Thierry Beguiristain

University of Lorraine, Nancy, Lorraine, France

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Publications (36)101.46 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The high organic pollutant concentration of aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated wasteland soils is highly recalcitrant to biodegradation due to its very low bioavailability. In such soils, the microbial community is well adapted to the pollution, but the microbial activity is limited by nutrient availability. Management strategies could be applied to modify the soil microbial functioning as well as the PAH contamination through various amendment types. The impact of amendment with clay minerals (montmorillonite), wood sawdust and organic matter plant roots on microbial community structure was investigated on two aged PAH-contaminated soils both in laboratory and 1-year on-site pot experiments. Total PAH content (sum of 16 PAHs of the US-EPA list) and polar polycyclic aromatic compounds (pPAC) were monitored as well as the available PAH fraction using the Tenax method. The bacterial and fungal community structures were monitored using fingerprinting thermal gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) method. The abundance of bacteria (16S rRNA genes), fungi (18S rRNA genes) and PAH degraders (PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase and catechol dioxygenase genes) was followed through qPCR assays. Although the treatments did not modify the total and available PAH content, the microbial community density, structure and the PAH degradation potential changed when fresh organic matter was provided as sawdust and under rhizosphere influence, while the clay mineral only increased the percentage of catechol-1,2-dioxygenase genes. The abundance of bacteria and fungi and the percentage of fungi relative to bacteria were enhanced in soil samples supplemented with wood sawdust and in the plant rhizospheric soils. Two distinct fungal populations developed in the two soils supplemented with sawdust, i.e. fungi related to Chaetomium and Neurospora genera and Brachyconidiellopsis and Pseudallescheria genera, in H and NM soils respectively. Wood sawdust amendment favoured the development of PAH-degrading bacteria holding Gram-negative PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase, catechol-1,2-dioxygenase and catechol-2,3-dioxygenase genes. Regarding the total community structure, bacteria closely related to Thiobacillus (β-Proteobacteria) and Steroidobacter (γ-Proteobacteria) genera were favoured by wood sawdust amendment. In both soils, plant rhizospheres induced the development of fungi belonging to Ascomycota and related to Alternaria and Fusarium genera. Bacteria closely related to Luteolibacter (Verrucomicrobia) and Microbacterium (Actinobacteria) were favoured in alfalfa and ryegrass rhizosphere.
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research 01/2015; DOI:10.1007/s11356-015-4117-3 · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    The First Global Soil Biodiversity Conference, Centre des Congrès, Dijon, France; 12/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Current soil quality evaluation does not include an assessment of metal bioavailability to organisms. However, sentinel soil-dwelling invertebrates can be used for such an assessment. This study aims to establish the modulating soil parameter of metal bioavailability to snails and a procedure for ranking field sites (n = 9; 43 plots) based on the evaluation of the transfer of metals to the land snails used as indicators of metal zooavailability. Multivariate regressions identify soil pH, organic carbon and iron oxides influence cadmium, chromium, copper, lead and zinc zooavailability to snails underlining the need to consider other parameter than total soil concentration during bioavailability assessment. However, for As, no influence of soil parameter on it bioavailability to snails was identified. Internal Concentrations of Reference (CIRef) of Cd, Pb, As, Cr, Cu and Zn were determined in Cantareus aspersus that were caged on unpolluted plots. CIRef allow for the identification of contaminated sites. CIRef have revealed unexpected metal transfer on some “unpolluted” sites and a lack of transfer on some contaminated sites, thus confirming the necessity for biological measures to evaluate metal mobility. The Sum of Excess of Transfers (SET) index ranked the industrially impacted sites as the top priorities for management. We recommend that the SET methodology be used for future environmental risk assessment. By highlighting real metal transfers and considering the numerous parameters influencing environmental bioavailability, the snails watch provides information on environmental quality.
    Ecological Indicators 06/2013; 29:445-454. DOI:10.1016/j.ecolind.2013.01.012 · 3.23 Impact Factor
  • AquaConSoil, Barcelona, Spain; 04/2013
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    ABSTRACT: Very little is known about the influence of bacterial-fungal ecological interactions on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) dissipation in soils. Fusarium solani MM1 and Arthrobacter oxydans MsHM11 can dissipate PAHs in vitro. We investigated their interactions and their effect on the dissipation of three PAHs-phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR) and dibenz(a,h)anthracene (DBA)-in planted microcosms, in sterile sand or non-sterile soil. In sterile sand microcosms planted with alfalfa, the two microbes survived and grew, without any significant effect of co-inoculation. Co-inoculation led to the dissipation of 46 % of PHE after 21 days. In soil microcosms, whether planted with alfalfa or not, both strains persisted throughout the 46 days of the experiment, without any effect of co-inoculation or of alfalfa, as assessed by real-time PCR targeting taxon-level indicators, i.e. Actinobacteria 16S rDNA and the intergenic transcribed spacer specific to the genus Fusarium. The microbial community was analyzed by temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis and real-time PCR targeting bacterial and fungal rDNA and PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase genes. These communities were modified by PAH pollution, which selected PAH-degrading bacteria, by the presence of alfalfa and, concerning the bacterial community, by inoculation. PHE and PYR concentrations significantly decreased (91 and 46 %, respectively) whatever the treatment, but DBA concentration significantly decreased (30 %) in planted and co-inoculated microcosms only.
