Medical Center
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • Division of Medical Oncology
      Durham, NC, United States
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Branch of Surgery
      Bethesda, MD, United States
  • 2010
    • Medical University of South Carolina
      • Division of General Surgery
      Charleston, SC, United States
  • 2009
    • University of Chicago
      • Department of Surgery
      Chicago, IL, United States
  • 2008
    • Duke University
      Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • 2005
    • The University of Chicago Medical Center
      • Department of Surgery
      Chicago, IL, United States
  • 1999–2000
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • Surgery Branch
      Bethesda, MD, United States