S Yamamoto

Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Hyōgo, Japan

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Publications (1186)2389.66 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We propose a new automatic method called the rotational pixel swapping (RPSW) method to detect circular features in binary images of remote sensing images. The method is based on a multiplication operation between the original image and the rotated images. We show that the RPSW selectively enhances rotational symmetric patterns and weakens nonrotational symmetric patterns, including noise components, without any noise reduction processes. The method can detect not only simple circles but also more complex circular features such as incomplete ring structures or several concentric rings. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the RPSW provides the stable detection of circular features such as terrestrial impact structures, which are irregular imperfect circular shapes, in binary images based on Earth-observation satellite images. The RPSW would provide a potential method of future surveys or statistical studies using huge data sets of multiband or hyperspectral images obtained by Earth-observation satellites.
    IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 01/2015; 53(2):710-723. · 3.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This work is on the Physics of the B Factories. Part A of this book contains a brief description of the SLAC and KEK B Factories as well as their detectors, BaBar and Belle, and data taking related issues. Part B discusses tools and methods used by the experiments in order to obtain results. The results themselves can be found in Part C.
    06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Measurements of four-lepton (4ℓ, ℓ=e,μ) production cross sections at the Z resonance in pp collisions at the LHC with the ATLAS detector are presented. For dilepton and four-lepton invariant mass regions m_{ℓ^{+}ℓ^{-}}>5 GeV and 80<m_{4ℓ}<100 GeV, the measured cross sections are 76±18(stat)±4(syst)±1.4(lumi) fb and 107±9(stat)±4(syst)±3.0(lumi) fb at sqrt[s]=7 and 8 TeV, respectively. By subtracting the nonresonant 4ℓ production contributions and normalizing with Z→μ^{+}μ^{-} events, the branching fraction for the Z boson decay to 4ℓ is determined to be (3.20±0.25(stat)±0.13(syst))×10^{-6}, consistent with the standard model prediction.
    Physical Review Letters 06/2014; 112(23):231806. · 7.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has the potential to significantly increase the number of organ donors. In this study, we investigate the influence of several donor parameters on the early graft function in kidney transplantation from DCD donors. We performed 58 kidney transplantations from DCD donors. Recipients were divided into 2 groups according to their graft function: normal graft function (NGF), patients who became be free of hemodialysis within 14 days post-transplantation) and delayed graft function (DGF) group, patients who required hemodialysis for longer than 15 days after transplantation). We compared donor age, sex, cause of death, warm and total ischemic time, duration of anuria (urine volume < 10 mL/h), and low blood pressure (systolic blood pressure < 60 mm Hg), usage of catecholamine and vasopressin, serum creatinine on the day of admission and graft retrieval, serum sodium concentration, and body temperature between 2 groups. The number of recipients in NGF and DGF group was 41 and 17. Univariate analysis revealed that duration of anuria (<24 vs ≥24 hours) and usage of catecholamine significantly influenced graft function. Duration of anuria was an independent risk factor for early graft function by multivariate analysis. In cadaveric kidney transplantation from DCD donors, there was a trend to poorer early graft function with donors who suffered from anuria for longer than 24 hours before kidney retrieval.
    Transplantation Proceedings 05/2014; 46(4):1064-6. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Edge fluctuation in a supersonic molecular-beam injection (SMBI) fueled plasma has been measured using an electrostatic probe array. After SMBI, the plasma stored energy (Wp) temporarily decreased then started to increase. The local plasma fluctuation and fluctuation induced particle transport before and after SMBI have been analyzed. In a short duration (̃4 ms) just after SMBI, the density fluctuation of broad-band low frequency increased, and the probability density function (PDF) changed from a nearly Gaussian to a positively skewed non-Gaussian one. This suggests that intermittent structures were produced due to SMBI. Also the fluctuation induced particle transport was greatly enhanced during this short duration. About 4 ms after SMBI, the low frequency broad-band density fluctuation decreased, and the PDF returned to a nearly Gaussian shape. Also the fluctuation induced particle transport was reduced. Compared with conventional gas puff, Wp degradation window is very short due to the short injection period of SMBI. After this short degradation window, fluctuation induced particle transport was reduced and Wp started the climbing phase. Therefore, the short period of the influence to the edge fluctuation might be an advantage of this novel fueling technique. On the other hand, although their roles are not identified at present, coherent MHD modes are also suppressed as well by the application of SMBI. These MHD modes are thought to be de-exited due to a sudden change of the edge density and/or excitation conditions.
