T Jørgensen

Rigshospitalet, København, Capital Region, Denmark

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Publications (7)12.03 Total impact

  • K Brasso, S Friis, K Juel, T Jørgensen, P Iversen
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    ABSTRACT: Until recently, expectant management of localised prostate cancer was the routine strategy in Denmark. In a historical, prospective, case-control study, morbidity in 4744 patients, aged 74 years or younger, with newly diagnosed clinically localised prostate cancer, was compared to that in an age-matched background population. Patients with clinically localised prostate cancer were found to have significant excess morbidity compared to the background population. Patients were admitted 6.7 times more often than the controls in the year prostate cancer was diagnosed and 2.7 times more often in the nine years following the diagnosis. When adjusted for prostate cancer-related admissions, morbidity approximates unity. Costs associated with the hospital care of patients with prostate cancer significantly exceeded the costs in the control group. The study demonstrates that patients with newly diagnosed, clinically localised prostate cancer have a significant morbidity associated to their primary malignancy. Further, these patients were found to have a significant excess morbidity compared to age-matched controls. The possibility of reducing morbidity and associated costs is discussed.
    Ugeskrift for laeger 11/2001; 163(41):5673-6.
  • K Brasso, S Friis, K Juel, T Jørgensen, P Iversen
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    ABSTRACT: We studied the need for hospital care of patients 74 years old or younger with clinically localized prostate cancer managed by deferred endocrine therapy. Our series included all cases of newly diagnosed, clinically localized prostate cancer reported to the Danish Cancer Registry from 1977 to 1992. Information on the number of hospitalizations and operations performed from 1977 to 1994 was obtained from the Danish Hospital Discharge Registry. Our study included 4,790 men 37 to 74 years old with clinically localized prostate cancer. During the year of diagnosis and once a year of the following 9 years patients were hospitalized an average of 2.2 and 1 times and remained hospitalized an average of 22 and 10 days, and prostate cancer accounted for approximately 80% and 67% of hospitalizations the year of diagnosis and once a year subsequently. Nearly 90% of patients underwent transurethral prostatic resection within the year of diagnosis and in 30% repeat resection was necessary. A third of the patients underwent orchiectomy during the study period. Median time from the diagnosis to orchiectomy was 23 months. The estimated probability of surviving 5 and 10 years without orchiectomy was 39% and 17%, respectively. Patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer managed expectantly had a substantial need for hospital care in the years after the diagnosis. When evaluating outcome and quality of life after treatment of localized prostate cancer, the cost and impact of associated morbidity must be considered as well as patient survival.
    The Journal of Urology 05/2000; 163(4):1150-4. · 3.75 Impact Factor
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    K Brasso, S Friis, K Juel, T Jørgensen, P Iversen
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the morbidity in patients with newly diagnosed clinically localized prostate cancer managed conservatively with the morbidity in a randomly selected age-matched background population with no history of prostate cancer. Patients younger than 75 y at diagnosis with newly diagnosed clinically localized prostate cancer reported to the Danish Cancer Registry in the period 1977-1992. Morbidity in patients and age-matched controls was extracted from The Danish Hospital Discharge Registry. Admissions were stratified by discharge diagnosis. Overall 4744 patients were hospitalized for 251,695 days within the first 10 y following diagnosis compared with 74,563 days in 4774 age-matched controls. The patients were admitted 6.7 (6.4-7.1) times more often than controls in the year following diagnosis, and 2.7 (2.6-2.8) times more often in the following 9 y. Excess morbidity declined over time. When prostate cancer-related admissions were excluded, the relative risk of admission was reduced to 1.35 (1.3-1.4) and 0.86 (0.83-0.89), respectively. The estimated costs associated with deferred therapy in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer exceeded the estimated cost in age-matched controls by approximately US$88 million, equivalent to an average extra cost per patient of approximately US$18,500. Patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed conservatively had a significantly higher morbidity than age-matched controls due to admissions associated with prostate cancer. In future comparisons of treatment strategies, morbidity following treatment and impact on quality of life have to be included when evaluating the outcome.
    Prostate cancer and prostatic diseases 01/2000; 2(5/6):253-256. · 2.10 Impact Factor
  • K Brasso, S Friis, K Juel, T Jørgensen, P Iversen
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    ABSTRACT: We studied the outcome in patients with early and probably organ confined prostate cancer who were considered candidates for curative therapy and treated expectantly. The study included 2,570 patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer reported to the Danish Cancer Registry from 1943 to 1986 and surviving for 10 years or longer. Mortality and causes of death were analyzed and stratified by stage, age and time of diagnosis. Excess mortality was calculated from life expectancy tables for the general population. An overall excess mortality (standard mortality ratio 1.58, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.51 to 1.65) was found. Young age and advanced clinical stage at diagnosis entailed a higher risk of death from prostate cancer. Overall 42.7 and 19.1% of the patients who died had prostate cancer as the direct or contributing cause of death, respectively. Of the annual deaths 13% were attributable to prostate cancer. In 1,326 patients 55 to 64 and 65 to 74 years old with clinically localized prostate cancer at diagnosis the excess mortality was still significant (standard mortality ratio 1.72, 95% CI 1.54 to 1.93 and 1.50, 95% CI 1.39 to 1.62, respectively). Prostate cancer was the primary or contributing cause of death in 42.9% of the younger group and 21.5% of the older group. In these patients 15% of the annual deaths were related to prostate cancer. Patients with clinically localized prostate cancer for 10 years or longer, who were likely candidates for curative therapy when diagnosed, had significant excess mortality when treated expectantly.
    The Journal of Urology 03/1999; 161(2):524-8. · 3.75 Impact Factor
  • K Brasso, S Friis, K Juel, T Jørgensen, P Iversen
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    ABSTRACT: Computerized linkage between the Danish Cancer Registry and the Central Personal Registry was established. A total of 1459 men aged 55-74 years with newly diagnosed clinically localized prostate cancer in the period 1983-1987 were identified. Routine treatment in this period was observation and endocrine therapy in case of progression. Survival analysis demonstrated a significant excess mortality and a substantial loss of life expectancy.
    Ugeskrift for laeger 08/1998; 160(31):4517-20.
  • K Brasso, S Friis, S K Kjaer, T Jørgensen, P Iversen
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    ABSTRACT: To review the trends in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality rates in Denmark during a 50-year period. A population-based register study was performed of all new cases of PC recorded in the Danish Cancer Registry from 1943 to 1992. The age-standardized incidence rate for PC increased from 11.5/100,000 in 1943 to 1947 to 30.9/100,000 in 1988 to 1992. Age-specific incidence rates increased in all age groups over 50 years of age. Mortality rates increased from 13.5/100,000 in 1953 to 1957 to 17.8/100,000 in 1988 to 1992. No major changes in the distribution of age, stage at the time of diagnosis, or in diagnostic procedures were found, indicating that the observed change in incidence rates was not caused by attempted early detection or changes in diagnostic strategy. Our data suggest that the increased PC incidence observed during the period of cancer registration in Denmark represents a true increase in the number of patients with clinical PC.
    Urology 05/1998; 51(4):590-4. · 2.42 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Urology - J UROL. 01/1998; 160(4):1579-1579.

Publication Stats

51 Citations
12.03 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2000
    • Rigshospitalet
      • Department of Urology
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
    • IT University of Copenhagen
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
    • Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen University
      • Department of Surgery
      København, Capital Region, Denmark