    Biodegradation 03/2013; DOI:10.1007/s10532-013-9628-3 · 2.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In contaminated soils, several natural processes (e.g. biodegradation, oxidation) can induce degradation of organic pollutants. To evaluate the effects of biodegradation on the organic matter and the main organic constituents (coal and coal tar) of a coking plant soil, we conducted a batch incubation experiment, whereby mineral nutrient solution and a microbial inoculum from the coking plant soil were added to the different samples. Microbial counts were monitored during the 9 months of the biodegradation experiment and the mineralization rate was quantified by measuring the CO2 produced and the content, molecular weight (MW) distribution and molecular composition of the solvent extractable organic matter. The microbial enumeration and mineralization rate demonstrated no biodegradation with the coal tar but biodegradation was observed for the coal and coking plant soil samples. The coking plant soil exhibited the highest biodegradation rate, probably due to complex interactions between the different organic and mineral phases and the presence of various nutrient and carbon sources. Biodegradation of the kerogen with subsequent production of lower MW compounds (n-alkanes and isoprenoids) was observed for both coal and coking plant soil samples. The results indicate that the kerogen could be a potential source of carbon for the microorganisms and showed the central role of coal in the changes observed for the coking plant soil.
    Organic Geochemistry 03/2013; 56:10-18. DOI:10.1016/j.orggeochem.2012.12.002 · 2.83 Impact Factor
  • SUITMA 7, Torun, Pologne; 01/2013
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    ABSTRACT: The fungal communities of a multi-contaminated soil polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals (NM) were studied within a long-term in situ experiment of natural attenuation assisted by plants. Three treatments were monitored: bare soil (NM-BS), soil planted with alfalfa and inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi (NM-Msm), and soil with spontaneous vegetation (NM-SV). The same soil after thermal desorption (TD) was planted with alfalfa and inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi (TD-Msm). Twice a year for 5 years, the fungal abundance and the community structure were evaluated by real-time PCR and temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis targeting 18S rRNA genes. The fungal abundance increased over time and was higher in planted than in bare NM soil and in TD than in NM soil. The Shannon diversity index (H') increased during the first 2 years with the emergence of more than 30 ribotypes, but decreased after 3 years with the selection of a few competitive species, mostly Ascomycetes. H' was higher under complex plant assemblage (NM-SV) than in the NM-BS plots but did not differ between NM and TD soils planted with alfalfa. These results indicated that even in a highly polluted soil, the plant cover was the main driver of the fungal community structure.
    FEMS Microbiology Ecology 05/2012; 82(1):169-81. DOI:10.1111/j.1574-6941.2012.01414.x · 3.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) dissipation potential of Fusarium solani MM1 and Arthrobacter oxydans MsHM11, isolated from a PAH-polluted soil, was investigated in liquid cultures containing 500, 500, and 50 mg l−1 of phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR), and dibenz(a,h)anthracene (DBA), respectively. The contributions of adsorption, absorption and biotransformation were evaluated separately by extracting and analysing PAHs from the biomass and from the culture medium. In the pure culture, F. solani dissipated approximately 30% of each tested PAH in 28 days when glucose was supplied as the carbon source. PAH adsorption on F. solani hyphae was negligible, whereas absorption was found to account for one-third of the dissipation. Absorbed PAHs, reaching 3% of the fungal dry biomass, could be visualised in autofluorescent intracellular vesicles. In contrast, A. oxydans grew on PAHs as sole carbon source and led to 55% dissipation of PHE in 28 days without any significant absorption. This dissipation potential was inhibited by the presence of glucose, and the PYR and DBA contents were never dissipated in the bacterial pure culture. In the mixed co-culture, the PAH dissipation rates were lower, showing that antagonistic interactions, such as pH changes or competition for carbon source, indirectly inhibited both microbial potentials.