    03/2014; 21(4).
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    ABSTRACT: We report the surface roughness analysis of the lunar highlands for the baseline range 0.15–100 km. We use the Median Differential Slope αm to investigate the scale dependency of the roughness and derive the global αm distribution from SELENE Laser Altimeter and Terrain Camera data. While αm(l) versus baseline l (km) plots vary among different highland types, all highlands commonly show a peak at 3–30 km. The Pre-Nectarian surface shows a relatively large αm(20–30 km). Our analysis is supported by the simulation of synthetic surface cratering models and crater statistics. In our simulation, a peak of αm(30 km) is successfully reproduced. The actual crater density shows good correlation with an empirical roughness indicator. However, a large part of the Nectarian surface shows a peak at 6–9 km baseline. This peak may be caused by secondary craters and ejecta deposit textures from the Nectarian system basins.
    Geophysical Research Letters. 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated correlation of Mg# and Th abundance on the lunar highland to understand solidification and composition of the lunar magma ocean.
    02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We report the global distribution of high-Ca pyroxene on lunar highland regions revealed by the Spectral Profiler onboard the lunar explorer SELENE (Kaguya).
    02/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: A search is presented for dark matter pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions representing 20.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity at s=8 TeV using data recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Events with a hadronic jet with the jet mass consistent with a W or Z boson, and with large missing transverse momentum are analyzed. The data are consistent with the standard model expectations. Limits are set on the mass scale in effective field theories that describe the interaction of dark matter and standard model particles, and on the cross section of Higgs production and decay to invisible particles. In addition, cross section limits on the anomalous production of W or Z bosons with large missing transverse momentum are set in two fiducial regions.
    Physical Review Letters 01/2014; 112(4):041802. · 7.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A novel reconstruction method is developed for acquiring the electron density profile from multi-channel interferometric measurements of strongly asymmetrical toroidal plasmas. It is based on a regularization technique, and a generalized cross-validation function is used to optimize the regularization parameter with the aid of singular value decomposition. The feasibility of method could be testified by simulated measurements based on a magnetic configuration of the flexible helical-axis heliotron device, Heliotron J, which has an asymmetrical poloidal cross section. And the successful reconstruction makes possible to construct a multi-channel Far-infrared laser interferometry on this device. The advantages of this method are demonstrated by comparison with a conventional method. The factors which may affect the accuracy of the results are investigated, and an error analysis is carried out. Based on the obtained results, the proposed method is highly promising for accurately reconstructing the electron density in the asymmetrical toroidal plasma.
