J. Preble

Newport Laboratories, Worthington, Minnesota, United States

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Publications (76)24.14 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: After implementing a few design modifications (referred to as the “Modified Reference Design”) in 2009, the Vacuum Vessel (VV) design had been stabilized. The VV design is being finalized, including interface components such as support rails and feedthroughs for the in-vessel coils. It is necessary to make adjustments to the locations of the blanket supports and manifolds to accommodate design modifications to the in-vessel coils. The VV support design is also being finalized considering a structural simplification. Design of the in-wall shielding (IWS) has progressed, considering the assembly methods and the required tolerances. The detailed layout of ferritic steel plates and borated steel plates was optimized based on the toroidal field ripple analysis. A dynamic test on the inter-modular key to support the blanket modules was performed to measure the dynamic amplification factor (DAF). An R&D program has started to select and qualify the welding and cutting processes for the port flange lip seal. The ITER VV material 316 L(N) IG was already qualified and the Modified Reference Design was approved by the Agreed Notified Body (ANB) in accordance with the Nuclear Pressure Equipment Order procedure.
    Fusion Engineering and Design. 08/2012; 87(s 5–6):828–835.
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    ABSTRACT: Recent progress of the ITER thermal shields (TS) design is presented. As the ITER construction phase approaches, the design of the TS has been improved and developed in more detail with the focus on better performance, improved manufacture ability and successful assembly at the ITER-site. Aiming at the supply of the TS components to the ITER-site, the Procurement Arrangement with the Korean Domestic Agency (KO DA) was signed. In cooperation with the Korean industry, a preliminary study of the TS manufacture was performed – accompanied with several R&D activities (including manufacture of a full-size mock-up of the TS panel). Results of all above activities are described in this paper.
    Fusion Engineering and Design. 01/2011; 86:2051-2054.
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    ABSTRACT: The vacuum vessel (VV) design is being finalized including interface components, such as the support rails and feedthroughs of coils for mitigation of edge localized modes (ELM) and vertical stabilization (VS) of the plasma (ELM/VS coils). It was necessary to make adjustments in the locations of the blanket supports and manifolds to accommodate the design modifications in the ELM/VS coils. The lower port gussets were reinforced to keep a sufficient margin under the increased VV load conditions. The VV support design is being finalized as well, with an emphasis on structure simplification. The design of the in-wall shielding (IWS) has progressed, considering assembly and required tolerances. The layout of ferritic steel plates and borated steel plates will be optimized based on on-going toroidal field ripple analysis. The VV instrumentation was defined in detail. Strain gauges, thermocouples, displacement meters and accelerometers shall be installed to monitor the status of the VV in normal and off-normal conditions to confirm all safety functions are performed correctly. The ITER VV design was preliminarily approved, and the VV materials including 316L(N) IG were already qualified by the Agreed Notified Body (ANB) according to the procedure of Nuclear Pressure Equipment Order.
    Fusion Engineering and Design. 01/2011; 86:593-597.
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    ABSTRACT: The planned upgrade of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) requires ten new superconducting rf (SRF) cavity cryomodules to double the beam energy to the envisaged 12 GeV. Adequate cavity Higher Order Mode (HOM) suppression is essential to avoid multipass, multibunch beam break-up (BBU) instabilities of the recirculating beam. We report on detailed HOM surveys performed for the first two upgrade style cavities tested in a dedicated cavity pair cryomodule at 2K. The safety margin to the BBU threshold budget at 12 GeV has been assessed.
    SRF Workshop. 01/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the status and recent results from the development of new SRF cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade and for future light source applications. The JLab 12 GeV upgrade requires ten new high-performance CW cryomodules. These will each contain eight seven-cell cavities of a "low-loss" design with HOM damping sufficient for ~1mA of continuous current. Jlab has fabricated and tested a number of such cavities and demonstrated compliance with all 12 GeV project requirements with conventional BCP cavity processing. Recently we have also electro-polished several cavities of this type and shown significantly better performance than the standard BCP. This processing method could provide improved operational margin and lower cryogenic loads at the CEBAF working point. For future light source applications such as FELs or ERLs, cavities with higher beam current capability are desirable. Jlab has developed a high-current cavity for such applications with a cell shape optimized to optimize HOM power extraction and maximize the BBU threshold. We report on the latest tests of this design and on plans to assemble a two-cavity cryomodule for testing with beam in the recirculation loop of the JLab FEL.
    01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Collider Accelerator Department at BNL is in the final stages of developing the 20-MeV R and D energy recovery linac with super-conducting 2.5 MeV RF gun and single-mode super-conducting 5-cell RF linac. This unique facility aims to address many outstanding questions relevant for high current (up to 0.5 A of average current), high brightness energy-recovery linacs with novel ZigZag-type merger. Recent development in the R and D ERL plans include gun and 5-cell cavity (G5) test and possibility of using R and D ERL for proof-of-principle test of Coherent Electron Cooling at RHIC.