    International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation 03/2012; 68:28-35. DOI:10.1016/j.ibiod.2011.10.012 · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    Cécile Thion, Aurelie Cebron, Thierry Beguiristain, Corinne Leyval
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    ABSTRACT: The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) dissipation potential of Fusarium solani MM1 and Arthrobacter oxydans MsHM11, isolated from a PAH-polluted soil, was investigated in liquid cultures containing 500, 500, and 50 mg l−1 of phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR), and dibenz(a,h)anthracene (DBA), respectively. The contributions of adsorption, absorption and biotransformation were evaluated separately by extracting and analysing PAHs from the biomass and from the culture medium. In the pure culture, F. solani dissipated approximately 30% of each tested PAH in 28 days when glucose was supplied as the carbon source. PAH adsorption on F. solani hyphae was negligible, whereas absorption was found to account for one-third of the dissipation. Absorbed PAHs, reaching 3% of the fungal dry biomass, could be visualised in autofluorescent intracellular vesicles. In contrast, A. oxydans grew on PAHs as sole carbon source and led to 55% dissipation of PHE in 28 days without any significant absorption. This dissipation potential was inhibited by the presence of glucose, and the PYR and DBA contents were never dissipated in the bacterial pure culture. In the mixed co-culture, the PAH dissipation rates were lower, showing that antagonistic interactions, such as pH changes or competition for carbon source, indirectly inhibited both microbial potentials.
    International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation 01/2012; 68(1):28-35. · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Considering the limited number of bioindicators available to assess soil quality, a national research programme was set up in France to develop such indicators (2006-2012), the "Bioindicator" programme.This programme tested 47 biological parameters (i.e. microorganisms, fauna, flora) including earthworms, in several sites differing in terms of land use, contamination type - PAHs or metals - and pollution levels. The present study proposes some study objectives for bioindicator approaches, based on the earthwormn results from the programme. Therefore, different earthworm descriptors were tested at the community level (e.g. abundance, biomass, species and functional structures, and ecological traits) as well as the organism level (i.e. measuring the metallothionein coding gene expression level in earthworms). The present results, obtained from the programme's spring 2009 sampling campaign, discriminated among the different descriptors and showed that earthworm and endogeic abundance as well as the individual weight of endogeics seem to be good indicators in non-contaminated (cultivated) sites, while the ecological structure, namely the proportion of anecic vs. endogeic species, and the proportion of non-vulnerable species should be used as indicators of contaminated soils. Furthermore, the first results obtained for Lumbricus terrestris and L rubellus rubellus are encouraging as they show that metallothionein expression increases in metal-contaminated soils. The relevance of these descriptors, which have to be considered in study objectives, requires the analysis of 2010 results.
    Pedobiologia 12/2011; 54:77-87. DOI:10.1016/j.pedobi.2011.09.015 · 1.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Plant species (exotic invasive vs native non-invasive) colonization pattern and the relation with the soil nutrient availability and AM fungi abundance, was investigated. Soil samples were collected from two sites: one invaded by the exotic plant, Amaranthus viridis, and one uninvaded site for chemical and AM propagules density analyses. Additionally, we grew five Sahelian Acacia species in soil from the two sites, sterilized or not, to test the involvement of soil biota in the invasion process. While nutrient availability was significantly higher in soil samples from the invaded sites, a drastic reduction in AM fungal community density, was observed. Moreover, Acacia seedlings' growth was severely reduced in soils invaded by Amaranthus and this effect was similar to that of sterilized soil of both origins. The observed growth inhibition was accompanied by reduction of AM colonization and nodulation of the roots. Finally, the influence of soil chemistry and AM symbiosis on exotic plants' invasion processes is discussed.
    Journal of Environmental Management 02/2011; 95 Suppl:S275-9. DOI:10.1016/j.jenvman.2011.01.025 · 3.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Due to human activities, large volumes of soils are contaminated with organic pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and very often by metallic pollutants as well. Multipolluted soils are therefore a key concern for remediation. This work presents a long-term evaluation of the fate and environmental impact of the organic and metallic contaminants of an industrially polluted soil under natural and plant-assisted conditions. A field trial was followed for four years according to six treatments in four replicates: unplanted, planted with alfalfa with or without mycorrhizal inoculation, planted with Noccaea caerulescens, naturally colonized by indigenous plants, and thermally treated soil planted with alfalfa. Leaching water volumes and composition, PAH concentrations in soil and solutions, soil fauna and microbial diversity, soil and solution toxicity using standardized bioassays, plant biomass, mycorrhizal colonization, were monitored. Results showed that plant cover alone did not affect total contaminant concentrations in soil. However, it was most efficient in improving the contamination impact on the environment and in increasing the biological diversity. Leaching water quality remained an issue because of its high toxicity shown by micro-algae testing. In this matter, prior treatment of the soil by thermal desorption proved to be the only effective treatment.