    Review of Scientific Instruments 01/2014; 85(5):053506-053506-7. · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A flow cytometry cross-match (FCXM) test is the gold standard for detection of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies in renal transplantation because of its high sensitivity. However, this technique can produce false-positive results when non-HLA antibodies or low-titer donor-specific antibodies (DSA) are detected. To determine the clinical relevance of the recently introduced novel cross-match test termed immunocomplex capture fluorescence analysis (ICFA), we retrospectively compared the results of ICFA and FCXM, including a single-antigen bead test for detection of DSA in renal transplant recipients. We found a correlation of 71.4% (235/329) between the results of ICFA-I and FCXM-T, whereas that between ICFA-II and FCXM-B was 41.1% (134/326). Ninety-four patients were ICFA-I negative and FCXM-T positive, and 188 were ICFA-II negative and FCXM-B positive, whereas 46.8% (44/94) and 61.7% (116/188) were found to be DSA-I and DSA-II negative, respectively, which classified them into the non-HLA antibody and low-titer DSA groups, respectively. The mean value of molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome for DSA-I was 22,994 in the ICFA-I–positive group, which was significantly higher than 2117 in the negative group (P < .0001), whereas there was no significant difference for DSA-II between the ICFA-II–positive and ICFA-II–negative groups. Graft survival in the ICFA-I–negative group was significantly higher than that in the ICFA-I–positive group (P = .0058). Our results indicate that ICFA-I does not respond to non-HLA antibodies or low-titer DSA, which have influence on graft survival. Therefore, this novel hybrid test, which combines cross-match testing and HLA antibody detection functions, may be useful for clinical pretransplantation evaluation of renal transplantation patients.
    Transplantation Proceedings 01/2014; 46(2):332–335. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Donation after cardiac death (DCD) has the potential to significantly increase the number of organ donors. In this study, we investigate the influence of several donor parameters on the early graft function in kidney transplantation from DCD donors. We performed 58 kidney transplantations from DCD donors. Recipients were divided into 2 groups according to their graft function: normal graft function (NGF), patients who became be free of hemodialysis within 14 days post-transplantation) and delayed graft function (DGF) group, patients who required hemodialysis for longer than 15 days after transplantation). We compared donor age, sex, cause of death, warm and total ischemic time, duration of anuria (urine volume < 10 mL/h), and low blood pressure (systolic blood pressure < 60 mm Hg), usage of catecholamine and vasopressin, serum creatinine on the day of admission and graft retrieval, serum sodium concentration, and body temperature between 2 groups. The number of recipients in NGF and DGF group was 41 and 17. Univariate analysis revealed that duration of anuria (<24 vs ≥24 hours) and usage of catecholamine significantly influenced graft function. Duration of anuria was an independent risk factor for early graft function by multivariate analysis. In cadaveric kidney transplantation from DCD donors, there was a trend to poorer early graft function with donors who suffered from anuria for longer than 24 hours before kidney retrieval.
    Transplantation Proceedings 01/2014; 46(4):1064–1066. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Spectral Profiler (SP) is a visible–near infrared spectrometer onboard the Japanese Selenological and Engineering Explorer (SELENE), which was launched in 2007 and observed the Moon until June 2009. The SP consists of two gratings and three linear-array detectors: VIS (0.5–1.0 $muhbox{m}$), NIR 1 (0.9–1.7 $muhbox{m}$), and NIR 2 (1.7–2.6 $muhbox{m}$). In this paper, we propose a new method for radiometric calibration of NIR 2, specifically for the dark output (background) estimate, which is different from the previous method used for VIS and NIR 1. We show that the reflectance spectra of NIR 2 derived from the new radiometric calibration show less noise than those of the previous method. Based on an analysis of the reflectance spectra at exposure sites of the end-member minerals on the lunar surface, we demonstrated that the spectral features of the 2- $muhbox{m}$ band in the NIR 2 spectra are consistent with those expected from the minerals inferred from the features of the 1- $muhbox{m}$ band in the VIS and NIR 1 spectra. Finally, we examined the repeatability of the radiometric calibration of NIR 2 using the SP data near the Apollo 16 landing site observed at four different times. The typical difference in the reflectance at wavelengths $< sim!! 2.1 muhbox{m}$ was a few percent, which is within the uncertainty due to the error in the background estimate, suggesting that there was no significant change in the sensitivity of NIR 2 over the mission period.
    IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 01/2014; 52(11):6882-6898. · 3.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This Letter presents measurements of the polarization of the top quark in top-antitop quark pair events, using 4.7 fb^{-1} of proton-proton collision data recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider at sqrt[s]=7 TeV. Final states containing one or two isolated leptons (electrons or muons) and jets are considered. Two measurements of α_{ℓ}P, the product of the leptonic spin-analyzing power and the top quark polarization, are performed assuming that the polarization is introduced by either a CP conserving or a maximally CP violating production process. The measurements obtained, α_{ℓ}P_{CPC}=-0.035±0.014(stat)±0.037(syst) and α_{ℓ}P_{CPV}=0.020±0.016(stat)_{-0.017}^{+0.013}(syst), are in good agreement with the standard model prediction of negligible top quark polarization.
    Physical Review Letters 12/2013; 111(23):232002. · 7.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Second harmonic electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been applied in the stellarator/heliotron (S/H) device, Heliotron J, to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. The energetic particle mode (EPM) of 60-90 kHz frequency, one of the energetic-ion-driven MHD modes, is excited in a plasma heated by co- and counter-neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron heating (ECH). The EPM has been stabilized by counter-ECCD which decreases the rotational transform. Localized EC current driven by a few kA at the central region modifies the rotational transform profile, ι/2π, leading to the formation of a high magnetic shear at the radius where the mode is excited. An experiment scanning the EC-driven current shows that there is a threshold in magnetic shear and/or rotational transform to stabilize the EPM.
    Nuclear Fusion 11/2013; 53(11):3041-. · 2.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: [1] We present details of the identification of sites that show an absorption band at visible wavelengths and a strong 2 μm band using the SELENE Spectral Profiler. All the sites exhibiting the visible feature are found on the regional dark mantle deposit (DMD) at Sinus Aestuum. All the instances of the visible feature show a strong 2 μm band, suggestive of Fe- and Cr-rich spinels, which are different from previously detected Mg-rich spinel. Since no visible feature is observed in other DMDs, the DMD at Sinus Aestuum is unique on the Moon. The occurrence trend of the spinels at Sinus Aestuum is also different from that of the Mg-rich spinels, which are associated with impact structures. This may suggest that the spinel at Sinus Aestuum is a different origin from that of the Mg-rich spinel.
    Geophysical Research Letters. 09/2013; 40(17).
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    ABSTRACT: Observations of the lunar surface within the past 10 years have been made with various lunar remote sensing instruments, the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) onboard the Chandrayaan-1 mission, the Spectral Profiler (SP), the Multiband Imager (MI), the Terrain Camera (TC) onboard the SELENE mission, and the ground based USGS Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) for some of them. The lunar phase functions derived from these datasets, which are used in the photometric modeling to correct for the various illumination conditions of the data, are compared to assess their differences and similarity in order to improve interpretations of lunar surface spectra. The phase functions are found to be similar across various phase angles except in the 0–20° range. Differences across the 0–20° range likely result from two different inputs in the photometric modeling of the M3 and SP data: (1) M3 has larger emission angles due to the characteristics of the instrument and the attitude of the spacecraft, and (2) M3 viewing geometry was derived from the local topography whereas SP used a spherical Moon (no topography). The combination of these two different inputs affects the phase function at small phase angles where shadows play a more substantial role, with spatial resolution differences between M3 and SP being another possible source for the differences. SP data are found to be redder (i.e., steeper slope with increasing wavelengths) than MI, M3 and ROLO. Finally, the M3 overall reflectance is also found to be lower than that the other instruments (i.e., MI, SP, and ROLO), generally at least 10% darker than MI. These differences can be observed at local scales in specific examples at hundreds of meters resolutions. At regional and global scales, the same differences are found, which demonstrates the overall stability of the various datasets. The observations from M3, TC, SP and MI are very stable and agree well; however caution should be used when making interpretations based on the spectral slope of SP data or on the absolute reflectance of M3 data.
