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Publications (2)2.77 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Biosorption has attracted attention as a cost-effective tool for the treatment of metal-bearing wastewater. While using novel biosorbents, optimization of operating conditions becomes more important for the efficiency of the process. In this study, a novel biosorbent i.e. Alstonia scholaris leaves were used for biosorption of Cr (VI) from aqueous media. The effect of various parameters, such as contact time of solution with biosorbent, temperature, pH, biosorbent dose and agitation speed were studied. A comparative study of modification of biosorbent using acid and base was also performed. It has been found that acid treated Alstonia scholaris leaves have greater biosorption capacity as compared to untreated and base treated leaves. Optimum conditions for removing Cr (VI) using acid treated biosorbent were: 0.2 g/50 mL of biosorbent, 50 o C temperature, 15 minutes contact time, 300 rpm stirring speed and 2.0 pH. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were also employed to evaluate maximum biosorption capacity of untreated and chemically treated Alstonia scholaris leaves for Cr (VI).
    Journal- Chemical Society of Pakistan 01/2012; 34(2):292-298. · 1.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Agro-waste materials have carboxylic and phenolic groups that play the main role in metal adsorption. The advantages of these materials include easy availability, low cost, and reasonable metal removal capacity. One of the materials (usually considered as waste) is pea waste (pods). Present work comprises adsorption of chromium from aqueous solution using powder of pods of garden peas (Pisum sativum) in batch. Important parameters like adsorbent dose, pH, contact time, and agitation speed were studied. Adsorption equilibrium was explained by Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherms. Maximum chromium uptake (q m) was 3.56 mg/g of adsorbent. Heat of adsorption, as evaluated by Temkin isotherm was 1.96 kJ/mol. It is proposed that pea pods can be an effective and environmentally benign (green) adsorbents for removal of chromium from industrial effluents and waste waters.
    Green Chemistry Letters and Reviews 01/2010; 3:239-243. · 1.39 Impact Factor