    06/2008
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    ABSTRACT: One of the key components for the Energy Recovery Linac being built by the Electron cooling group in the Collider Accelerator Department is the 5 cell accelerating cavity which is designed to accelerate 2 MeV electrons from the gun up to 15-20 MeV, allow them to make one pass through the ring and then decelerate them back down to 2 MeV prior to sending them to the dump. This cavity was designed by BNL and fabricated by AES in Medford, NY. Following fabrication it was sent to Thomas Jefferson Lab in VA for chemical processing, testing and assembly into a string assembly suitable for shipment back to BNL for integration into the ERL. The steps involved in this processing sequence will be reviewed and the deviations from processing of similar SRF cavities will be discussed. The lessons learned from this process are documented to help future projects where the scope is different from that normally encountered.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2007. PAC. IEEE; 07/2007
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    ABSTRACT: Operation of the JLab IR Upgrade FEL at CW powers in excess of 10 kW requires sustained production of high electron beam powers by the driver ERL. This in turn demands attention to numerous issues and effects, including: cathode lifetime; control of beamline and RF system vacuum during high current operation; longitudinal space charge; longitudinal and transverse matching of irregular/large volume phase space distributions; halo management; management of remnant dispersive effects; resistive wall, wake-field, and RF heating of beam vacuum chambers; the beam break up instability; the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (both on beam quality and the performance of laser optics); magnetic component stability and reproducibility; and RF stability and reproducibility. We discuss our experience with these issues and describe the modus vivendi that has evolved during prolonged high current, high power beam and laser operation.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2007. PAC. IEEE; 07/2007
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we present status and plans for the 20- MeV R&D energy recovery linac (ERL), which is under construction at Collider Accelerator Department at BNL. The facility is based on high current (up to 0.5 A of average current) super-conducting 2.5 MeV RF gun,single-mode super-conducting 5-cell RF linac and about 20-m long return loop with very flexible lattice. The R&D ERL, which is planned for commissioning in early 2009, aims to address many outstanding questions relevant for high current, high brightness energy-recovery linacs.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2007. PAC. IEEE; 07/2007
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    ABSTRACT: The physics interest in a luminosity upgrade of RHIC requires the development of a cooling-frontier facility. Detailed calculations were made of electron cooling of the stored RHIC beams. This has been followed by beam dynamics simulations to establish the feasibility of creating the necessary electron beam. The electron beam accelerator will be a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An intensive experimental R&D program engages the various elements of the accelerator, as described by 24 contributions to the 2007 PAC.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2007. PAC. IEEE; 07/2007
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    ABSTRACT: The Thomas Jefferson national accelerator facility has begun a cryomodule refurbishment project. The goal of this project is robust 6 GeV, 5 pass operation of the continuous electron beam accelerator facility (CEBAF). The scope of the project includes removing, refurbishing and replacing 10 CEBAF cryomodules at a rate of three per year. Refurbishment includes reprocessing of SRF cavities to eliminate field emission and increase the nominal gradient from the original 5 MV/m to 12.5 MV/m. New "dogleg" couplers between the cavity and helium vessel flanges will intercept secondary electrons that produce arcing on the 2 K ceramic window in the fundamental power coupler (FPC). Modification of the Qext of the FPC will allow higher gradient operations. Other changes include new ceramic RF windows for the air to vacuum interface of the FPC and improvements to the mechanical tuners. Any damaged or worn components will be replaced as well. Currently, the first of the refurbished cryomodules has been installed and tested both in the cryomodule test facility and in place in the North Linac of CEBAF. This paper will summarize the results of these tests.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2007. PAC. IEEE; 07/2007
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    ABSTRACT: A number of “Grand Challenges” in Science have recently been identified in reports from The National Academy of Sciences, and the US Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. Many of these require a new generation of linac-based light source to study dynamical and non-linear phenomena in nanoscale samples. In this paper we present a summary of the properties of such light sources, comparing them with existing sources, and then describing in more detail a specific source at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Importantly, the JLab light source has developed some novel technology which is a critical enabler for other new light sources.
    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A Accelerators Spectrometers Detectors and Associated Equipment 01/2007; · 1.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The design, fabrication and commissioning of a 703.75 MHz SRF photoinjector with a retractable multi-alkali photocathode designed to deliver 0.5 A average current at 100% duty factor is the present undertaking of the electron cooling group in the Collider Accelerator Division of Brookhaven National Labs. This photoinjector represents the state of the art in photoinjector technology, orders of magnitude beyond the presently available technology, and should be commissioned by 2007. The R&D effort presently underway, and the focus of this paper, will address the numerous technological challenges that must be met for this project to succeed. These include the novel physics design of the cavity, the challenges of inserting and operating a multi-alkali photocathode in the photoinjector at these high average currents, and the design and installation of a laser system capable of delivering the required 10 s of watts of laser power needed to make this photoinjector operational.