    Icarus 09/2013; 226(1):127–139. · 3.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The hybrid probe system (a combination of Langmuir probes and magnetic probes), fast camera and gas puffing system were installed at the same toroidal section to study edge plasma turbulence/fluctuation in Heliotron J, especially blob (intermittent filament). Fast camera views the location of the probe head, so that the probe system yields the time evolution of the turbulence/fluctuation while the camera images the spatial profile. Gas puff at the same toroidal section was used to control the plasma density and simultaneous gas puff imaging technique. Using this combined system the filamentary structure associated with magnetic fluctuation was found in Heliotron J at the first time. The other kind of fluctuation was also observed at another experiment. This combination measurement enables us to distinguish MHD activity and electro-static activity.
    Journal of Nuclear Materials 07/2013; · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The optimization of gas fueling scenarios has been studied to improve the plasma performance in Heliotron J. Gas fueling effects on the plasma profile are discussed by comparing two fueling methods, a short pulse H2-beam fueling with a supersonic molecular-beam injection (SMBI) technique and a high intensity gas-puff fueling (HIGP) with a conventional gas puff technique. The maximum plasma stored energy Wp after SMBI is about 20% higher than that after HIGP in this NBI-only sustained plasma experiment, where the line-averaged density is almost the same (∼3 × 1019 m−3) for both cases. The electron and ion temperatures in the SMBI case are higher than those are in the HIGP case at the Wp-peak timing. A peaked density profile is observed after SMBI, while it is flat or slightly hollow for the case of HIGP. These observations point out the importance of SMBI fueling for plasma density control to obtain better plasma performance.
    Journal of Nuclear Materials 07/2013; 438:S453–S458. · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    Physics Letters B. 06/2013; 723(s 1–3):15–32.

Publication Stats

12k Citations
2,389.66 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Hyogo College of Medicine
      • Department of Urology
      Nishinomiya, Hyōgo, Japan
  • 1989–2014
    • Kyoto University
      • • Institute of Advanced Energy
      • • Department of Physics II
      • • Graduate School of Energy Science
      • • Department of Urology
      Kioto, Kyōto, Japan
    • Shimizu Corporation
      Тояма, Toyama, Japan
    • Ohu University
      Hukusima, Fukushima, Japan
  • 2010–2013
    • University of Freiburg
      • Faculty of Mathematics and Physics
      Freiburg, Lower Saxony, Germany
  • 1998–2013
    • High Energy Accelerator Research Organization
      • • Accelerator Laboratory
      • • Photon Factory
      • • Institute of Materials Structure Science
      Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
    • National Institute of Health Sciences, Japan
      • Division of Pathology
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1994–2013
    • National Institute for Environmental Studies
      Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
  • 1993–2012
    • The University of Tokyo
      • • Department of Physics
      • • Institute for Cosmic Ray Research
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center
      • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 2011
    • Nippon Telegraph and Telephone
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1994–2011
    • Japan Atomic Energy Agency
      • Quantum Beam Science Directorate
      Muramatsu, Niigata, Japan
  • 2009–2010
    • University of Tsukuba
      Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
  • 1968–2010
    • Nagoya University
      • Department of Energy Engineering and Science
      Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, Japan
  • 1984–2009
    • The University of Tokushima
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      • • Department of Biochemistry
      • • School of Medicine
      • • Department of Chemical Science and Technology
      Tokusima, Tokushima, Japan
  • 2008
    • Okayama University
      • Division of Environmental Science
      Okayama, Okayama, Japan
  • 1989–2008
    • Osaka University
      • • Graduate School of Engineering
      • • Graduate School of Science
      • • Department of Chemistry
      Suika, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 2007
    • Ibaraki University
      Mito-shi, Ibaraki, Japan
  • 2001–2007
    • Fukuoka University
      Hukuoka, Fukuoka, Japan
    • Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • Kagawa University
      • Department of Biochemistry
      Miki, Hyogo-ken, Japan
    • Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics
      • Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald
      Arching, Bavaria, Germany
    • Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1984–2007
    • Tohoku University
      • • Institute for Materials Research
      • • Department of Physiology II
      Sendai-shi, Miyagi-ken, Japan
  • 1972–2007
    • Osaka City University
      • • Department of Radiology
      • • Third Department of Internal Medicine
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 2004–2006