    International Journal of Phytoremediation 01/2011; 13 Suppl 1:245-63. DOI:10.1080/15226514.2011.568546 · 1.47 Impact Factor
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    Grassland biodiversity: habitat types, ecological processes and environmental impacts., Edited by Runas Johan (ed, Dahlgren Theodor (ed, 01/2010: pages 267-301; New York : Nova Science Publishers.
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    ABSTRACT: Within the French National programme GESSOL and the GISFI consortium, the BIOTECHNOSOL project has been carried out. The purpose of the project aims to acquire information about the biodiversity of constructed Technosols that are used to restore brownfields. Results indicate an increase of biodiversity in the system within the two first study years.
    WCSS; 01/2010
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    X B Zhou, A Cébron, T Béguiristain, C Leyval
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    ABSTRACT: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) dissipation efficiency can be increased in the plant rhizosphere, but may be affected by various environmental factors. We investigated the effects of the watering regime and phosphorus concentration on PAH dissipation in the rhizosphere of mycorrhizal plants in a pot experiment. Two plant species, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea), were co-cultured and inoculated with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus intraradices) in PAH (phenanthrene (PHE)=500 mg kg(-1), pyrene (PYR)=500 mg kg(-1), dibenzo(a,h)anthracene (DBA)=65 mg kg(-1)) spiked agricultural soil for 6 weeks. Treatments with different phosphorus concentrations and watering regimes were compared. The PHE dissipation reached 90% in all treatments and was not affected by the treatments. The major finding was the significant positive impact of mycorrhizal plants on the dissipation of high molecular weight PAH (DBA) in high-water low-phosphorus treatment. Such an effect was not observed in high-water high-phosphorus and low-water low-phosphorus treatments, where AM colonization was very low. A positive linear relationship was detected between PYR dissipation and the percentage of Gram-positive PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase genes in high-water high-phosphorus treatments, but not in the other two treatments with lower phosphorus concentrations and water contents. Such results indicated that the phosphorus and water regime were important parameters for the dissipation of HMW-PAH.
    Chemosphere 09/2009; 77(6):709-13. DOI:10.1016/j.chemosphere.2009.08.050 · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination, bacterial community, and PAH-degrading bacteria were monitored in aged PAH-contaminated soil (Neuves-Maisons [NM] soil; with a mean of 1,915 mg of 16 PAHs.kg(-1) of soil dry weight) and in the same soil previously treated by thermal desorption (TD soil; with a mean of 106 mg of 16 PAHs.kg(-1) of soil dry weight). This study was conducted in situ for 2 years using experimental plots of the two soils. NM soil was colonized by spontaneous vegetation (NM-SV), planted with Medicago sativa (NM-Ms), or left as bare soil (NM-BS), and the TD soil was planted with Medicago sativa (TD-Ms). The bacterial community density, structure, and diversity were estimated by real-time PCR quantification of the 16S rRNA gene copy number, temporal thermal gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting, and band sequencing, respectively. The density of the bacterial community increased the first year during stabilization of the system and stayed constant in the NM soil, while it continued to increase in the TD soil during the second year. The bacterial community structure diverged among all the plot types after 2 years on site. In the NM-BS plots, the bacterial community was represented mainly by Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. The presence of vegetation (NM-SV and NM-Ms) in the NM soil favored the development of a wider range of bacterial phyla (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Chloroflexi) that, for the most part, were not closely related to known bacterial representatives. Moreover, under the influence of the same plant, the bacterial community that developed in the TD-Ms was represented by different bacterial species (Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria) than that in the NM-Ms. During the 2 years of monitoring, the PAH concentration did not evolve significantly. The abundance of gram-negative (GN) and gram-positive (GP) PAH-degrading bacteria was estimated by real-time PCR quantification of specific functional genes encoding the alpha subunit of PAH-ring hydroxylating dioxygenase (PAH-RHD(alpha)). The percentage of the PAH-RHD(alpha) GN bacterial genes relative to 16S rRNA gene density decreased with time in all the plots. The GP PAH-RHD(alpha) bacterial gene proportion decreased in the NM-BS plots but stayed constant or increased under vegetation influence (NM-SV, NM-Ms, and TD-Ms).