    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment. 02/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches.These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz ∼ half cycle pulse whose average brightness is >5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted [Carr, et al., Nature 420 (2002) 153]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power.The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [Neil, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 662]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 μm in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300–1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 ms long at high repetition rates to continuous operation.The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the discoveries we have made concerning the physics performance, design optimization, and operational limitations of such a first generation high power ERL light source.
    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment. 01/2006;
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    Conference Paper: Electron Cooling of RHIC
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    ABSTRACT: We report progress on the R&D program for electron-cooling of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This electron cooler is designed to cool 100 GeV/nucleon at storage energy using 54 MeV electrons. The electron source will be a superconducting RF photocathode gun. The accelerator will be a superconducting energy recovery linac. The frequency of the accelerator is set at 703.75 MHz. The maximum electron bunch frequency is 9.38 MHz, with bunch charge of 20 nC. The R&D program has the following components: The photoinjector and its photocathode, the superconducting linac cavity, start-to-end beam dynamics with magnetized electrons, electron cooling calculations including benchmarking experiments and development of a large superconducting solenoid. The photoinjector and linac cavity are being incorporated into an energy recovery linac aimed at demonstrating ampere class current at about 20 MeV.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2005. PAC 2005. Proceedings of the; 06/2005
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    ABSTRACT: Thomas Jefferson National Accelerating Facility (Jefferson Lab) has completed production of 24 Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cryomodules for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) superconducting linac. This includes one medium-β (0.61) prototype, eleven medium-β and twelve high-β (0.81) production cryomodules. Nine medium-β cryomodules as well as two high-β cryomodules have undergone complete operational performance testing in the Cryomodule Test Facility at Jefferson Lab. The set of tests includes measurements of maximum gradient, unloaded Q (Q 0 ), microphonics, and response to Lorentz forces. The Q ext ’s of the various couplers are measured and the behavior of the higher order mode couplers is examined. The mechanical and piezo tuners are also characterized. The results of these performance tests will be discussed in this paper.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2005. PAC 2005. Proceedings of the; 06/2005
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    ABSTRACT: Advanced Energy Systems has recently completed the design of a four cavity cryomodule for use as an FEL injector accelerator on the JLAB Injector Test Stand. Fabrication is nearing completion. Four 748.5 MHz single cell superconducting cavities have been completed and are currently at Jefferson Lab for final processing and test prior to integration in the module. This paper will review the design and fabrication of the cavities and cryomodule.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2005. PAC 2005. Proceedings of the; 06/2005
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    ABSTRACT: In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and recommissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maintenance shutdown. We report on the overall SRF performance of the machine after these major disturbances and on efforts to characterize and optimize the new behavior for high-energy running.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2005. PAC 2005. Proceedings of the; 06/2005
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    ABSTRACT: This paper will discuss the technology transfer aspect of superconducting RF expertise as it pertains to cryomodule production, beginning with the original design requirements through testing and concluding with product delivery to the end user. The success of future industrialization of accelerator systems is dependent upon a focused effort on accelerator technology transfer. Over the past twenty years the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has worked with industry to successfully design, manufacture, test and commission more superconducting RF cryomodules than any other entity in the United States. The most recent accomplishment of Jefferson Lab has been the successful production of twenty-four cryomodules designed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Jefferson Lab was chosen, by the United States Department of Energy, to provide the superconducting portion of the SNS linac due to its reputation as a primary resource for SRF expertise. The successful partnering with and development of industrial resources to support the fabrication of the superconducting RF cryomodules for SNS by Jefferson Lab will be the focus of this paper.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2005. PAC 2005. Proceedings of the; 06/2005
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    ABSTRACT: We describe the concepts and developments underway at JLab as part of the program to develop a new CW cryomodule capable of transporting Ampere-level beam currents in a compact FEL. Requirements include real-estate gradient of at least 10 MV/m and very strong HOM damping to push BBU thresholds up by two or more orders of magnitude compared to existing designs. Cavity shape, HOM damping, power couplers, tuners etc. are being designed and optimized for this application. Cavity considerations include a large iris for beam halo, low-RF losses, HOM frequencies and Q’s, low peak surface fields, field flatness and microphonics. Module considerations include high packing factor, low static heat leak, image current heating of beam-line components, cost and maintainability. This module is being developed for the next generation ERL based high power FELs but may be useful for other applications such as electron cooling, electron-ion colliders, industrial processing etc.
    Particle Accelerator Conference, 2005. PAC 2005. Proceedings of the; 06/2005

Publication Stats

347 Citations
24.14 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2009
    • Newport Laboratories
      Worthington, Minnesota, United States
    • Northrop Grumman
      Falls Church, Virginia, United States
  • 2005
    • Brookhaven National Laboratory
      • Collider-Accelerator Department
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1997–2005
    • Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility
      Newport News, Virginia, United States
  • 2003
    • Los Alamos National Laboratory
      Los Alamos, California, United States