    • University Hospital Medical Information Network
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • University of California, Irvine
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Irvine, CA, United States
    • University of Maribor
      • Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
      Maribor, Mestna Obcina Maribor, Slovenia
  • 2005
    • National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology
      Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
    • Autonomous University of Barcelona
      Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain
    • Tokyo Metropolitan University
      • Department of Physics
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • Toho University
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • University of California, Berkeley
      • Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
      Berkeley, MO, United States
  • 1996–2005
    • Hiroshima University
      • • Graduate School of Engineering
      • • School of Medicine
      Hiroshima-shi, Hiroshima-ken, Japan
  • 2003–2004
    • Seoul National University
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • St.Mary's Hospital (Fukuoka - Japan)
      Hukuoka, Fukuoka, Japan
  • 2002–2003
    • Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • Stony Brook University
      • Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology
      Stony Brook, NY, United States
  • 2001–2003
    • Kyoto Women's University
      Kioto, Kyōto, Japan
    • The Graduate University for Advanced Studies
      • Department of Fusion Science
      Miura, Kanagawa-ken, Japan
  • 1996–2003
    • Keio University
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • School of Medicine
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan
  • 2001–2002
    • KDDI R&D Laboratories Inc.
      Йокосука, Kanagawa, Japan
  • 2000–2002
    • National Institute for Fusion Science
      Tokitsu-chō, Gifu, Japan
    • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
      Durham, North Carolina, United States
    • Hamamatsu Rosai Hospital
      Hamamatu, Shizuoka, Japan
    • Niigata University
      • Faculty of Medicine
      Niahi-niigata, Niigata, Japan
  • 1998–2002
    • Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Medical Center
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1997–2002
    • Chiba University
      • Department of Pediatrics
      Chiba-shi, Chiba-ken, Japan
    • University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • Department of Microbiology
      Birmingham, AL, United States
  • 1996–2001
    • Kobe College
      Kōbe, Hyōgo, Japan
  • 1994–2001
    • Kansai Medical University
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Third Department of Internal Medicine
      Moriguchi, Osaka-fu, Japan
  • 1993–2001
    • Nagasaki University Hospital
      Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan
  • 1999–2000
    • Aichi Gakuin University
      • • Department of Pharmacology
      • • Department of Periodontology
      Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, Japan
    • Onomichi General Hospital
      Onomiti, Hiroshima, Japan
    • National Cancer Center, Japan
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • Freie Universität Berlin
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
  • 1995–2000
    • Social Insurance Chukyo Hospital
      Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
  • 1991–2000
    • Osaka Central Hospital
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
    • International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
      Wien, Vienna, Austria
    • Osaka National Hospital
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 1997–1999
    • Asahi Kasei
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1995–1999
    • Central Institute for Experimental Animals
      Kawasaki Si, Kanagawa, Japan
  • 1993–1999
    • Biosafety Research Center, Foods, Drugs, and Pesticides - An-Pyo Center
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1997–1998
    • Osaka Kosei Nenkin Hospital
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
    • National Research Council
      • Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry ICB
      Roma, Latium, Italy
  • 1987–1998
    • Chiba University Hospital
      Tiba, Chiba, Japan
  • 1995–1997
    • Kitasato University
      • • Department of Pharmacology
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1993–1995
    • Bristol-Myers Squibb
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 1989–1995
    • Research Institute for Brain and Blood Vessels-Akita
      Akita, Akita, Japan
  • 1993–1994
    • Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
      Berlín, Berlin, Germany
    • Yamamoto General Hospital
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1990
    • The Ohio State University
      • Department of Veterinary Biosciences
      Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • 1989–1990
    • National Radio Astronomy Observatory
      Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • 1987–1989
    • Nippon Kayaku Co., Ltd.
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
    • Vanderbilt University
      • Department of Pharmacology
      Nashville, MI, United States
  • 1988
    • Josai University
      Saitama, Saitama, Japan