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology 08/2009; 75(19):6322-30. DOI:10.1128/AEM.02862-08 · 3.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to determine whether the invasive plant Amaranthus viridis influenced soil microbial and chemical properties and to assess the consequences of these modifications on native plant growth. The experiment was conducted in Senegal at two sites: one invaded by A. viridis and the other covered by other plant species. Soil nutrient contents as well as microbial community density, diversity and functions were measured. Additionally, five sahelian Acacia species were grown in (1) soil disinfected or not collected from both sites, (2) uninvaded soil exposed to an A. viridis plant aqueous extract and (3) soil collected from invaded and uninvaded sites and inoculated or not with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices. The results showed that the invasion of A. viridis increased soil nutrient availability, bacterial abundance and microbial activities. In contrast, AM fungi and rhizobial development and the growth of Acacia species were severely reduced in A. viridis-invaded soil. Amaranthus viridis aqueous extract also exhibited an inhibitory effect on rhizobial growth, indicating an antibacterial activity of this plant extract. However, the inoculation of G. intraradices was highly beneficial to the growth and nodulation of Acacia species. These results highlight the role of AM symbiosis in the processes involved in plant coexistence and in ecosystem management programs that target preservation of native plant diversity.
    FEMS Microbiology Ecology 08/2009; 70(1):118-31. DOI:10.1111/j.1574-6941.2009.00740.x · 3.88 Impact Factor
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    Paul-Olivier Redon, Thierry Béguiristain, Corinne Leyval
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    ABSTRACT: Toxic metal accumulation in soils of agricultural interest is a serious problem needing more attention, and investigations on soil-plant metal transfer must be pursued to better understand the processes involved in metal uptake. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are known to influence metal transfer in plants by increasing plant biomass and reducing metal toxicity to plants even if diverging results were reported. The effects of five AM fungi isolated from metal contaminated or non-contaminated soils on metal (Cd, Zn) uptake by plant and transfer to leachates was assessed with Medicago truncatula grown in a multimetallic contaminated agricultural soil. Fungi isolated from metal-contaminated soils were more effective to reduce shoot Cd concentration. Metal uptake capacity differed between AM fungi and depended on the origin of the isolate. Not only fungal tolerance and ability to reduce metal concentrations in plant but also interactions with rhizobacteria affected heavy metal transfer and plant growth. Indeed, thanks to association with nodulating rhizobacteria, one Glomus intraradices inoculum increased particularly plant biomass which allowed exporting twofold more Cd and Zn in shoots as compared to non-mycorrhizal treatment. Cd concentrations in leachates were variable among fungal treatments, but can be significantly influenced by AM inoculation. The differential strategies of AM fungal colonisation in metal stress conditions are also discussed.
    Mycorrhiza 02/2009; 19(3):187-95. DOI:10.1007/s00572-009-0230-9 · 2.99 Impact Factor
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    Silva Sonjak, Thierry Beguiristain, Corinne Leyval, Marjana Regvar
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    ABSTRACT: Some plants are more mycorrhizal than others and mycorrhizal colonisation of plants in extreme environments is frequently additionally reduced due to decreased spore density and/or diversity and therefore frequently overlooked. We analysed two plant species from both metal polluted and saline enriched soils with differing mycorrhizal colonisation levels/status using classical and molecular methods. The selected plant species were Sesleria caerulea (L.) Ard. and Thlaspi praecox Wulfen from a metal polluted site, and Limonium angustifolium (Tausch) Degen [Statice serotina Rchb., L. vulgare Mill. subsp. Serotinum (Rchb.) Gams] and Salicornia europaea L. from the Sečovlje salterns in Slovenia. Despite the high mycorrhizal frequencies (F%) observed, the presence of arbuscules (A%) was at best low in S. caerulea and T. praecox, and undetectable in L. angustifolium and S. europaea. Temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TTGE) was applied to field-collected samples from both burdened environments and proved to be an effective technique for rapid profiling and identification of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the association of AMF of the genus Glomus with roots of all four plant species. This is the first report on the identification and profiling of Glomeromycota in the field-collected Cd/Zn metal hyperaccumulator T. praecox growing at a highly metal polluted site, as well as in L. angustifolium and S. europaea collected in a saline environment. The identification of AMF from both ecosystems only partially resembles previous identifications on the basis of spores.
    Plant and Soil 01/2009; 314(1):25-34. DOI:10.1007/s11104-008-9702-5 · 3.24 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

764 Citations
101.46 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2013
    • University of Lorraine
      Nancy, Lorraine, France
  • 2008–2013
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      • Laboratoire des interactions microorganismes-minéraux-matière organique dans les sols (LIMOS)
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2001
    • Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 1998–2000
    • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
      • Centre de Recherche de Nancy
      Paris, Ile-de-France, France